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New England Spring Break [college student in FL, intermediate, visiting friends in NYC]

post #1 of 53
Thread Starter 

Hello all!

 

I am a college student looking to plan a spring break trip with friends.  I realize that it is quite a while before my break (March 13th), but I am eager to begin planning and saving.  I am an intermediate skier with experience only in North Carolina and West Virginia.  My favorite destination so far is Snowshoe, WV.  I thought the mountain-top resort was beautiful and the skiing was plentiful for the short time I spent there.  I am comfortable on blues and I am trying to push to the next level. 

 

For my spring break, I am planning on driving from Florida to New York to visit friends.  While up there, I figure I would be close enough to head more north for a couple days of New England skiing.  I am looking for a large resort with long blue squares and some black diamonds.  I also enjoy terrain parks.  I do not know if I am willing to drive as far as Jay Peak or Stowe, so somewhere a little closer would be ideal (New York or Southern Vermont).  As a student, my funds are limited so costs may be a factor, but I can live with big resort prices.  I don’t get to ski often so I want the fullest experience I can get.  However, I’d really appreciate tips on how to save money with certain resort packages or personal saving advice.  What resorts should I consider for my spring break trip?  If you could list and compare some ski areas, it would really help (weather, villages, ski lifts, crowds, and price)!  Thanks in advance!

post #2 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post
 

Hello all!

 

I am a college student looking to plan a spring break trip with friends.  I realize that it is quite a while before my break (March 13th), but I am eager to begin planning and saving.  I am an intermediate skier with experience only in North Carolina and West Virginia.  My favorite destination so far is Snowshoe, WV.  I thought the mountain-top resort was beautiful and the skiing was plentiful for the short time I spent there.  I am comfortable on blues and I am trying to push to the next level. 

 

For my spring break, I am planning on driving from Florida to New York to visit friends.  While up there, I figure I would be close enough to head more north for a couple days of New England skiing.  I am looking for a large resort with long blue squares and some black diamonds.  I also enjoy terrain parks.  I do not know if I am willing to drive as far as Jay Peak or Stowe, so somewhere a little closer would be ideal (New York or Southern Vermont).  As a student, my funds are limited so costs may be a factor, but I can live with big resort prices.  I don’t get to ski often so I want the fullest experience I can get.  However, I’d really appreciate tips on how to save money with certain resort packages or personal saving advice.  What resorts should I consider for my spring break trip?  If you could list and compare some ski areas, it would really help (weather, villages, ski lifts, crowds, and price)!  Thanks in advance!


Welcome to EpicSki!  It's certainly not too soon to start planning for a spring break ski trip.  When I was taking my daughter for a spring trip, our plans were always set by the time school started.

 

How did you learn to ski?  Although I'm in NC, I ski more in northern VA than the NC or WV mountains.

 

Have you ever looked at OnTheSnow?  There is a resort finder that might help you come up with a short list.

 

Are you going to New York City or farther upstate?

post #3 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 


Welcome to EpicSki!  It's certainly not too soon to start planning for a spring break ski trip.  When I was taking my daughter for a spring trip, our plans were always set by the time school started.

 

How did you learn to ski?  Although I'm in NC, I ski more in northern VA than the NC or WV mountains.

 

Have you ever looked at OnTheSnow?  There is a resort finder that might help you come up with a short list.

 

Are you going to New York City or farther upstate?

I'm from Florida so I did not grow up with winter activities.  I actually did not ski until college.  My first time was only a few years ago when I planned a trip up to Beech Mountain, NC with friends.  I didn't want to spend money on lessons at the time, so I learned completely on Youtube.  With that I was skiing blues on my first trip!  I try to ski at least once every year and go to bigger, better resorts each time.  

 

I actually spend a bit of time on OnTheSnow every so often.  I just wanted to get a more personal answer about some resorts.  We'll be spending a few days in NYC so we are looking at skiing either upstate NY or Vermont for a couple days.  I have been looking at Whiteface, Okemo, and Killington in particular, but I am up for other suggestions. 

