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Broke my Leki poles.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I want a straight SL pole and I see there are two kinds one is a TBS. This poll seems to be heavier which one do I want for free skiing?
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

I want a straight SL pole and I see there are two kinds one is a TBS. This poll seems to be heavier which one do I want for free skiing?

 

How did you break the last pair?     The 18 mm is likely to be more resistant to simple bending.    The 16mm TBS with the thicker tube walls is likely to be more resistant to dent-then-break.    Otherwise, 10g weight difference is neither here nor there.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
I decided to have a yard sale out on the slopes at about 50 mile-an-hour cording to my ski tracks.
post #4 of 16

Ah, 'K.     So it wasn't one of those got-dented-by-the-airline type scenarios.      Maybe consider the Carbon 14 ?

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
And why would you suggest the carbon-14?
post #6 of 16

I'll play Devil's Advocate, having owned all possible types of poles. Carbon lasts about as long as that long-awaited vacation if you 1) use gates, or 2) ski in trees, or 3) tend to use your poles as all purpose tools, or 4) get involved in falls involving other people (my kids come to mind) skiing into you and your gear, or 5) take decent falls, eggbeaters etc, where your poles and skis may get up close and personal. One good edge cut will pretty much send your carbon poles to the dumpster. So I go for Leki WC's, fairly robust alu. Yeah, I know swing weight and all that. Truth is, I don't much notice when I'm concentrating on the right stuff when I ski. But others think it all begins and ends with swing weight. Different strokes...

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I'll play Devil's Advocate, having owned all possible types of poles. Carbon lasts about as long as that long-awaited vacation if you 1) use gates, or 2) ski in trees, or 3) tend to use your poles as all purpose tools, or 4) get involved in falls involving other people (my kids come to mind) skiing into you and your gear, or 5) take decent falls, eggbeaters etc, where your poles and skis may get up close and personal. One good edge cut will pretty much send your carbon poles to the dumpster. So I go for Leki WC's, fairly robust alu. Yeah, I know swing weight and all that. Truth is, I don't much notice when I'm concentrating on the right stuff when I ski. But others think it all begins and ends with swing weight. Different strokes...
While I was researching this I saw a lot of posts about how much more comfortable the carbon poles were and less tiring. I've been using Leki aluminium for 10-plus years and I have no idea what tiring or comfortable has to do with the ski poles . It's just a timing device for me and I don't even know it's there most of the time. Having said that the Leki SL TBS seemed interesting but I didn't want a pole that my hands would think was heavy. In addition if carbon is more fun easier to use and there's a difference I'd go with the carbon. Hard to decide but deals going on now/
Edited by levy1 - 5/23/16 at 7:18pm
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by levy1 View Post

And why would you suggest the carbon-14?

 

Of the three, it sounds like the carbon-14 would have been the most likely to survive the fall you did have.     @beyond's caution above is well taken if you intend to run gates.      OTOH I own CF poles with over 200 days of mixed pow/tree skiing (no gates, I have poles for that and guards therefor).     Do not confuse 100% carbon fiber poles with composite (essentially fiberglass or other fiber) poles - CF is far more sturdy and durable.

As to feel, carbon tends to be lighter (more flickable) and less...jarring when you stab a pole plant into ice.    But IME after a day or so one's hands get used to just about anything if there is no underlying injury or weakness or disability.     IOW when I went through my series of rotator cuff repairs CF was a godsend - now I don't care.

post #9 of 16

We've owned many pairs of Leki carbon poles and never broken anything but the tip which I could replace.

 

One of my key criteria is the diameter of the poles because I like to sit on them on the chair, so the smaller the better.

post #10 of 16

Generally speaking, good Al race poles should last.  Price is not the determining factor, when I purchase, Flex is.  The stiffer the pole, the likely it is the better Al both in material and in treatment, and will last longer as such.

 

My Kerma poles over 30 years (still counting), and my current Gabel Team poles just as good, just a little thinner and nice strap system.  Both selected by flex (little to none).

 

As to graphite poles, great strength, stiffness and low wt.  Downside, there is no slight damage, its either no damage or total failure.  Had a chance to buy neat shaped race poles from Dynastar a few years back in graphite, what stopped me was they were graphite.


Edited by oldschoolskier - 5/24/16 at 11:32am
post #11 of 16

I love my Leki Vario S adjustable poles, especially when I use my Leki mittens, which are great also.

