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Boots and Binding for backcountry, sidecountry

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I am totally beginner for Alpine Touring. Only have one day training on the mountain (with my normal alpine boots on a frame type AT binding with Soul 7 skis ).

 

I want to buy a boot, Scarpa Freedom SL, for lift-served skiing and touring in a single day.

 

Some questions about it:

 

1. Good for Marker Tour F10 Large Alpine Touring Ski Bindings 2016 ?

 

2. Good for Marker Kingpin 10 Alpine Touring Ski Bindings 2017 ?

 

3. if its OK to a normal day just inside a resort ?  Like all single or double black trails, total vertical around 23000 feet.  Compare the two sets above. I don’t want to loose downhill performance.

 

My level is strong level 8. Now ride Blizzard Bushwacker.

 

Appreciate for any suggestions !!!

post #2 of 8
It wouldn't be a bad option. But there are a tonne of boots in this category. You need to consider other variables such as last size and weight.

One thing to bear in mind is no AT/hybrid boot will give you the performance of a dedicated alpine boot.
post #3 of 8

So if you're doing lift served and touring in the same day, I am going to assume that your tours are going to be rather short. Your estimate of doing 23K vertical in a day really reinforces that you are going to be doing a lot more lift served skiing than touring. In that case, you may not want to give up the performance of a straight alpine boot. You can tour in an alpine boot without too much issue. It's not as comfortable, but for short tours, its probably your best bet. Heck, I have been doing quick and dirty touring for the last 3 seasons in a pair of Lange RS's, which are probably about as far from an AT boot as you can get short of a full-on plug boot. But they worked well enough for me. 

 

You state you don't want to give up downhill performance. Well, you absolutely will give up downhill performance in any AT setup. It's the nature of the beast. Alpine gear is optimized for downhill performance, and that's it. AT gear is designed to balance downhill performance with uphill practicality. When you compromise between two objectives, you will never get as good performance as the uncompromised equipment. 

post #4 of 8

This is very very personal, and I'm sure many people will disagree, especially as I heard, it's absolutely not cool to ski freeride skis with race boots :D But personally, if I go for lift served skiing, I take my race plug boots (170flex), as I just like much better how they feel compared to AT boots for skiing. Even if this might sound outrages, but while I was waiting for my new AT boots to arrive, and old ones were to big to fit into my new setup (small Duke bindings), I went ski touring (5h climb, all together 2000+ height meters of climbing...) with race boots. Sure it wasn't as pleasant or as fast as with AT boots, but I still had great day out there. But thing is, for ski touring (or whatever you call non-lift served backcountry) I would really suggest real AT boots, not alpine boots (I'm now on Dynafit TLT6 and I love them), as forces when skiing are nowhere near this what you are used on icy groomed courses, and walking in good AT boot just can't compare with "walking" in alpine boot.

As far as bindings goes, I really don't know. I have frame bindings on (Duke) and they are ok, on top of that they allow me to use my race boots when I go for lift served powder, and they feel better/safer then Dynafit stuff (I'm sure this is just in my head), but whenever I pick my wife's skis with Dynafit Radical bindings it makes me wonder, if I should just change my Duke for this super light stuff.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

This is very very personal, and I'm sure many people will disagree, especially as I heard, it's absolutely not cool to ski freeride skis with race boots :D 

Psh, whatevs. Around here you see tons of people on freeride skis and blue Langes. Yours truly included, until the end of this year. Just switched from an RS to an RX.

post #6 of 8

Freeski919 I don't really care how it looks, but if I go just skiing, without need for skinning up, I always go with my plug race boots. It might not look cool for some, but for me it's more important how it skis then how it looks :D

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thx a lot !!!  I will rental the gears at first, to get more experiences.

post #8 of 8
Scraps freedom SL... Don't get me started.... At least a couple degrees of outward cant, quite stiff..l I know three people who 'ski' this boot... two we've had to strongly suggest them into a different boot because it was inpossible to align correctly, yet alone flex the ankle properly... Look, it's a decent boot, but there are very few people it's going to work very well for. Like any other catagory of boot, you don't buy a brand or model unless it fits, you can flex the ankle, and for the most part, get bugs in alignment worked out.
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