 

Thanks, marznc!

post #4 of 53

I would suggest Okemo out of the options above. Okemo is a true intermediate's mountain, with excellent grooming and moderate slopes. Killington is much bigger, with a lot more difficult terrain. And Whiteface is just as far from NYC as Stowe. 

post #5 of 53

Not much going on other than skiing, but Gore fits the bill as a mostly blue square mountain with some expert terrain as well.  About a 4 hour drive north from NYC. 

post #6 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post
 

I'm from Florida so I did not grow up with winter activities.  I actually did not ski until college.  My first time was only a few years ago when I planned a trip up to Beech Mountain, NC with friends.  I didn't want to spend money on lessons at the time, so I learned completely on Youtube.  With that I was skiing blues on my first trip!  I try to ski at least once every year and go to bigger, better resorts each time.  

 

I actually spend a bit of time on OnTheSnow every so often.  I just wanted to get a more personal answer about some resorts.  We'll be spending a few days in NYC so we are looking at skiing either upstate NY or Vermont for a couple days.  I have been looking at Whiteface, Okemo, and Killington in particular, but I am up for other suggestions. 

 

Thanks, marznc!

 

Welcome FloridaSki! 

 

Are you skiing alone? If so (or if you're willing to take a some time away from your friends) I'd highly recommend an intermediate lesson. It sounds like you picked up things pretty quickly, but it's also easy to develop some bad habits that even a single 1 hour lesson could help you avoid. 

 

I'm still an intermediate, and I've taken a few lessons the last couple of seasons. I don't ski that many runs that are any harder than I used to, but I have a lot more fun on them now, and ski them a lot better. And if you're looking to progress to more difficult terrain, lessons are a huge help.

post #7 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post

Welcome FloridaSki! 

Are you skiing alone? If so (or if you're willing to take a some time away from your friends) I'd highly recommend an intermediate lesson. It sounds like you picked up things pretty quickly, but it's also easy to develop some bad habits that even a single 1 hour lesson could help you avoid. 

I'm still an intermediate, and I've taken a few lessons the last couple of seasons. I don't ski that many runs that are any harder than I used to, but I have a lot more fun on them now, and ski them a lot better. And if you're looking to progress to more difficult terrain, lessons are a huge help.

Thanks, dbostedo!

My friends will be joining me on the ski getaway. I do fear developing bad habits so I will definitely consider lessons this time around, especially if I have more than a single day on the slopes. Do you know resorts that offer decent lesson packages at reasonable prices?
post #8 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

I would suggest Okemo out of the options above. Okemo is a true intermediate's mountain, with excellent grooming and moderate slopes. Killington is much bigger, with a lot more difficult terrain. And Whiteface is just as far from NYC as Stowe. 

Thanks, freeski919!

I am strongly considering Okemo for its difficulty of terrain and closer proximity to NYC. I also want to factor the pricing of lift tickets at each resort. Do you or anyone know of any 2 day ski deals for Okemo? Through either the resort or through Liftopia? I am a college student driving all the way from Florida so I'm on a budget and hoping to find discounts.
post #9 of 53
Quote:

Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post

 

I'm from Florida so I did not grow up with winter activities.  I actually did not ski until college.  My first time was only a few years ago when I planned a trip up to Beech Mountain, NC with friends.  I didn't want to spend money on lessons at the time, so I learned completely on Youtube.  With that I was skiing blues on my first trip!  I try to ski at least once every year and go to bigger, better resorts each time.  

 

I actually spend a bit of time on OnTheSnow every so often.  I just wanted to get a more personal answer about some resorts.  We'll be spending a few days in NYC so we are looking at skiing either upstate NY or Vermont for a couple days.  I have been looking at Whiteface, Okemo, and Killington in particular, but I am up for other suggestions. 

 

Thanks, marznc!

Sounds like you have have been bitten by the ski bug pretty hard!  The last time you were at Snowshoe, did you ski any of the blacks?  What about Western Territory?  As you probably figured out, a blue at Beech is not the same as a blue at Snowshoe.  A few of the blues at Whiteface are harder than most blacks in the southeast, both steeper and a lot longer.

