or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How to calculate daily vertical without technology.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to calculate daily vertical without technology.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Sorry for the naive question but as I have a self imposed ban on phones during holidays I can't use the mountain apps to calculate how much skiing I've done.

Is it as simple as logging which runs you've done each day and then multiplying them out with the vertical rise of each run?
post #2 of 20

sbooker,

 

Without technology (on the hill)

 

Your approach sounds good.

 

If I knew trail X has a vertical of 1000 feet and I skied down trail X 10 times then I have 10,000 feet vertical from just that trail.

 

Do the same for all the other trails on the mountain and keep a tally, without technology of course.

 

Where you may need to be careful – A run is composed of more than one trail.  In this case, you would need to determine the vertical for the run you chose to complete.

 

You can get a good estimate using google earth (or other topographical information) if the ski area does not provide the vertical of individual trails.

 

 

Another thing you may try:  If the ski area has a 2,000 foot vertical and you always ski the entire vertical (from top to bottom – is there any other way ;)), then each time you ski down the mountain add 2,000 ft to your total vertical.

post #3 of 20
Or, if the area publishes the lift stats, just keep track of the lifts you ride. Even if some trails take you to another section of the resort, ultimately all the ups come close to the total of the downs. That's how I make sure my altimeter (Brunton) is working every season. Since at the beginning of the season, my runs aren't that many, I can do this for fifteen days or so and compare the aggregate to see how far off it is. Usually well within five percent. A battery that needs to be replaced will be all over the map.
post #4 of 20

@sbooker : if you have a few runs that you want numbers for, I think Hillmap may be useful after a little practice.  @dbostedo knows how to use it.

 

http://www.hillmap.com

post #5 of 20

I couldn't care less how much vertical I've done, my  average speed, top speed or anything else an app could figure out for me. Go chase pokemon.

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post
 

I couldn't care less how much vertical I've done, my  average speed, top speed or anything else an app could figure out for me.

 

But all of those can be fun to know! Some of us like data.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post
 

Go chase pokemon.

 

That can be fun too! (Although I'm not sure it's for me... I did give it a try. :cool)

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post
 

I couldn't care less how much vertical I've done, my  average speed, top speed or anything else an app could figure out for me. Go chase pokemon.

 

I have averaged 80 days per year for over 40 years...I don't need no stinking stats!!.:devil:

post #8 of 20

As far as Hillmap goes... you can use it, but you do need to keep track of your runs or lifts, which could be a bit of a pain. But you'll be able to see a cool map of where you skied.

 

Here's a simple example... let's pretend I went to Whitetail, and skied each of the 10 main trails once. That would mean riding the EZ Rider Quad twice, the Whitetail Express Quad 5 times, and the Expert's Choice Quad 3 times. 

 

If I knew how much vert each of those lifts was, I could just do the math. Since I don't, I can go to Hillmap and find the resort (you can search with search link in the upper right). It will look like this : 

 

 

 

Now most resorts will also show color coded lines along the runs on the topographic map (as Google Maps does). Whitetail is missing this, annoyingly. Anyway, if you click on "Paths" at the top, you'll be in path drawing mode. You can draw any paths you want and get statistics and a topographic profile of it. For instance, if I wanted to check the main lift at Whitetail, and one of the blue runs, I might draw this path :

 

 

 

That shows that that lift and run cover about 895 vertical feet, along 1.25 miles. If I click the "Profile" button at the top, it pops up a window that shows the profile of the path, showing how steep it is all along the way :

 

 

 

You can see that the run I traced hovers around 20 degrees for the top two thirds of the run before a flatter section back to the lift. You could do this with each lift or run to find whatever vertical measurements you like. It would be simplest just to measure each lift, and multiply things out if you kept track of which lifts you rode.

 

Alternatively, you could trace all the runs you did, assuming you kept track, and really see that path you took. This would be a path taking each main run at Whitetail :

 

 

 

A total of 7842 vertical, and 12 miles of skiing. And here's the profile view :

 

 

 

With that many slopes, the profile isn't too useful, but I traced the greens then blues then blacks, and you can see the slopes getting progressively steeper. 

 

Anyway, I think Hillmap is fun to mess around with, and seems pretty accurate (it's based on the US Geo Survey topographic maps).

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post
 

I couldn't care less how much vertical I've done, my  average speed, top speed or anything else an app could figure out for me. Go chase pokemon.


Just a curiosity thing for me. I don't ski much being from a sub tropical climate but I hear many people refer to how much vertical in a day. I have no reference point as I've never measured it. Is 30000 vertical feet a lot for example?

I know I start my day when the lifts open and finish when they close and I have a lot of fun in between.

I am a tech dinosaur - I have no interest in Pokémon.

