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Where is the world's best skiing terrain? - Page 2

post #31 of 51

I don't recall any thread in the past where people have to defend enjoying light snow over heavier stuff.  Usually, if it happens at all, it's the opposite.   The world is upside down!

post #32 of 51

Perhaps I am too old school on this topic but "Love the One You're With".

 

If you can't giggle and grin on anything, maybe you're doing it wrong. If it is steep enough to keep you moving and the snow hasn't started dripping, life is pretty darned good.

 

I copter guided in the early days up in the Chugach, spent winters in Colorado, Utah, Montana, Washington, Idaho (and a bunch of other snowy places). The very best I have seen so far is all of it. Granted, the terrain in the above mentioned places is better than the  Dakotas or Wisconsin, but really not sure the skiing was actually more fun. 

 

Enjoy what you are skiing and look forward to the next place.

post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post
 

Perhaps I am too old school on this topic but "Love the One You're With".

 

If you can't giggle and grin on anything, maybe you're doing it wrong. If it is steep enough to keep you moving and the snow hasn't started dripping, life is pretty darned good.

 

I copter guided in the early days up in the Chugach, spent winters in Colorado, Utah, Montana, Washington, Idaho (and a bunch of other snowy places). The very best I have seen so far is all of it. Granted, the terrain in the above mentioned places is better than the  Dakotas or Wisconsin, but really not sure the skiing was actually more fun. 

 

Enjoy what you are skiing and look forward to the next place.

 

Drippy snow can be fun in the right circumstances. ;)

post #34 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

I don't recall any thread in the past where people have to defend enjoying light snow over heavier stuff.  Usually, if it happens at all, it's the opposite.   The world is upside down!

What people are talking about is snow that is so light and dry that it take several feet to cover what's underneath.  Nobody's complaining about the snow, just that there isn't enough of it. Six inches of dust on crust isn't that great, although it's a whole lot better than crust on crust. Staying on lower angle stuff helps in that kind of snow.  It's true that it takes a lot less depth if a storm starts out warm and wet and winds up cold and dry--typical california snow, except that last year warm and wet mostly meant rain, and cold and dry meant cement.  Wet switching over to dry is what I order when I order snow but usually I wind up skiing whatever happens to fall. (Unless it's raining--then I get to stay home and sip scotch switching over to bourbon. Privilege of age and being able to ski every day if I want. I'll let y'all ski in the rain.)

post #35 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 
 The Intermountain ranges in the US are primarily the Wasatch and Tetons, and in Canada the Selkirks and Monashees.   Does this type of snowpack exist outside North America?   Perhaps in some high altitude pockets in the Alps, the Caucasus or the Japan Alps above the lifts as mentioned by markojp?  Nothing else comes to my mind.  If you live within easy striking distance of the above 4 mountain ranges in North America, the grass is NOT greener somewhere else IMHO.

My data collection is limited, but I like this argument.

 

Thenk yew! :D

post #36 of 51

Gotta agree with Tony on that score.

 

So long as there is a base, 6 inches of light on crust is a wonderful thing.  I'll take new snow over 5 inches so long as there is a base or at least enough of a base to work with over almost any snow condition excepting wind depot on skied powder or corn.   Skied Crested Butte March 30th and 31st this year.  3-5 inches new each day on the second lowest snow season in their history (it was crust).  The snow was mostly pixie dust as it was wonderfully cold.  I was in heaven.  Dust on crust with hardly anyone out.

 

In terms of the Maritime snow, over 10 inches does not affect skiing depth too much (make sure you have the pitch), but it does affect what gets covered and avalanche conditions.

 

Back to Beyond's point.  I was being internet passive aggressive with Tyler.  I knew his answer before he gave it, but good for him stepping up.  Apologies Tyler, your lack of skiing should not be a reason for me shutting you down.

 

Beyond you left out Telluride and Silverton in your list.  Skied Silverton April 1 this year which was the first unguided day after a foot of snow during the rest days.  Bluebird day with cool temperatures to start, but the sun was high so looking around as day went on.  Biggest mountain ski feel I have had lift served.   