 

From a budget standpoint, you should consider the smaller places or those that don't advertise as much.  For instance, Gore is actually bigger than Whiteface.  Pico is right next to Killington but more than enough for a few intermediates.  I assume the lesson prices are relatively low.

 

Here are a few trip reports from the 2014-15 season.  There was a lot more snow than the past season.  Impossible to know what you'll find in March 2017.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/133902/pico-vt-winter-never-ends-3-29-2015

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/134376/killington-trip-report-norbeaster-spring-skiing

 

Even during spring break, the slopes near NYC will be a lot less crowded midweek.  Take a look at Belleayre and Hunter.

 

I added a few tags under Topics Discussed (right hand column in Desktop mode).  They are links to EpicSki Resort Pages.  Scroll down to the bottom to see a list of relevant threads.  OnTheSnow is good for comparing mountain stats (acreage, vertical, etc.) for a given state.

post #10 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post


Thanks, freeski919!

I am strongly considering Okemo for its difficulty of terrain and closer proximity to NYC. I also want to factor the pricing of lift tickets at each resort. Do you or anyone know of any 2 day ski deals for Okemo? Through either the resort or through Liftopia? I am a college student driving all the way from Florida so I'm on a budget and hoping to find discounts.

Okemo has college student rates. They were $59/day midweek nonholiday this past season. It'll probably go up a couple bucks for next season. And definitely buy online, online price is always cheaper than window price. 

post #11 of 53

Might pick up some ideas from one of @Jonathan Keller trip reports.  He lives in NYC and got hooked on skiing a few years ago.  Improved quickly because he was skiing almost every weekend.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/127601/april-19-20-jay-peak-vermont

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Keller View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

Killington is also what I consider a "destination resort."  The price of the lift tickets at Stowe and Killington reflect the type of lifts and infrastructure available.

 

Put Gore and Whiteface on your list.  Be interested to see what you think of the speed of those lifts. :) 

My list for next year, not counting areas I have already been to:

 

Gore, Whiteface, Bellaerye, Plattekill, Sugarbush, Sugarloaf, Okemo, Snow, Stratton

 

Of the mountains I was at this year, I'll rank them how much I liked them:

 

Stowe

Jay

Windham

Killington

Hunter

Mountain Creek

post #12 of 53

FloridaSki,

 

In this thread I listed estimated travel times to several ski areas from central NJ.

http://www.epicski.com/t/74990/new-england-from-new-jersey/0_100#post_1923493

 

It should not be difficult to change the starting location to your location in the NYC area.  It should help get you a general idea of distance/time from NYC area. 

 

(I am using Yonkers when I am giving times from NYC, where you leave from NYC will have an affect on travel times)

 

In the Catskills (within 2-3 hours from NYC) there are 4 large areas Belleayre, Hunter, Plattekill, and Windham.  Of the four, I favor Belleayre and Plattekill.  Less crowds than the other two and they have decent amount of intermediate terrain.

 

In MA, Butternut, Berkshire East and Jiminy Peak are  between 2½-3 hours from NYC.

 

Gore is about 3½-4½ hours from NYC and Whiteface is about 4-5 hours from NYC.

 

Pico mountain is in central VT (next to Killington) and less than 4½ hours from NYC.

 

Jay Peak in northern VT is about 6 hours from NYC.  Bretton Woods in NH is about 5½ hours from NYC as a point of comparison.

 

In southern VT there are Stratton, Mount Snow, Magic, and Bromley. All between 3-4 hours from NYC.

 

I will let more knowledgeable people speak about the VT areas and Gore/Whiteface.

 

One thing I do recommend is to be somewhat flexible since the weather may play a role in were you decide to go ski.

 

Wish you well in your decision and hope you have a great trip.


Edited by GreyPilgrim - 6/21/16 at 9:21am
post #13 of 53

For a budget, Butternut was offering $20 or $25 lift tickets during midweek.  I do not know if it will continue next season, but something to keep in mind.  It is also about 2½ hours from NYC.

 

If you are flexible, liftopia can find some decent deals.  You may also wish to look at state websites. IskiNY had $12 lift tickets for Jan 28, 2016 at several ski areas in NY.  Perhaps you can find good bargains in this route.

post #14 of 53
Check out Berkshire East
post #15 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post
 

Hello all!