 

Oldschoolskier is right- I broke the lower (graphite) shaft on one this season helping two kids get on a lift and Leki replaced the broken part very quickly with great customer service. They were only a season old.but I appreciate Leki helping me out even though the break was not a construction/quality issue.  

post #12 of 16
Way. Over. Thinking. This. If you're an advanced skier without any particular history of regularly breaking poles, then higher end carbon offers low swing weight, Light weight, etc... There are some fantastic AL poles that offer the same ( a la Scott). Go to the shop, pick out a size and make, swing it with as little effort as you can to feel the balance of the design, check if the grip works well with your glove and hand size, then buy them when you find the right pole, Leki makes great carbon poles. Some folks love the trigger grip, others not so much. Komperdell makes great poles, as do Goode, Scott, etc...

My more recent history for what it's W.

BD Carbon Flick Lock... I've owned a pair of these since their introduction many years ago. All parts are available through the manufacturer at reasonable cost if you break a component. I paid industry pricing for these. The first pair years ago were full retail and worth every penny.

Leki Vario Carbon. Nice poles, but I'm not that big a fan of the trigger grip. Doesn't disappear in hand like the BD flick locks, but these are excellent poles if you need/want adjustability. Again, paid industry pricing.

Komperdell carbon (bright green) race poles... These are fantastic recreational ski poles. Simple design, simple grip, absolutely disappear in hand, but IMHO, not stiff enough for rec racing starts, etc... My daily driver. The green makes it easy for students and clients to pick me out on the hill. These were free from the rep. (see my avatar for the product in use! smile.gif)

Goode carbon poles, the original 'pencil' shafts... Like the Komperdell's, light, robust, disappear in hand. I've had the same pair for 15 years and still use them or loan them out. The rubber grips are failing, but these have been superb. These were free from the rep.

All 4 above are great products. All four Are/have been used off piste, in trees, teaching, etc... I'm also a fan of, but don't own, a Scott AL pole. A bit heavier than Carbon, but a well designed grip, excellent balance and swing weight, etc... If I were paying full retail, even for $100, they'd be on my very short list. Anyhow... Good luck with your search Levy! There are many more than mentioned above that would fit your bill.
Edited by markojp - 5/24/16 at 4:12pm
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Way. Over. Thinking. This. If you're an advanced skier without any particular history of regularly breaking poles, then higher end carbon offers low swing weight, Light weight, etc... There are some fantastic AL poles that offer the same ( a la Scott). Go to the shop, pick out a size and make, swing it with as little effort as you can to feel the balance of the design, check if the grip works well with your glove and hand size, then buy them when you find the right pole, Leki makes great carbon poles. Some folks love the trigger grip, others not so much. Komperdell makes great poles, as do Goode, Scott, etc...

My more recent history for what it's W.

BD Carbon Flick Lock... I've owned a pair of these since their introduction many years ago. All parts are available through the manufacturer at reasonable cost if you break a component. I payed industry pricing for these. The first pair years ago were full retail and worth every penny.

Leki Vario Carbon. Nice poles, but I'm not that big a fan of the trigger grip. Doesn't disappear in hand like the BD flick locks, but these are excellent poles if you need/want adjustability. Again, payed industry pricing.

Komperdell carbon (bright green) race poles... These are fantastic recreational ski poles. Simple design, simple grip, absolutely disappear in hand, but IMHO, not stiff enough for rec racing starts, etc... My daily driver. The green makes it easy for students and clients to pick me out on the hill. These were free from the rep. (see my avatar for the product in use! smile.gif)

Goode carbon poles, the original 'pencil' shafts... Like the Komperdell's, light, robust, disappear in hand. I've had the same pair for 15 years and still use them or loan them out. The rubber grips are failing, but these have been superb. These were free from the rep.

All 4 above are great products. All four Are/have been used off piste, in trees, teaching, etc... I'm also a fan of, but don't own, a Scott AL pole. A bit heavier than Carbon, but a well designed grip, excellent balance and swing weight, etc... If I were paying full retail, even for $100, they'd be on my very short list. Anyhow... Good luck with your search Levy! There are many more than mentioned above that would fit your bill.

Me overthink? :D

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

I think I will go with the Leki carbon for free skiing and maybe the SL for nastar. I have two older sets of Leki aluminum but I like the trigger release better. I can ski up to the lift press 2 buttons and I am out!

My first pole break in about 20 years!

post #15 of 16
You mean you disconnect your poles from your hands?? Why? rolleyes.gif
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
So I can eat my salad!
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