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girls or womens ski? [beginner adult in Australia]

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

Im a female beginner weigh 58kg 160cm tall, bought a second hand pair armada Makai 143 twin tip width 3" in the middle and 4" on both ends, did some research on this model realizing they're "girls" skis, but would that be ok for me anyway considering im def a matured "woman" haha! I mean what r the diffs btwn girls n womens skis? cant really find any articles about it.

 

thanks a million

C LO

post #2 of 13
Thread Starter 

also my  boots fit perfectly to the bindings when bought 

post #3 of 13
You are roughly the size of my daughter (29), so to me you're certainly in the adult category. Since you are a beginner, the length is probably okay for one season (depending on how long your season is. Will you ski five days or forty?). But, not sure if a lightweight kids ski is right even for a beginner. I actually think the decreased control could interfere with your progression. FWIW, my daughter, an excellent skier, just got skis that are women's in a 169. So, I'd have thought you should be on like a 158.

Also, get the shop to check the binding set up for forward pressure and DIN. If they are kids skis, I'm sure they are set for a kid's weight as well.

I can't imagine these skis will meet your needs after one week of skiing, but maybe someone more knowledgeable about this particular model can chime in.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

thanx for your time, I really appreciate your comment, I pick this particular length because a few professionals suggest for beginners, length should be between my nose and chin, which they are, also I will be working there, so I would imagine maybe 2-3 days max in a week, but now I might need to do some more research and reconsider.

 

thanx again

post #5 of 13
You see, if you're renting, it's fine for the ski to be so short. But initially you will progress fairly quickly to a point where you are no longer a complete beginner. When you say 2-3 days max in a week, do you mean that that is then your "season", or 2-3 days EACH WEEK for four months? If we're talking 2-3 days PER YEAR, then really you will be unlikely to progress beyond these skis. But if you're saying 2=3 days each week, then you'll be past those skis half way through the season. Which is why at the beginning rental skis make more sense. Then when you hit the intermediate stage, you look around for your own skis. Maybe around level 4 or 5. (Descriptions here: https://www.aspensnowmass.com/while-you-are-here/see-all-guides/guide-to-lessons )
post #6 of 13
By the way, for a real hair-splitting description of ski levels, look no further than this thread
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cornbread View Post

I do believe these lists have some merit in addition to their use at the ski school. All sports have some way of measuring their participants' ability level and skiing to me and many others is a sport and not just a recreational outing. Yeah, skiing is fun but so is golf and I along with most golfers know what our handicaps are even if most of us participate at a recreational level. It has less to do with ones ego or bragging rights and a lot more to do with knowing ones ability and where one stands with the best out there. Who is going to question a single digit handicap golfer’s intentions when they state their ability? Do you think they are boasting or inflating their ability for doing so? I happen to think that it is a great and well deserved accomplishment.


As has been mentioned, this subject comes up quite often and there are many lists out there that tend to inflate the ability levels or are quite vague at the upper levels. I posted the following list at another site a couple of weeks ago. I compiled the info from the best lists out there along with what has previously been suggested at EpicSki including the idea that there are sub-levels among the upper tiers. As all lists, it can be subjective and open to some level of interpretation. Still, it is a good guide listing the abilities and/or limitations that one would be expected to have at that particular level. I think most skiers of any level could look at it and comfortably say, “that’s me” with a reasonable amount of accuracy.


For those of you who think such ideas are worthless or ridiculous, that’s cool. Move on, have fun skiing, and don’t concern yourself with it. For those of you that see a value in such things, please offer suggestions or ways to improve the list.


Never Ever: Level 0

Beginner: Level 1: J-turns to connected wedge turns on Bunny Slope

Beginner: Level 2: Connected wedge turns on Easy Greens, stop in a wedge, capable of riding surface lift

Novice: Level 3: Controlled wedge turns on all Greens, capable of riding and exiting all lifts

Novice: Level 4: Controlled wedge turns and beginning to finish with a skidded parallel on Easy Blues

Intermediate: Level 5: Start turns with a slight wedge but finish turns in a skidded parallel, can stop using a “hockey stop”, upper body still follows skis, turn shape and speed are constant, less than ideal conditions are still very challenging, can ski at this level on all groomed Blues and Easiest Blacks in best conditions

Intermediate: Level 6: Skis mostly in a skidded parallel, beginning to use a pole plant, upper body beginning to face down fall line, can vary turn shape and speed, beginning to use edges during turn, struggles on ice and heavy snow, skiing off well groomed slopes is a rarity and extremely challenging, can ski at this level on groomed Harder Blacks in best conditions

Advanced: Solid Level 7: Good parallel form with pole plant, upper body mostly faces down fall line, capable of using edges on all groomed slopes in most conditions at moderate speed, capable of keeping downhill ski on edge throughout turn, beginning to weight and un-weight ski, has achieved a fair amount of athleticism and conditioning, beginning to ski off-piste, can ski at this level on groomed Hardest Blacks in less than ideal conditions