 

I am a college student looking to plan a spring break trip with friends.  I realize that it is quite a while before my break (March 13th), but I am eager to begin planning and saving.  I am an intermediate skier with experience only in North Carolina and West Virginia.  My favorite destination so far is Snowshoe, WV.  I thought the mountain-top resort was beautiful and the skiing was plentiful for the short time I spent there.  I am comfortable on blues and I am trying to push to the next level. 

 

For my spring break, I am planning on driving from Florida to New York to visit friends.  While up there, I figure I would be close enough to head more north for a couple days of New England skiing.  I am looking for a large resort with long blue squares and some black diamonds.  I also enjoy terrain parks.  I do not know if I am willing to drive as far as Jay Peak or Stowe, so somewhere a little closer would be ideal (New York or Southern Vermont).  As a student, my funds are limited so costs may be a factor, but I can live with big resort prices.  I don’t get to ski often so I want the fullest experience I can get.  However, I’d really appreciate tips on how to save money with certain resort packages or personal saving advice.  What resorts should I consider for my spring break trip?  If you could list and compare some ski areas, it would really help (weather, villages, ski lifts, crowds, and price)!  Thanks in advance!

 

It sounds like you have one week off in March, a long drive to NY that will use up some of those days, and friends who will want to do stuff in NY other than skiing while you're there.  This leaves you maybe TWO DAYS of skiing with those friends. 

 

If you are only going to ski two days, make sure those days are in the middle of the week.  Mid-week is less crowded, meaning no lift lines, and cheaper lift tickets.  If you take a group lesson on a mid-week day (cheaper than a private lesson), you may be the only person in that lesson because there aren't many people on the mountain.  That means you might learn more.  If you can convince your friends to take a semi-private lesson with you and split the price, that's another option.  Here's a question that may help you make up your mind about whether to take a lesson or not:  do your friends ski at your level?  If they ski at a higher or lower level, you can take some time away from them to get your lesson.  If they are at the same level as you, all of you might enjoy taking a semi-private.  But if you drive up and back and only spend one night there, you might end up not skiing bell to bell (are you big party people who will need to sleep in the morning of day two?)  If that's the case, you may want to skip the lesson thing altogether and just go have fun exploring together once you get to the mountain.

 

If you are not planning on spending two-three nights, you do need a short drive so you can rent your equipment and get on the snow as early as possible after driving up.  Where will you be leaving from, and did I guess right about spending only one night in the mountains?  Also, is partying after skiing important to you?  Do you think you'll go bar-hopping after the first day, or do you anticipate dropping off to sleep fast after an athletic day on snow?  Is a hot-tub where you stay enough for apres?

 

Summing up, here are my questions from the above ramblings; your answers might help people steer you to the right place:

1.  Can you plan your ski days so they are mid-week (Mon-Fri)? 

2.  Will you be spending only one night near the mountain, and driving up and back on those two ski days?  Or will you splurge and spend at least two nights up there?

3.  Where in NY is your point-of-departure?  How many hours of driving do you think you want to do in each direction?

4.  Is apres-ski partying important to you and your friends?  If so, you'll want a ski area with an access road or town that caters to such activities.  

5.  Will your friends be similar in skill to you, or vastly different?  If they are highly skilled and own their own equipment, will they want to have black terrain to play on at that mountain?  Will anyone need a beginner lesson?

post #16 of 53

Great feedback in this thread.  From everything I've read Okemo or Mt. Snow sound like best candidates for a couple days of skiing.  Hunter wouldn't be bad either if just one mid-week day.  March can be iffy about good snow conditions/weather in southern New England, those three have excellent snowmaking and grooming to improve odds of good conditions.

post #17 of 53

The key question is if you're skiing weekend or mid-week.  If weekend resorts like Mount Snow and Okemo will be crowded and expensive.  I would opt for Berkshire East as it's one of the few mountains that is not too crowded on the weekend, and very convenient to NY.

