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Edgewise Tuning Closing

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Just got an email from Graham that he is closing the shop. Edgewise was one of my two trusted tuners, the other being SkiMD. Graham just invested in a very expensive high end Montana race tuner, so this is surprising. Does anyone know if the shop will operate with a new owner, or is everything being sold off?
post #2 of 18

Just read that EVO.com has bought them and the site will remain open.

post #3 of 18

Smart on their part. Never had a chance to use them but always wanted  to! I received a email saying 50% of everything starting June 1.

post #4 of 18

Can you send the article link about Evo buying Edgewise.  I was planning to use them at the end of the summer to grind / bevel some skis. Hope they will stay in business and the owner or head grinder will stay on.

 

I have been on a quest to have a shop "grind" a 0.5 degree base bevel onto a  pair of my skis. So far the best I have received is a 0.70 from SkiMD. SkiMD tells you right up front he won't do a 0.50 but will do a 0.70. He says 0.70 is what his machines are set for and he does a huge volume and isn't going to re-adjust his machine for one pair of skis. His work is outstanding, so its hard to fault him for this approach. Every other shop I have tried has agreed to do a 0.50 and not produced it. the best I have seen (not from SkiMD)  is a consistent 0.75 bevel when I measure it with a true bar and feeler gauges. The shop tech actually told me he measured the skis and they were at 0.5 just before I picked them up. It would have been interesting to actually measure them with him to find out why we get a difference. I am a mech. engineer and feel pretty confident that I am measuring them correctly (0.5 angle is .020" gap at 60 mm distance from edge of ski, or equivalently, 1 deg is 1 mm gap at 60mm).

 

Anyway, Edgewise will base bevel a 0.5 degree angle on their automated machine and I am ready to make the trip to try them out. Hopefully it is still possible. 

 

I am also going to speak to SkiMD and probably have him do my skis with 0.0 base bevel and do the 0.5 myself at home. Only drawback on that I see is hand filing and diamond stoning doesn't seem to produce the same smooth finish the ceramic disks produce. Not to start anything, but this is what I see under magnification.  I am not going to spend all day stoning my edges to get them as perfect as a machine job.  I do file and diamond stone my side edges, cause that is a regular repeat thing for me. Since they are not the bottom, I am not so concerned with the finish, just the sharpness.


Edited by bttocs - 5/27/16 at 7:24am
post #5 of 18

Seattle, WA – Seattle-based action sports and outdoor retailer evo announced the purchase today of Denver, Colorado businesses Edgeworks and The Bicycle Doctor. Joining forces to expand in Colorado connects evo’s ecommerce and retail innovation with Edgeworks’ local convenience, service, and expertise. The partnership between evo and Edgeworks will provide Colorado skiers, snowboarders, mountain bikers, and cyclists with an enhanced retail experience to shop online or in store, pick up orders for free, streamline service work, and get exceptional guidance in purchasing or servicing their gear.

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post
 

Can you send the article link about Evo buying Edgewise.  

 

 

 

Local Denver media outlets covered it so it should be on your favorite outlet.  Or you could just go to Evo.com

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by skihound View Post

Seattle, WA – Seattle-based action sports and outdoor retailer evo announced the purchase today of Denver, Colorado businesses Edgeworks and The Bicycle Doctor. Joining forces to expand in Colorado connects evo’s ecommerce and retail innovation with Edgeworks’ local convenience, service, and expertise. The partnership between evo and Edgeworks will provide Colorado skiers, snowboarders, mountain bikers, and cyclists with an enhanced retail experience to shop online or in store, pick up orders for free, streamline service work, and get exceptional guidance in purchasing or servicing their gear.

Thank you that was the reference I was looking for.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post
 

Can you send the article link about Evo buying Edgewise.  I was planning to use them at the end of the summer to grind / bevel some skis. Hope they will stay in business and the owner or head grinder will stay on.

 

I have been on a quest to have a shop "grind" a 0.5 degree base bevel onto a  pair of my skis. So far the best I have received is a 0.70 from SkiMD. SkiMD tells you right up front he won't do a 0.50 but will do a 0.70. He says 0.70 is what his machines are set for and he does a huge volume and isn't going to re-adjust his machine for one pair of skis. His work is outstanding, so its hard to fault him for this approach. Every other shop I have tried has agreed to do a 0.50 and not produced it. the best I have seen (not from SkiMD)  is a consistent 0.75 bevel when I measure it with a true bar and feeler gauges. The shop tech actually told me he measured the skis and they were at 0.5 just before I picked them up. It would have been interesting to actually measure them with him to find out why we get a difference. I am a mech. engineer and feel pretty confident that I am measuring them correctly (0.5 angle is .020" gap at 60 mm distance from edge of ski, or equivalently, 1 deg is 1 mm gap at 60mm).

 

Anyway, Edgewise will base bevel a 0.5 degree angle on their automated machine and I am ready to make the trip to try them out. Hopefully it is still possible. 

