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Has Anyone Skied Aggressively on a Total Knee-Replacement, a relatively modern one? - Page 2

post #31 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pavgypsy View Post

Had both knees done several years ago. Also had hips done.
I am 75 ,,going on 55!
Ski every day. In all but moguls!
What changed?
More technique,,,less muscular moves. I am a better skier now.
Must do more flexibility warm ups. Must learn to watch other skiers, since I have been hit twice due to " extreme skiers"!
Do not do power lifts,,,rather more lower weight reps.
Enjoy skiing.
Ski man

 

Thanks P! 

 

Tog, Whiteroom, & ScotSkier all said essentially the same and helped me get set up on a pair of skis to master the techniques.  I must confess, my current gear is antiquated.  Volkl P-9s.  So I've taken their advice and will be crashing letting the technology do the work for me.  I'm looking forward not to just enjoying skiing, but actually skiing again since I haven't been able to for several seasons now. 

post #32 of 38
May I suggest the following;
Not only get modern " shaped" skis, be careful not to be a sheep in the herd.
That is try out skis,,,many skis and then pick the ones for you.
Do not listen to the marketing hype.
Then,,,, get new boots.
You will understand once you put those two on a slope.
I let the skis do the work for me. Few fellow skiers know I have two new knees and two new hips. I never talk about it.
Just ski.
post #33 of 38
Thread Starter 

Thanks Pavgypsy!

 

I've already picked up a pair of one-season old Blizzard FIS Slalom skis, 165, in all but primo condition with Marker XCell 16 bindings for $400.  A good deal I thought. 

 

I picked up a pair of new Solomon boots in late spring too which fit like a dream, and considering my feet that's an achievement in and of itself. 

 

So I'm eager to get out this year.  The advice has been as you seem to suggest, get good equipment and let the equipment do the work, moreso than in the past with older technology. 

 

Thanks a bunch for the post!! 

post #34 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

 

That said, I'm going to inject a little bit of a discouraging tone here with regard to your flexion range of motion.  I'm not your doc or your physical therapist, I'm just some guy on the internet, but I'd be concerned if I had only 90 degrees of flexion at week 5.  Have you been progressively gaining on that number or have you plateaued?  Not sure from your original post, but I'm not sure if you had one replacement or both?  Doesn't really matter that much, but I'm just curious.

 

From my own experience, most of my flexion improvement came during weeks 2-4.  From then on, it was gradual but slight improvement.

 

Have you talked with your doc about where your range of motion is at this point?  If he/she is happy with where you are, then that's great.  I just feel that you will need at least 120 degrees of flexion to be able to ski at a relatively high level.  

 

One of the most "enlightening" experiences all of my tkr friends (and I) had was that first time getting on and off a chairlift.  That move forces a pretty dramatic degree of flexion on your knees and it was a bit of a revelation.

 

For me, getting improvement on flexion was by far the most painful part of the recovery process.  I did prone heel slides, sitting heel slides, and back-on-the-floor-with-feet-up-the-wall heel slides, all of which were aimed at improving flexion.  My PT had a resistance-band machine that did leg presses with progressively more flexion.  All of that hurt - a lot - but got me to where I have excellent flexion.

 

Have you been riding an exercise bike?  Another thing my PT did was have me start on an exercise bike with a very upright seat.  Once I could comfortably make full revolutions with my legs relatively extended (the seat really high), he started gradually lowering the seat so that I had more flexion.  My PT also did ultrasound treatments on the incision site as well as a lot of manual manipulation for increased flexion.  All of that was painful but it was also successful.

 

Sorry so be a little bit of a bummer, but I think you need to make sure your surgeon is okay with that degree of flexion.

 

Hey Bob,

 

An update, and largely motivated by your post. 

 

My Doc was originally not satisfied with my progress in RoM.  My therapist all but completely ignored RoM stating that he could get that back months later and that strength was the priority.  I trusted him, in hindsight, and after much "Googling," I have to wonder WTF he was studying in PT school. 

 

My doc was PO'd to the extreme, said it was in his script, which the therapist discarded and said he "knew what to do."  Doc scheduled a "Manipulation under Anesthesia" for me.  I asked if I might avoid it, he said that it would be a miracle if I could. 