 

If you're going mid-week then a bigger mountain would be a great choice.

post #18 of 53


Just considering terrain, Stratton — the cruisers are wider than Okemo's, which is nice when you're intermediate, and the resort's almost as big. I don't love the vibe there (or at Okemo, for that matter), and it's pricey, but it's good learning.  

 

I'll throw in a pitch for my home mountain, too — Mt. Sunapee in Newbury, NH. It's small, but the terrain is interesting (some of which an intermediate would find challenging), and it's not hard to get to.  I can't speak to lodging or the bar scene, though.

post #19 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Sounds like you have have been bitten by the ski bug pretty hard!  The last time you were at Snowshoe, did you ski any of the blacks?  What about Western Territory?  As you probably figured out, a blue at Beech is not the same as a blue at Snowshoe.  A few of the blues at Whiteface are harder than most blacks in the southeast, both steeper and a lot longer.

From a budget standpoint, you should consider the smaller places or those that don't advertise as much.  For instance, Gore is actually bigger than Whiteface.  Pico is right next to Killington but more than enough for a few intermediates.  I assume the lesson prices are relatively low.

Here are a few trip reports from the 2014-15 season.  There was a lot more snow than the past season.  Impossible to know what you'll find in March 2017.

http://www.epicski.com/t/133902/pico-vt-winter-never-ends-3-29-2015

http://www.epicski.com/t/134376/killington-trip-report-norbeaster-spring-skiing

Even during spring break, the slopes near NYC will be a lot less crowded midweek.  Take a look at Belleayre and Hunter.

I added a few tags under Topics Discussed (right hand column in Desktop mode).  They are links to EpicSki Resort Pages.  Scroll down to the bottom to see a list of relevant threads.  OnTheSnow is good for comparing mountain stats (acreage, vertical, etc.) for a given state.

Haha I would say I definitely have the ski bug! I did actually ski a couple blacks of Snowshoe Basin. I didn't get a chance to check out the Western Territory since I only skied a single day. I found them challenging but doable. For this coming trip, I am looking to get more comfortable on similar runs up north whether they are blacks or difficult blues. Since natural conditions are tough to predict, I will probably look at resorts with decent snow making capability.
post #20 of 53

Lakespapa,

 

A good suggestion, depending on how far the OP wishes to travel.  That ski area is about 4½ hours from NYC (Yonkers) area to Sunapee

 

I like the trail map.  I will add Sunapee to the list of places in the New England New Jersey thread.

post #21 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

It sounds like you have one week off in March, a long drive to NY that will use up some of those days, and friends who will want to do stuff in NY other than skiing while you're there.  This leaves you maybe TWO DAYS of skiing with those friends. 

If you are only going to ski two days, make sure those days are in the middle of the week.  Mid-week is less crowded, meaning no lift lines, and cheaper lift tickets.  If you take a group lesson on a mid-week day (cheaper than a private lesson), you may be the only person in that lesson because there aren't many people on the mountain.  That means you might learn more.  If you can convince your friends to take a semi-private lesson with you and split the price, that's another option.  Here's a question that may help you make up your mind about whether to take a lesson or not:  do your friends ski at your level?  If they ski at a higher or lower level, you can take some time away from them to get your lesson.  If they are at the same level as you, all of you might enjoy taking a semi-private.  But if you drive up and back and only spend one night there, you might end up not skiing bell to bell (are you big party people who will need to sleep in the morning of day two?)  If that's the case, you may want to skip the lesson thing altogether and just go have fun exploring together once you get to the mountain.

If you are not planning on spending two-three nights, you do need a short drive so you can rent your equipment and get on the snow as early as possible after driving up.  Where will you be leaving from, and did I guess right about spending only one night in the mountains?  Also, is partying after skiing important to you?  Do you think you'll go bar-hopping after the first day, or do you anticipate dropping off to sleep fast after an athletic day on snow?  Is a hot-tub where you stay enough for apres?

