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Powder Ski Ideas

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I just moved to Colorado and skied my Dynastar Cham 97 for the rest of the season here in April, May and June. The couple times where we're skied boot deep stuff my skis did pretty well but they felt heavy. The Chams carve beautifully in all other conditions.

I am now looking at a wider ski in the 105-110 range and possibly wider. At this time the Soul 7 and Nomads are what I am looking at due to deing light weight but I am interested in other ideas. Should weight even be considered.

I do like steeper and sometimes bumped trails, get into the woods from time to time. Love to rip wide bowls. 6 feet 195 and an advanced skier.
post #2 of 16
Since you're talking about resort skiing, a heavier ski will do better, since most of the time you will ski tracked powder.

The cochise and the katana are great skis.
post #3 of 16

Maybe the Fischer Ranger 108?

post #4 of 16
What resorts do you frequent?

You already have a daily driver type ski. Are you looking for a ski for big days or a wider daily driver ski that will see use for both stormy days and a few days after a storm?
post #5 of 16
Some of this is about budget, some about redundancy. But if the Chams felt heavy, and you want a ski more purely for soft snow, the current Super 7 comes to mind. Gives you significantly more float than the the Chams, more guts than the Soul 7, big envelope (can make an intermediate happy but will stand up to an expert wanting quick maneuvering in soft snow), and great prices right now. Next season's will have stiffer sidewalls, prolly better as big mountain ski, which is what everyone really wants when they talk about a "powder ski," but slightly less fun in bumps and trees and actual powder, I'd bet. The Supernatural 108 might also be worth a look. Little beefier than the Souls 7, also very cheap right now. Not that impressed with the current Soul 7, nice ski, really sweet in right spots, but maybe overmatched for advanced skier.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

What resorts do you frequent?

You already have a daily driver type ski. Are you looking for a ski for big days or a wider daily driver ski that will see use for both stormy days and a few days after a storm?

We got the Epic Local Pass so Breck, Keystone and A Basin and some days at Vail and Beaver Creek. We will also hit up Park City and Loveland.
Edited by dskifanatic - 7/5/16 at 9:25pm
post #7 of 16

Second the Katana - floats and does rough crud both.   The Cochise doesn't float, but is great in crud. The Super 7 floats but is more work in chop/crud.  

 

(Last year's mostly black Katanas 14/15 are identical to this past year's 15/16 mostly white model, at half the price, generally.  As soon as the 16/17 models come out, the price of both the previous ones will drop further.) 

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski otter View Post
 

Second the Katana - floats and does rough crud both.   The Cochise doesn't float, but is great in crud. The Super 7 floats but is more work in chop/crud.  

 

(Last year's mostly black Katanas 14/15 are identical to this past year's 15/16 mostly white model, at half the price, generally.  As soon as the 16/17 models come out, the price of both the previous ones will drop further.) 

 

They look to be fully rockered - I had a pair of Chopstix that were fully rockered and they did not turn all that well on the run outs or other groomed runs that were required.  Is that the case with these as well.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dskifanatic View Post
 

 

They look to be fully rockered - I had a pair of Chopstix that were fully rockered and they did not turn all that well on the run outs or other groomed runs that were required.  Is that the case with these as well.


You need to ski them. It is most certainly NOT the case with these as well. 

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dskifanatic View Post
 

 

They look to be fully rockered - I had a pair of Chopstix that were fully rockered and they did not turn all that well on the run outs or other groomed runs that were required.  Is that the case with these as well.

No, these carve as powerfully and stabily as most any Volkl, with the characteristic Volkl edge feel, wonderful, and easy to handle for an edge junky.   The fully rockered Volkl RTM 81 from a few years back was the ski on which I first discovered that Volkl knows how to do the no camber thing w/o harming edge/carve turns or run outs.   A bit of playfulness is the main thing I notice with these skis versus their cambered Volkl brothren.   