 

Long story short(er), I went to another practice, a superlatively progressive one that's not on my insurance, and they worked me from about that 90 or so to 114 within 10 days.  Hurt like hell, but knee is now in the mid-100-teens if not better by now, and we are working on my hip.

 

I literally had to drop everything off of my schedule and do rehab full-time for a month and again, it hurt like hell, but the guy that spared me from the second procecure said that it would hurt three times as much for much longer if I had it and extend the rehab time out a couple more months. 

 

So, I'm a couple months behind but seemingly up-to-date.  He said he's not even concerned about my knee now, rather the hip(s).  Thanks so much for your shared concern, it helped!! 

 

Not happy with the original rehab people, particularly since they were part of the Winchester (VA) Valley Health Medical system/hospital.  But it goes to show you that just because they have credentials and accreditation does not mean that they know what they're doing. 

 

I think given my situation I'm going to ease back into skiing this fall, not try to race again or anything, at any level, and just enjoy and feel out the equipment, get my hips back into shape and enjoy the outdoors for a change. 

 

Having said that, I'm jacked to be able to do it again this fall and doubly-jacked to have new equipment. 

 

Anyway, I thought I'd update you and let you know that your insights were instrumental in my figuring this out!

post #35 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingmaster View Post
 

 

Hey Bob,

 

An update, and largely motivated by your post. 

 

My Doc was originally not satisfied with my progress in RoM.  My therapist all but completely ignored RoM stating that he could get that back months later and that strength was the priority.  I trusted him, in hindsight, and after much "Googling," I have to wonder WTF he was studying in PT school. 

 

My doc was PO'd to the extreme, said it was in his script, which the therapist discarded and said he "knew what to do."  Doc scheduled a "Manipulation under Anesthesia" for me.  I asked if I might avoid it, he said that it would be a miracle if I could. 

 

Long story short(er), I went to another practice, a superlatively progressive one that's not on my insurance, and they worked me from about that 90 or so to 114 within 10 days.  Hurt like hell, but knee is now in the mid-100-teens if not better by now, and we are working on my hip.

 

I literally had to drop everything off of my schedule and do rehab full-time for a month and again, it hurt like hell, but the guy that spared me from the second procecure said that it would hurt three times as much for much longer if I had it and extend the rehab time out a couple more months. 

 

So, I'm a couple months behind but seemingly up-to-date.  He said he's not even concerned about my knee now, rather the hip(s).  Thanks so much for your shared concern, it helped!! 

 

Not happy with the original rehab people, particularly since they were part of the Winchester (VA) Valley Health Medical system/hospital.  But it goes to show you that just because they have credentials and accreditation does not mean that they know what they're doing. 

 

I think given my situation I'm going to ease back into skiing this fall, not try to race again or anything, at any level, and just enjoy and feel out the equipment, get my hips back into shape and enjoy the outdoors for a change. 

 

Having said that, I'm jacked to be able to do it again this fall and doubly-jacked to have new equipment. 

 

Anyway, I thought I'd update you and let you know that your insights were instrumental in my figuring this out!


Hi, Wingmaster.

 

I'm really pleased to hear from you and that it's going the right way now.  It sounds like a tough comeback but you're making it.  Way to go!

 

If you're anything like me, you'll be truly amazed once ski season starts.

 

Not that I race at the same level as you, but I did race in our local league racing at Snow King resort the January following my May 25 btkr surgery.  The first race I was pretty tentative but by the end of the season I was skiing with the same level of aggressiveness (and pitifully poor technique) that I always did.

post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 


Hi, Wingmaster.

 

I'm really pleased to hear from you and that it's going the right way now.  It sounds like a tough comeback but you're making it.  Way to go!

 

If you're anything like me, you'll be truly amazed once ski season starts.

 

Not that I race at the same level as you, but I did race in our local league racing at Snow King resort the January following my May 25 btkr surgery.  The first race I was pretty tentative but by the end of the season I was skiing with the same level of aggressiveness (and pitifully poor technique) that I always did.

 

LOL

 

Thanks for the encouragement.  I hope you're right.  Would be nice to be skiing at a high level again soon. 

 

Quick question, did it take you a while to regain stability in your knee? 

 

I know it's solid, but every once in a while when I step oddly or have all my weight on my tkr knee, it feels as if it's going to dislocate.  I know that it's not because the hardware won't let it, but it feels odd anyway.