Summing up, here are my questions from the above ramblings; your answers might help people steer you to the right place:
1.  Can you plan your ski days so they are mid-week (Mon-Fri)? 
2.  Will you be spending only one night near the mountain, and driving up and back on those two ski days?  Or will you splurge and spend at least two nights up there?
3.  Where in NY is your point-of-departure?  How many hours of driving do you think you want to do in each direction?
4.  Is apres-ski partying important to you and your friends?  If so, you'll want a ski area with an access road or town that caters to such activities.  
5.  Will your friends be similar in skill to you, or vastly different?  If they are highly skilled and own their own equipment, will they want to have black terrain to play on at that mountain?  Will anyone need a beginner lesson?

Hey, LiquidFeet!

I have read several horror stories about long lift lines and crowds obstructing slopes. I will definitely plan my trip during the week. Most likely Wednesday and Thursday. I plan on staying at least two nights so that we may take advantage of the short time we have. So I will also be looking for inexpensive lodging near the mountain. We will be driving up from Brooklyn and probably won't want to drive more than 4-5 hours. Apres-ski is somewhat important since most mountains close in the mid afternoon. We are up for anything whether it's a bar, shopping area, hot tub, or even just good outdoor areas for exploring. I don't think we will have trouble finding the latter. The majority of us are intermediate skiers and riders with the exception of two beginners. So a resort with a good lesson program would be ideal.
post #22 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post

Haha I would say I definitely have the ski bug! I did actually ski a couple blacks of Snowshoe Basin. I didn't get a chance to check out the Western Territory since I only skied a single day. I found them challenging but doable. For this coming trip, I am looking to get more comfortable on similar runs up north whether they are blacks or difficult blues. Since natural conditions are tough to predict, I will probably look at resorts with decent snow making capability.

Keeping on top of conditions a couple weeks in advance of your trip will be important, no matter what your short list ends up.  For a solo safari to VT in early March a couple years ago, I opted to drive farther north because there was a snowstorm predicted for southern VT.  I was driving my NC minivan with all-weather tires, not good on snowy roads.  I had researched my short list so knew where I could get a decent motel room at short notice.  Ended up having a great time at Pico, Sugarbush, and Mad River Glen.  Note that I'm an older advanced skier (retired) so can have a good time at MRG.  For an intermediate, Sugarbush is a fun resort with very good snowmaking.

 

Keep in mind that even places with good snowmaking may or may not use all that capability come mid-March.  The season in the northeast pretty much ends for most ski areas by early April no matter how much snow is on the ground.  There simply aren't enough paying customers.  Also true out west and even for Snowshoe some years.

 

I have no doubt that you'll be able to get down easy blacks in the northeast.  Just know that without a lesson, you will be developing bad habits because of survival skiing.  May not make a difference while you are young, but could become an issue in later years.

 

At the very least, please learn the tips about protecting your knees during a potential fall.

 

http://www.vermontskisafety.com/kneefriendly.php

post #23 of 53

Now that I remembered my day at Sugarbush, I remembered a planning thread from last year.  It was created by an organized young man in high school.  It's worth reading the entire thread to see how the situation changed given the lousy winter weather last season.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/142868/where-to-go-for-ski-vacation-in-new-england/60

 

Hopefully next season will be more normal, but never hurts to be forewarned of what can happen.  Note that when it rained in southern VT last winter, sometimes Whiteface was behind the cold front and had pretty decent conditions.  Lake Placid is a fun town any time of year.  But Whiteface is not a good choice for beginners and intermediates.  Gore is a better fit.  Could find some fun in North Creek, but it's a small town.

post #24 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post
 
[snip]
Since natural conditions are tough to predict, I will probably look at resorts with decent snow making capability.

I learned a lot about snowmaking reading the profiles for the I AM A SNOWMAKER contest that's been going on for a few years.  Definitely worth keeping the nominees in mind for an early season trip.

 

http://www.hkdsnowmakers.com/snowmaker.asp

 

Cataloochee in NC, Stowe and Okemo in VT were nominees for 2016.  Smuggler's Notch (near Stowe) and Loon in NH were nominated in previous years.  My home resort, Massanutten, in northern VA was also nominated.  One year I spend a few days skiing in early Dec.  Went to Loon partially because of the snowmaking capability.  Ended up skiing there two days because nothing else nearby had enough open to be interesting, even for just cruising groomers.

post #25 of 53

Hey there FS.  If you're going midweek than my Berkshire East suggestion isn't necessary.  In addition as you say apres ski is important, there isn't much there for that.

post #26 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaSki View Post


Hey, LiquidFeet!