 

The only other thing I did notice with the Katana's no camber, at first, is at very slow speeds on packed green slopes, a slight adjustment was needed, for me:  I have at times unconscously used the camber of other skis to rebound a bit for edge carve, to make a lazy green slope turn.   Once I noticed I couldn't do that with the no camber Katanas, I adjusted, and it went back to a subliminal slight adjustment that worked well on such slopes: just a touch more rebound or whatever from me instead of from the ski camber.   On all other slopes and conditions, it's a non-factor, in my experience, over the past year using these as my main soft snow ski.   

post #11 of 16

Bigger skis most definitely can feel heavier.  I think it is this heavier mass much more than the width which makes them feel slower edge to edge.  Lightness in the tip and tail helps tremendously with a powder ski.  A more ball of foot center mount will also make the same ski feel lighter.

 

Mass does contribute to stability in skiing cut up snow and why it is sometimes desirable.  For me, I prefer a lighter, stiffer ski with good dampening than a heavier ski.

 

The mentioned skis sound good.  The Blizzard Bodacious would be my pick of the litter, but that is mostly because I know the product line and it suits me.

post #12 of 16
Do you mean powder ski or do you mean wider daily driver? I know you say you are light but plenty of people in Colorado ski a 100- 110 ski most days then a full powder ski when the storms hit.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post

Do you mean powder ski or do you mean wider daily driver? I know you say you are light but plenty of people in Colorado ski a 100- 110 ski most days then a full powder ski when the storms hit.

Wider daily driver hence considering Soul 7 or Ranger

My Dynastar Cham 97s do pretty well. Wide shovel that is really rockered helps a lot. They are heavy and busted through tracked snow really well too.

I found a pair of Dynafit HUASCARAN that are 114 underfoot are 186 length and are 4 pounds per ski which is really light. Icelantic Nomads I have demoed and they are a lot of fun. Atomic Automatics seem nice too. Price point is a big factor. I can get the Dynafit skis for $267 right now. ATOMIC for $400.
post #14 of 16

Dynafits are a touring ski - I've never skied them and they are likely to be on the "freeride"end of the touring spectrum but I'd question whether they are really designed for ploughing through resort chop and crud.  Atomics probably a solid bet even without trying them because a) they are well reviewed and b) resale value probably strong.

post #15 of 16
I was in a similiar boat. I was looking for a more playful resort powder ski to pair with my 85mm cambered skis. Im into the tricky flippy stuff off of natural features so remember thT as i list the skis i considered (and bought)

My list was
-shreditor 112
-soul 7
-super 7
-atomic automatic 117
-atomic bentchetler
-armada jj

Of these skis, i ended up buying the soul 7. The katana seem pretty much perfect for what you want and i would avoid the dynafit. The dynafit will probably be fun in the untracked but will give out for a resort pow day.

The soul/super 7's are fun skis that most any skier can be happy with. They are playful, yet hold a edge. And they float quite nicely. I would reccomend the 188 in the soul's and 180 or 188 in the supers. The main difference i felt was the supers float a touch better but the souls were a lot more fun everywhere else.
post #16 of 16

If you are talking about the Autos 117, they will work well, but optimally more as a soft snow ski than a daily driver, though they could do this if you really like wide skis.  They do kill groomers.  It's just that on more skied off days you'd probably use your Chams.    

 

At your height and weight, though, this ski is best long: probably the longest available, the 19x.  At ~150 lbs & 5'10", for me the 186 works best, but the 19x would work too.  

 

Also, mounting point is critical, and changes the ski amazingly.   You'd usually want to mount it forward, preferably with an adjustable binding you plan to move routinely and in small, consistent increments (Marker Schizo, Marker demo binding - both of which have metal screw slots that adjust easily).

 

 This is because this super powder ski was designed to include also big mountain and all mountain, with several mounting position sweet spots for different uses/size skiers.   At 0, the 186 for me does hero "big turn" charging through soft bumps, variable and chop; at ~+1.5 to +2, it turns faster, tighter, carving or smearing through pow, groomers, bumps and variable.  There are a bit better variable/rough skis, but if you can adjust the binding forward and back, you can find a variable snow sweet spot right for you, probably - if the ski is long enough.   Then possibly switch position for other conditions and styles of riding (from surf turns [~+2.5 to +3.5] to tight carve or smear turns to bigger carve or smear turns).   This ski also handles both slow and speed.  


Edited by ski otter - 7/12/16 at 11:36am
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