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Help identify antique skis!!?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

I found a pair of skis and boots in my attic. Can someone please help me identify what they are?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 10

Well, the skis, obviously are Head Standards. Date to very early 60's. Used to own similar setup; mine were Head Standards and a Marker toe, cable heel with front clampdown, leather thongs for wrapping around the boot top. Very popular ski in its day, not rare, and yours is not in good condition. So "antique" is stretching it. The boots look like Rachle's perhaps? Again, not antiques. 

post #3 of 10
Agree both are 60's vintage. Looks like stuff I learned on. Unfortunately, much of what I remember from my youth is considered antique these days. 🙁
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Agree both are 60's vintage. Looks like stuff I learned on. Unfortunately, much of what I remember from my youth is considered antique these days. 🙁


They are considerably upscale from what I learned on. I am talking wood skis, screw-on edges, bases barely good for a season, and leather lace-up boots.

post #5 of 10
Actually, they are metal skis. That was Howard Head's innovation, to put layers of metal on the wood core to increase torsional rigidity.

As to value, they were so popular that they are not very rare. However, these are early and complete with binding and boot. Looks like good condition and would clean up well. Are they short (sub 200)? I'd say $150-$200 for the set retail in an antique shop. Not worth more than $50 to people on epicski I wouldn't think.

Worth a lot more to Bruce Thomson from Canada

Clean them up and put them in your den. Your wife will love them 😗
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Miles View Post
 


They are considerably upscale from what I learned on. I am talking wood skis, screw-on edges, bases barely good for a season, and leather lace-up boots.

 

Nope.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonD999 View Post

Actually, they are metal skis. That was Howard Head's innovation, to put layers of metal on the wood core to increase torsional rigidity.

Looks like good condition and would clean up well. Are they short (sub 200)? I'd say $150-$200 for the set retail in an antique shop. Not worth more than $50 to people on epicski I wouldn't think.
 

Yep (he also was first ever to introduce rubber under the metal). Nope. Look at the shots showing the front cable release and shovel. Massive topsheet chipping and beveling. Seriously, who would pay $50 for those? An sports antique dealer that stocks for Applebees might shrug and pull out a $20. Unsure they were ever made as short as 200. Recall 210 or so as the normal length.

 

FWIW, these not only were popular, they were the pleb version. The Comp was the racing ski, ran successfully in several World Cups and Olympics. May have taken gold, not sure. Then I think in the 60's they introduced different colored inscribed logos for the Masters (blue as I recall) and the Competition (yellow I think). They might bring $100 for a really clean setup. Then the Comp became the 360, an intermediate's dream. I owned the Standard, purchased around 1958 or 59, then the Masters, purchased around 64? Then the shiny red Killy 800, fondly and universally cited as the worst ski ever made. :yahoo: RIP, all. 

post #7 of 10

Boots are fairly modern since they have buckles. Like someone else mentioned my first boots were double laced (inside/outside). My boots were Molitors. Also the boot tree is fairly modern since it has a spring loaded handle. My first boot tree had wing nuts for tightening the boot to the tree. I still have both on top of the fireplace at our ski house.

post #8 of 10

Boots could be Henke, wonder whatever happened to them.  Leather boots with buckles was really a bad idea, but I guess it got us to plastic boots with buckles.

post #9 of 10


I'm sorta leaning to Kastinger for the boots.  I think I had a pair and those look familiar.  As to the Head Standards,  they were one of the best skis of their era.  When the ski shop I worked in got to be Head dealers, our future was assured (the shop name still exists over 50 years later).  Someone asked about th length of the skis shown.  I tried to read the length, it's on the skis above the owners name, but couldn't make it out.  The Standard was not sized in metrics, but in feet and inches.  I remember them starting at 6', then 6'3", 6'6", 6'9", 7', 7'3".  They probably made at least a 5'9" and maybe shorter too.   In addition to the Standard there was a Powder model, they were all pretty long and very soft.  USFS Snow Rangers bought them from us for their back country skis.  Used a cable binding, regular toe piece (likely Marker or Salomon) and a Marker touring attachment.  The touring attachment was a bear trap toe that fit over a screw in the sidewall and could be put on or taken off as needed.  Not as good as a modern AT binding, but effective and easy to use.


Edited by JTNSKIS - 5/28/16 at 9:53am
post #10 of 10

I can't imagine paying even a dime for any of that. If I wanted a pair of skis over my mantle (which I don't--I have a Rembrandt [poster]) I would be looking for some unpainted wood skis--a lot older than those. There are many, many more old skis in the world than uses for them. Oh, I suppose someone might want to ski them once for old times sake, but they'd be risking their tibias unless they replaced the bindings. Now if you find an old manual typewriter that might be worth something. Some people still use those, I'm told.

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