I have read several horror stories about long lift lines and crowds obstructing slopes. I will definitely plan my trip during the week. Most likely Wednesday and Thursday. I plan on staying at least two nights so that we may take advantage of the short time we have. So I will also be looking for inexpensive lodging near the mountain. We will be driving up from Brooklyn and probably won't want to drive more than 4-5 hours. Apres-ski is somewhat important since most mountains close in the mid afternoon. We are up for anything whether it's a bar, shopping area, hot tub, or even just good outdoor areas for exploring. I don't think we will have trouble finding the latter. The majority of us are intermediate skiers and riders with the exception of two beginners. So a resort with a good lesson program would be ideal.

 

To give you info on Okemo, there are a number of places in Ludlow that you can stay cheaply mid-week, so that shouldn't be a huge issue. Also there are a number of bars and restaurants in town that offer some good apres. The Loft is literally at the base of the mountain, but isn't owned by the mountain. There were many, many afternoons that I wandered in there around 4:30, and didn't leave til last call. 

 

To give full disclosure, I worked at Okemo for 3 years. That's why I happen to have more info about Okemo than some other places. I also happen to think Okemo is just about ideal for what you're looking for, even if it is no longer the type of resort I'd go out of my way to visit. 

post #27 of 53

Stratton is a good sugggestion too.

VT can be expensive for lodging.  You'll do good if you have a group of 3 or 4 or more and split costs in lodges/motels.  If just one or two you might consider hostels and can search here for that word.  Here is one thread that includes the suggestion of Turn of the River Logde/Hostel at Killington, which is also a fine intermediate and aspiring advanced mtn.

http://www.epicski.com/t/108621/hostels-or-cheap-clean-motels-in-southern-and-central-vermont

 Up near Sugarbush there is Hostel Tevere, also a good place.

post #28 of 53

Your best bet is Gore, Mt Snow or Stratton. Mt Snow and Stratton are very similar to Okemo, but Okemo adds 30 plus minutes to your drive and can be more expensive than even Stratton or Mt Snow. Stratton and Mt Snow are the full on resort experience. You might be able to even book some slope side lodging at either Stratton or Mt Snow for a reasonable rate. Gore is a more rustic, yet no less fun type of skiing. There is no slope side lodging at Gore, but there is a little town with some fun restaurants and bars. There is plenty of lodging within 1 mile of the Gore access road. The lodging at Gore is generally cheaper vs Mt Snow or Stratton.

 

The skiing at Stratton is generally a little steeper than Mt Snow, but both places will be great for you. Gore also has a ton of intermediate trails a some serious expert trails. As long as we don't have a repeat of last winter, all 3 should be fully open when you go next March. All 3 will be pretty empty mid week in March with Gore having the least number of people on the slopes. All three areas have multiple high speed lifts.

 

Do not go to Whiteface. It has the least amount of intermediate terrain when compared to most of the bigger Eastern areas. While the Catskill areas in NYS are a lot of fun, I would drive a couple of hours further to Gore, Mt Snow or Stratton to really enjoy skiing some long intermediate cruisers.

post #29 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post


The skiing at Stratton is generally a little steeper than Mt Snow, but both places will be great for you.

Let's clarify a little. None of the big southern VT resorts (Mt Snow, Stratton, Okemo) have anything that would be considered actually steep. While one may be marginally steeper than the other, they are all very tame mountains. There's nothing on any of those mountains that an intermediate would be in genuine trouble on.
post #30 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post


The skiing at Stratton is generally a little steeper than Mt Snow, but both places will be great for you.

Let's clarify a little. None of the big southern VT resorts (Mt Snow, Stratton, Okemo) have anything that would be considered actually steep. While one may be marginally steeper than the other, they are all very tame mountains. There's nothing on any of those mountains that an intermediate would be in genuine trouble on.

Totally, unless it's solid ice.
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