 

Ringing any bells? 

 

Mark

post #37 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingmaster View Post
 

 

LOL

 

Thanks for the encouragement.  I hope you're right.  Would be nice to be skiing at a high level again soon. 

 

Quick question, did it take you a while to regain stability in your knee? 

 

I know it's solid, but every once in a while when I step oddly or have all my weight on my tkr knee, it feels as if it's going to dislocate.  I know that it's not because the hardware won't let it, but it feels odd anyway.

 

Ringing any bells? 

 

Mark


Since I had both done at the same time, I'm not sure that I could discern any difference between the "corrected" one and the "natural" one.

 

That said, I think it's completely normal for your brain (unconsciously) to not completely trust the repaired knee.  Knee replacement is a big deal and your brain hasn't yet had enough time and experience to believe that the knee won't fail.

 

I think as time goes by and you experience more and more of the everyday little jolts and jars, you'll eventually come to truly believe that your new knee is as good as the natural one (or at least close enough).  I'm willing to bet that 6 months from now you'll only think about that knee when something or someone reminds you that you had a knee replacement.

 

You do know, I assume, that all the docs say that a major replacement like this actually takes 1 to 2 years to fully heal?  After a few months, the healing and the improvement are very minor and extremely gradual, but bones take that long to fully heal.  Give it time and you'll be fine.

post #38 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 


Since I had both done at the same time, I'm not sure that I could discern any difference between the "corrected" one and the "natural" one.

 

That said, I think it's completely normal for your brain (unconsciously) to not completely trust the repaired knee.  Knee replacement is a big deal and your brain hasn't yet had enough time and experience to believe that the knee won't fail.

 

I think as time goes by and you experience more and more of the everyday little jolts and jars, you'll eventually come to truly believe that your new knee is as good as the natural one (or at least close enough).  I'm willing to bet that 6 months from now you'll only think about that knee when something or someone reminds you that you had a knee replacement.

 

You do know, I assume, that all the docs say that a major replacement like this actually takes 1 to 2 years to fully heal?  After a few months, the healing and the improvement are very minor and extremely gradual, but bones take that long to fully heal.  Give it time and you'll be fine.

 

Actually, that 1-2 year thing is new to me but makes sense and stands to reason based on what I know about bone health, healing, etc. 

 

They've told me that at 6 months I'd be fine to do any activity I felt comfortable doing and that after a year it should be fully healed, but I can see how it might take a little longer.  Funny, I've been thinking to put off much more than acclimation to next (2017/18) season. 

 

I've downgraded my approach to this season.  Instead of getting too crazy, on euphoria, I'm going to take the advice given here by doing the immersion method of learning the new technology, something that everyone posting here is already past, and in simply getting my skiing muscles back into a state where they realize they're awake.  I'm very attune to technology and getting the most out of letting the "tools" do the work.  That's my goal, then I plan on getting a second pair of skis this winter, a longer pair, as long as I feel comfortable. 

 

I'm sure I'll stick to green and blue slopes or easy blacks, but I'll probably stick to top-o-the-morning groomed skiing for those purposes. 

 

At some point no doubt I'll hear my body asking for more.  I'm pretty sure that'll happen this season and then next season I'll think about pushing it a little bit more, possibly taking the family on that week-long ski vacation somewhere bigger, etc.  For this season perhaps a couple of long weekends in NY somewhere. 

 

I've been thinking about it more, what I really miss the most about skiing, besides the movement part, is that quietness of the entire experience on the lift ride up, the rattle of the chair at the towers and the almost silent hum vibrating through the cables on the way up, the cold winter air and the scenery, watching others ski on the way up, but most of all, the quiet of the mountain itself, the snow-covered trees, and the peacefulness that makes one feel one with nature in a weird way. 

 

I think I'm going to be ecstatic simply carving and being happy that I'm whole again and able to help my kids learn instead of watching them come down and giving them little nuanced advice based on what I see before they get back on the lift.  That in and of itself will be priceless. 

 

It'll be nice too to be doing something while people all around aren't texting.  LOL 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Fitness, Health, Nutrition, Injury, and Recovery › Has Anyone Skied Aggressively on a Total Knee-Replacement, a relatively modern one?