 

Thought about this a bit and by best I think it would need some steep treed terrain.  If it is a mountain that can only be appreciated a limited number of days, then that would disqualify it for me as the best terrain.  Above treeline is subject to wind, heavy snow, in the clouds, avalanche risk.  This takes away many days of skiing.  Having long, steep treed runs greatly expands the days that can be skied.  Since I KNOW I don't live by the world's greatest skiing terrain I want a descent shot at skiing the greatest terrain when I am there.

post #37 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineac View Post

Gotta agree with Tony on that score.

So long as there is a base, 6 inches of light on crust is a wonderful thing.  I'll take new snow over 5 inches so long as there is a base or at least enough of a base to work with over almost any snow condition excepting wind depot on skied powder or corn.   Skied Crested Butte March 30th and 31st this year.  3-5 inches new each day on the second lowest snow season in their history (it was crust).  The snow was mostly pixie dust as it was wonderfully cold.  I was in heaven.  Dust on crust with hardly anyone out.

In terms of the Maritime snow, over 10 inches does not affect skiing depth too much (make sure you have the pitch), but it does affect what gets covered and avalanche conditions.

Back to Beyond's point.  I was being internet passive aggressive with Tyler.  I knew his answer before he gave it, but good for him stepping up.  Apologies Tyler, your lack of skiing should not be a reason for me shutting you down.

Beyond you left out Telluride and Silverton in your list.  Skied Silverton April 1 this year which was the first unguided day after a foot of snow during the rest days.  Bluebird day with cool temperatures to start, but the sun was high so looking around as day went on.  Biggest mountain ski feel I have had lift served.   

Thought about this a bit and by best I think it would need some steep treed terrain.  If it is a mountain that can only be appreciated a limited number of days, then that would disqualify it for me as the best terrain.  Above treeline is subject to wind, heavy snow, in the clouds, avalanche risk.  This takes away many days of skiing.  Having long, steep treed runs greatly expands the days that can be skied.  Since I KNOW I don't live by the world's greatest skiing terrain I want a descent shot at skiing the greatest terrain when I am there.

No worries. I own it. I've always said my role on EpicSki isn't to be the most knowledgeable poster or lead the community in the way Phil and Tricia did. My job is administrative, I do all the stuff that people don't see that keeps EpicSki online. I'm more in the mold of @AC who founded EpicSki. I have an interest in it, I like creating discussions like this, but my background is more in the technical side of the site rather than content generation.
post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Perhaps I am too old school on this topic but "Love the One You're With".

If you can't giggle and grin on anything, maybe you're doing it wrong. If it is steep enough to keep you moving and the snow hasn't started dripping, life is pretty darned good.

I copter guided in the early days up in the Chugach, spent winters in Colorado, Utah, Montana, Washington, Idaho (and a bunch of other snowy places). The very best I have seen so far is all of it. Granted, the terrain in the above mentioned places is better than the  Dakotas or Wisconsin, but really not sure the skiing was actually more fun. 

Enjoy what you are skiing and look forward to the next place.

eek.gif WHAT???!!!! Did I read that correctly? You are questioning the right of any individual on this site to post a hypothetical scenario which generates endless (and pointless) debates on the merits of one's own opinions?

Herecy, I tell you.
post #39 of 51

Wait a minute!!!:hijack:, I thought this thread was about terrain!  Terrain & vertical has always been my #1 qualifier for the 'best skiing" & is why I bothered posting in this thread in the first place.  Any mountain with great terrain & vertical is gonna have variable conditions most of the time.  If you can't learn to enjoy many different snow conditions, IMO you are really missing out on what the mountain experience is really all about :dunno.  Everyone who rates the quality of their ski experience by how much deep powder skiing they had, are setting themselves up for disappointment.

BTW,  @tylrwnzl good topic.

 

All you powder dreamers need a different thread, cuz unless you're gonna risk your life in the backcountry, rob a bank & go heliskiing, Squat at the front of the line on one of the worlds few truly great lifts for the season & endure freezing temps, hunger, exhaustion, unimaginable winds & lack of visibility,... that dream is over (I resemble all of these BTW ;)).  The powder dream ended with the advent of snowboarding & fat skis about 25yrs. ago :mad.