 

I am also going to speak to SkiMD and probably have him do my skis with 0.0 base bevel and do the 0.5 myself at home. Only drawback on that I see is hand filing and diamond stoning doesn't seem to produce the same smooth finish the ceramic disks produce. Not to start anything, but this is what I see under magnification.  I am not going to spend all day stoning my edges to get them as perfect as a machine job.  I do file and diamond stone my side edges, cause that is a regular repeat thing for me. Since they are not the bottom, I am not so concerned with the finish, just the sharpness.

 

Interesting about the base bevel issue. Seem to be a number of shops here that do custom bevels. Totem Pole in Ludlow uses a Montana Challenge for radial bevels (.4 under foot, .7 tip & tail), as well as straight bevels at any reasonable degree — just for one instance.  Maybe it's the race focus around here.

post #9 of 18
Edgewisee in Stowe and Edgeworks in CO are two different companies as far as I know. Not sure the Evo thing pertains.

As for a true .5 base bevel, if youre in VT you should try Peak Performance in Killington. If you go the route of doing it by hand, it will take all day to achieve the same level of polish, and likely be over beveled by the time youre done.

Also, what type of skis are they? I ask because the shape of the top sheet and any dampening plates can be a major factor in actually getting the ski truly flat. If the ski isnt flat edge to edge, youll never be abke to produce a true .5
post #10 of 18

From the Edgewise website on 5/27/16:

 

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothRides View Post

Edgewisee in Stowe and Edgeworks in CO are two different companies as far as I know. Not sure the Evo thing pertains.
 

 

You are correct, they are two different companies. I googled edgewise and EVO and found the same info. and wondered if there was confusion. But we have a double coincidence, both Edgewise and Edgeworks are no more.

post #12 of 18

Wow.  :-(

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothRides View Post

As for a true .5 base bevel, if youre in VT you should try Peak Performance in Killington. If you go the route of doing it by hand, it will take all day to achieve the same level of polish, and likely be over beveled by the time youre done.   Agreed, but I think I will try it and go easy on the polishing, seems to be most direct way to achieve it

Also, what type of skis are they? I ask because the shape of the top sheet and any dampening plates can be a major factor in actually getting the ski truly flat. If the ski isnt flat edge to edge, youll never be abke to produce a true .5  The latest skis I had ground were a new pair of Liberty Origin 96. They were unmounted and smooth on top. This has happened on over a dozen different skis my family owns. The new Liberty skis had a very good 1.0 / 2.0 tune from the factory (I measured them) and I had them ground to a 0.5 / 3.0.  I got a .75 / 3.0.  It was a good job other than missing the 0.5.  I suspect that was due to putting too much pressure on the file when cutting the 0.5 by hand. I plan to experiment with this myself on an old pair of skis before I do it on a new pair of skis. I want to make sure I know what it takes to produce the 0.5. It is such a small amount of metal coming off the edge, even with a good file and a bevel guide it think it is easy to take off too much. I expect you need a really lite touch on the file and just do a minimal number of passes.
I have read most of the tuning posts by Aman and Zentune and the others who do their own work and know their stuff. Getting a 0.5 base bevel with a file guide requires some "art" due to the small amount of material coming off. Basically a single pass with a file pressed really hard can remove more material than a .5 bevel requires. I believe you have to develop a "touch" for a very light cut and make minimal passes.  I will also measure my file guide to make sue it was machined correctly. 
post #14 of 18
Novice here at base beveling. But why not file to. 3, polish to. 5? Or something like that.
post #15 of 18

base angles are very low, compared to side angles. You start with zero on the base and then file in your angle. There are "file guides" or tools that hold your file at the angle and the smallest one made is 0.5.  Simple answer to your question is no one makes a 0.3 file guide. Your suggestion makes sense otherwise. The higher angles aren't hard to achieve (.7 and up). The 0.5 is about the minimum amount of material you can remove with a file, its easy to take to much off, even with a 0.5 file guide. You are at the limit of precision with hand tools. Surprisingly, when you are on boilerplate you can feel the difference between 0, .5, .75, 1.0, and by the time your get to 2.0, you will have "downhill" skis that don't turn at all.

 

There adjustable file guides, maybe those would work, but usually they are not very precise. The guides I mention above are "fixed" or one angle only. There maybe other ways to do it, such as putting a shim under a coarse diamond stone, but I am not aware of them. Just thinking out of the box.

post #16 of 18

Don't some people file base bevels by wrapping masking tape around the file to set the bevel?  With this technique I'd think you could possibly do a .3

post #17 of 18
I did 20 years ago!
post #18 of 18

Graham always had the highest tech equipment available but with high tech machines, comes high expense/overhead and when he made the switch to all Montana machines last year I wondered then if things were starting to maybe tighten up and if it was more of a financial strategy than anything.  Regardless, Graham is one of the best tuners out there and is a wealth of knowledge, hopefully he stays in the industry on some level.

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