Advanced: Top Level 7: Comfortable venturing off-piste but is challenged in moderate moguls and light powder, beginning to explore other off-piste disciplines, can ski on un-groomed Hardest Blues and Easiest Blacks in best conditions

Advanced: Low Level 8: Very good parallel form, understands mechanics of the turn, very good upper and lower body separation, weights and un-weights skis, upper body faces down fall line, skis “cross” or “swing” under body, can make carved connected railroad tracks by keeping both skis on edge throughout the turn on all groomed trails in all conditions at high speed, has good athleticism and conditioning, is challenged by several off-piste disciplines, can ski off-piste at this level on the Hardest Blacks in slightly less than ideal conditions

Advanced: Solid Level 8: Skis most off-piste areas and disciplines well at moderate speed, skis bumps of various size and shape well, skis powder well, skis trees, skis open bowls, capable of hiking and difficult traverses, can self arrest, beginning to ski toughest snow conditions off-piste where weaknesses are revealed, can ski off-piste on Easiest Double Diamonds in best conditions

Expert: Top Level 8: Excellent dynamic parallel form, adjusts weighting of skis according to conditions, can ski 90% of the terrain, in 90% of the conditions, 90% of the time at any resort mountain, struggles in very few areas, can ski at this level on Harder Double Diamonds in less than ideal conditions

Expert: Low Level 9: Skis with high confidence and ability on all but the hardest terrain in all but the most difficult conditions, has high athleticism and conditioning, weaknesses are revealed only in the most extreme terrain and conditions, can ski the most exposed Hardest Double Diamonds in the best conditions

Expert: Solid Level 9: Extremely knowledgeable and skilled on the mountain including back country, very few weaknesses if any, is capable of coaching and guiding anyone, is confident and comfortable in any situation, skis where falling is not an option on the most exposed Hardest Double Diamonds in less than ideal conditions, Skis Anytime, Anything, Anywhere, Any Condition, Any Speed

Elite/Rock Star: Top Level 9/10: Off the chart, a true Ski God/Goddess and world class athlete, Skis Sick Terrain!!! Sick Conditions!!! Sick Speed!!! Sick Style!!!
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 


thanx for your such informative reply, I will be there for 6 weeks at least, I looked at their rental price per day dont think i have that kind of budget, but I will definately start considering other options out there cheers

post #8 of 13

@cherrypie, don't forget to have those bindings set by a professional in a shop.  Bindings are more complicated and more important than beginners realize.

Getting them set correctly matters for your safety.  And enjoy skiing!

post #9 of 13

At the demo ski centre where I work we size skis for beginners around the skier's chin, intermediates get chin to eyebrows length, and advanced skiers get a length above the eyebrow height. HOWEVER, these are skis that are made for adults who weigh over 100lbs. Kid's skis are made for very lightweight skiers and I would only put the very most petite of women on a kid's ski and then only as a last resort because her feet (ski boots) are too small to fit an adult binding set up.

 

The advice about getting a ski shop to set up the bindings is a must do.

 

Edit: There can also be compatibility issues with adult boots and kids bindings.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherrypie View Post
 

Hi all,

 

Im a female beginner weigh 58kg 160cm tall, bought a second hand pair armada Makai 143 twin tip width 3" in the middle and 4" on both ends, did some research on this model realizing they're "girls" skis, but would that be ok for me anyway considering im def a matured "woman" haha! I mean what r the diffs btwn girls n womens skis? cant really find any articles about it.

 

thanks a million

C LO

Quote:
Originally Posted by cherrypie View Post
 

thanx for your time, I really appreciate your comment, I pick this particular length because a few professionals suggest for beginners, length should be between my nose and chin, which they are, also I will be working there, so I would imagine maybe 2-3 days max in a week, but now I might need to do some more research and reconsider.

 

thanx again

Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm guessing you will not be skiing in North America.  Where are you going to be working?

 

I'm an older woman who is more petite that you are.  When I started to ski more after retirement I got a pair of skis that were 149cm.  I was an intermediate who had learned to ski as a teen but didn't ski much as a working adult.  I never considered getting skis designed for girls.  Based on my daughter's experience as she learned to ski, you will probably outgrow short skis (below nose) fairly quickly.  Especially if you take a few lessons.

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the precious comments! I am wrapped! maybe i'll return this one n get longer ones, and rent for the first couple of days, as renting the whole way is just not economical for me. season in Mt Hotham Victoria Australia is about to start, I cant wait! thanx again for sharing experiences, much appreciated! cheers!

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherrypie View Post
 

Thanks for all the precious comments! I am wrapped! maybe i'll return this one n get longer ones, and rent for the first couple of days, as renting the whole way is just not economical for me. season in Mt Hotham Victoria Australia is about to start, I cant wait! thanx again for sharing experiences, much appreciated! cheers!


In the U.S., it's possible to do what is called a "season lease."  Often a good way for kids or adults just getting started to have gear the first season without paying daily rental fees.  With that type of lease, it's possible to change skis during the season.

 

Let us know how it goes once you get at Hotham. :)

post #13 of 13

Have a great season @cherrypie...Mt Hotham rocks!

 

Mt Hotham 2008 season.

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