Thanks for the helpful response anyway.

post #10 of 20
30,000 is a quite respectable day. Supposedly the average day for the average skier is 14,000. There's a dude here that averaged WAY WAY WAY more than that per day last year. But that's sticking to groomers all day long and taking the straightest line back to the lift. Who wants to do that? My biggest day ever was 51,901 and there's no way I'd ever do it again. (Pretty sure these days I couldn't anyway.)
post #11 of 20

We ski to experience an alternative to the internal dialog of our minds.   Why would you care to total the descended footage? 

post #12 of 20
Why keep score in baseball? Why not just enjoy the nice weather?

Some people enjoy scores.
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Why keep score in baseball? Why not just enjoy the nice weather?

Some people enjoy scores.

 

A baseball game has winners and losers, recreational skiing does not. OTOH if you are a Cubs fan, I guess you just enjoy the nice weather.

 

For me, on a powder day I think it is more about the number of powder turns, not how much vertical that you can straight line and no way I would ever count turns.

post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbooker View Post
 


Just a curiosity thing for me. I don't ski much being from a sub tropical climate but I hear many people refer to how much vertical in a day. I have no reference point as I've never measured it. Is 30000 vertical feet a lot for example?

I know I start my day when the lifts open and finish when they close and I have a lot of fun in between.

I am a tech dinosaur - I have no interest in Pokémon.

Thanks for the helpful response anyway.

The vert definitely depends on what you are skiing and what you hope to achieve.  

30k is pretty solid and means you are able to ski  long groomer runs in 1 go without stopping, and then repeating it again and again for at least 3hrs in the morning and 3hrs in the afternoon. 

 

 

I think though many would also count that a solid resort day skiing for an dedicated skier should be at least 20 runs, just in terms of you've experienced 10 runs before lunch, and 10 things after lunch to be able to have found or had enough variety .

Of course hard or easy or awesome terrain can mix things up.  Like some could spend a whole day to hike and ski 1 run a few times that would be awesome.

 

But in general on the trails, a benchmark of doing 20 *different* things can make your day feel pretty "solid".

post #15 of 20
20 runs here would be 46,000 feet. 20 runs at Camelback would be 16,000 feet. Hardly comparable. Plus, I'd suggest that 20,000 of off piste beats 50,000 on piste in the "solid" category. You just can't make those kinds of generalizations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sbooker View Post

 


Just a curiosity thing for me. I don't ski much being from a sub tropical climate but I hear many people refer to how much vertical in a day. I have no reference point as I've never measured it. Is 30000 vertical feet a lot for example?
I know I start my day when the lifts open and finish when they close and I have a lot of fun in between.
I am a tech dinosaur - I have no interest in Pokémon.
Thanks for the helpful response anyway.
The vert definitely depends on what you are skiing and what you hope to achieve.  
30k is pretty solid and means you are able to ski  long groomer runs in 1 go without stopping, and then repeating it again and again for at least 3hrs in the morning and 3hrs in the afternoon. 


I think though many would also count that a solid resort day skiing for an dedicated skier should be at least 20 runs, just in terms of you've experienced 10 runs before lunch, and 10 things after lunch to be able to have found or had enough variety .
Of course hard or easy or awesome terrain can mix things up.  Like some could spend a whole day to hike and ski 1 run a few times that would be awesome.

But in general on the trails, a benchmark of doing 20 *different* things can make your day feel pretty "solid".
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'm going for a few days on the snow here in Australia in a couple of weeks. One of the 'main' runs has only approx. 1100 feet vertical but because of the gentle pitch the run itself is long. If I lapped that 20 times I'd be putting in a big day - but the vertical would not be that great.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Or, if the area publishes the lift stats, just keep track of the lifts you ride. Even if some trails take you to another section of the resort, ultimately all the ups come close to the total of the downs. That's how I make sure my altimeter (Brunton) is working every season. Since at the beginning of the season, my runs aren't that many, I can do this for fifteen days or so and compare the aggregate to see how far off it is. Usually well within five percent. A battery that needs to be replaced will be all over the map.


This is the one I've used when I'm interested.  If you start and end the day in the same place and you don't hike for turns this works great.  Stevens Pass has (or had) all of the vertical rise statistics for their lifts on their trail map, or you can find the stats online if you search hard enough.  Just keep track of how many times you rode each chair and add it all up at the end of the day.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Why keep score in baseball? Why not just enjoy the nice weather?

Some people enjoy scores.

 

Personally, I'd rather enjoy the nice weather, even when I'm one of the players.  This is why people don't want me on their softball team...

post #19 of 20

I use ski tracks and I never look at vertical - only mileage.

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbooker View Post

Sorry for the naive question but as I have a self imposed ban on phones during holidays I can't use the mountain apps to calculate how much skiing I've done.

Is it as simple as logging which runs you've done each day and then multiplying them out with the vertical rise of each run?

Yes.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How to calculate daily vertical without technology.