 

Now that the snow factor is set aside & we can really dream, I always thought Mt. Diablo had some pretty sweet terrain :D...


Edited by 4ster - 6/22/16 at 3:03pm
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 

Wait a minute!!!:hijack:, I thought this thread was about terrain

I posted a similar thought a while ago but was set straight by the OP that he really meant snow and terrain.

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

I posted a similar thought a while ago but was set straight by the OP that he really meant snow and terrain.

Oops, well that disqualifies Diablo.  I'm back to Shasta FTW then, it's got it all :D.

post #42 of 51

This is interesting .

i have'nt been all around the world so ...

i can not  compare asian mountain himalaya etc .

But the andies should be one of the best terrain .

strange no body wrote about it .

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochileros View Post
 

This is interesting .

i have'nt been all around the world so ...

i can not  compare asian mountain himalaya etc .

But the Andes should be one of the best terrain .

strange no body wrote about it .

Quote = Tony Crocker:
In the Southern Hemisphere once you get far enough south in NZ or Chile those mountains don't have as much skiable vertical as Alaska either.  Where the Andes are tall the latitude is low and the snowfall extremely erratic.

 

I don't believe "terrain quality" can be completely extricated from snow.   It's obvious when comparing Mt. Diablo, which rarely has any snow to Mt. Shasta which has plenty.   In far northern Chile it's so dry that even at 20,000 feet there's hardly any snow.

 

Obviously there are gray areas, and that applies particularly to big vertical mountains where skiing on the upper parts can be quite consistent but is rarely any good on the lower parts.  But the bottom line to me is that you can't argue for best ski terrain when that terrain is rarely skiable due to inadequate snow coverage or unacceptable avalanche risk. 

post #44 of 51

If you dropped the current wilderness boundaries in CO, there would be some excellent terrain, with no shortage of snowfall, in the former Zirkel, Weminuche, West Elk, and Eagles Nest areas. 

post #45 of 51
You can already ski all those wilderness areas, under your own power.
post #46 of 51

Yes, you can. You can ski anywhere under that mindset. 

Of course, if your goal is to actually get into the interior of those places from December to May, I wish you luck. 


Edited by COBillsFan - 6/27/16 at 8:02am
post #47 of 51

Reading about all of these far flung mountain ranges got me wondering. Has anybody here ever skied the Brooks Range in Northern Alaska? I haven't or do I remember anyone who had.

 

It is the 1st mountain range off of the Arctic Ocean so there should be snow and the late spring skiing could be amazing (lift service will be a bit limited) a copter would be the only way to do this, but there has GOT to be something of interest here.

 

post #48 of 51

I suspect the Brooks Range gets very little snow.  The Arctic Ocean is frozen in winter and thus not a water source.  Plus air that cold can't hold much water vapor anyway.

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

I suspect the Brooks Range gets very little snow.  The Arctic Ocean is frozen in winter and thus not a water source.  Plus air that cold can't hold much water vapor anyway.

It should have a fair number of storms coming in from the Baring Straights and North Pacific; and if there is anywhere in North America capable of holding snow this should be it.

 

This is what wikipedia says about the climate in the Brooks. 

"While other Alaskan ranges to the south and closer to the coast can receive 250 inches (640 cm) to 500 inches (1,300 cm) of snow, the average snow precipitation on the Brooks Range is reported at 30 inches (76 cm)[8] to 51 inches (130 cm).[9]

As measured at the Anaktuvuk Pass weather station (elevation 770 metres (2,530 ft)), the average summer temperatures are 3 °C (37 °F) as a low and 16 °C (61 °F) as a high. During the winter the average low is −30 °C (−22 °F) while the average high is −22 °C (−8 °F).[9]"

There could be some amazing corn snow in late Spring early Summer.

post #50 of 51
Quote = stranger:
the average snow precipitation on the Brooks Range is reported at 30 inches (76 cm)[8] to 51 inches (130 cm).[9]

Factor in low water content, wind and no trees for shelter, and there's unlikely to be much in the way of a skiable snowpack with that meager snowfall.  Except where there are glaciers, which present their own hazards.

post #51 of 51
From all the places I've been, powder highway was unbelievable
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