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Which North American glaciers can you hike/ski in summer?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

I'm looking to compile a list of North American glaciers you can access for some summer turns. When I say "access" I mean hike, not lift served like Whistler or Mount Hood. 

 

If anyone's got any ideas or knowledge on the subject it would be much appreciated. At the moment I have this short list:

 

1. Mount Shasta, CA

2. Tyndall Glacier in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

3. Lamb’s Slide on Long's Peak, CO

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 28

All of them?

post #3 of 28

by the time your finished  that list it's could be pretty long.

 

From my den Baker and Shuksan are the most prominent but there others  Have never actually counted how many you can see from this area but there are a lot  Most are accessable (with varying amount of work)  

 

i  would cut that list down to glaciers you can access within a certain amount of time and are not known for huge hazzards.  Baker's multiple glaciers are easily accessed and frequently skied but doing so without a bit of knowledge or a guide could be a big mistake .  

post #4 of 28

All of the North Cascades on both sides of the border, and the Coast Range has hike-to glacial skiing, and then there's Alaska.  How long are you willing to hike?

post #5 of 28

Rainier and Hood--of course. It would not all be lift served on Hood. It's a big mountain and a little ski area. 

The glaciers in the Palisades in the Sierra Nevada, some small ones in the Minarets, also the glaciers in the Tetons and Wind Rivers. 

Glacier NP, the Canadian Rockies--the list is long but getting shorter by the day:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_glaciers_in_the_United_States

of course it depends on whether you want up and down in a day, overnight, or multiday trip; how steep, how willing you are to deal with crevasses, whether you're looking for good skiing or just to say you did it, how many turns makes it worthwhile, etc, etc. Somewhere in that list will be one that meet your criteria, whatever they are. 

post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 

Sorry, I guess I should have said "the best" or most well known. If you had to list 10? I'm looking for glaciers you can get up and down in a day and aspects that aren't riddled with hazards or require mountaineering gear or tons of climbing skill. 

post #7 of 28

Any in Utah? Or at least within a few hours of Ogden?

post #8 of 28
CO 14'ers. Segbrown does a good deal of spring summer touring in CO...
post #9 of 28

Are you really just looking for glaciers? Or any snow to ski? Because some places will hold snow through much of the summer, but aren't glaciers. @Stev and @dookey67 do a lot of that kind of skiing year round (check out http://www.patchskiing.com). And @bounceswoosh, @NayBreak, @segbrown and some others often find a way to make turns through much of the year I think. (Or at least I seem to recall threads of that nature from last summer!) 

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 

Are you really just looking for glaciers? Or any snow to ski? Because some places will hold snow through much of the summer, but aren't glaciers. @Stev and @dookey67 do a lot of that kind of skiing year round (check out http://www.patchskiing.com). And @bounceswoosh, @NayBreak, @segbrown and some others often find a way to make turns through much of the year I think. (Or at least I seem to recall threads of that nature from last summer!) 

 

Also @skiNEwhere lives practically on St Mary's. Its name includes the word glacier, but it's no longer a glacier (instead a snowfield), which one might postulate, if one were so inclined, could be due to global warming.

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post
 

All of them?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbat11700 View Post
 

Any in Utah? Or at least within a few hours of Ogden?

 

There is (or was) one glacier in UT, but it's "now considered to be a rock glacier, since the remaining ice is now buried in the talus" which means it's not skiable.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timpanogos_Glacier

There are some snowfields (or patches) on Mt Timpanogos and in other places in the Wasatch and the Uintas that should be skiable into summer.

post #12 of 28

Not a ton of turns to be had, but St. Mary's in Colorado is skiable, and access is very easy off I-70. 

post #13 of 28
What's the turn requirement (or vert)? What months are we talking about? Big difference between early July and September.



Oh, and hiking with skis is overrated biggrin.gif
post #14 of 28

Here's one suggestion--http://amountainjourney.com/glacier-route-middle-teton-gtnp/

I believe this becomes a dry, crevassed glacier later in the summer--it was snow covered when I was there many years ago in July.

Probably the most accessible glacier skiing in Wyoming. The glaciers in the Wind Rivers would involve several days to approach, ski, and return.

post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

What's the turn requirement (or vert)? What months are we talking about? Big difference between early July and September.



Oh, and hiking with skis is overrated biggrin.gif

 

Could be anytime during the summer, and as far as turn requirements I'm not limited...if it's classified as a glacier I think it would count, regardless of the length. 

post #16 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

All of the North Cascades on both sides of the border, and the Coast Range has hike-to glacial skiing, and then there's Alaska.  How long are you willing to hike?

Ideally, these would be day trips, but an overnighter isn't out of the question. If someone were visiting for a week and could only ski 2-3, which would you recommend? 

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born2Schuss View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

All of the North Cascades on both sides of the border, and the Coast Range has hike-to glacial skiing, and then there's Alaska.  How long are you willing to hike?

Ideally, these would be day trips, but an overnighter isn't out of the question. If someone were visiting for a week and could only ski 2-3, which would you recommend? 


My expertise is not hiking up glaciers.  You just asked where they were.

post #18 of 28

I don't know if they are technically glaciers but you can ski all summer long off of Rollins Pass in Colorado. 

 

The early summer shuttle laps on Mount Evans are pretty cool, it's a 14er. 

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born2Schuss View Post

Could be anytime during the summer, and as far as turn requirements I'm not limited...if it's classified as a glacier I think it would count, regardless of the length. 

Does it have to be a glacier, or can it be a skiable patch of shrinking proportions as summer wears on?

post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Born2Schuss View Post

Could be anytime during the summer, and as far as turn requirements I'm not limited...if it's classified as a glacier I think it would count, regardless of the length. 

Does it have to be a glacier, or can it be a skiable patch of shrinking proportions as summer wears on?


Can do that at Logan Pass once the Going to the Sun Road is open at Glacier NP.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Born2Schuss View Post

Could be anytime during the summer, and as far as turn requirements I'm not limited...if it's classified as a glacier I think it would count, regardless of the length. 

Does it have to be a glacier, or can it be a skiable patch of shrinking proportions as summer wears on?

 

Is that Fourth of July bowl?

post #22 of 28

There are several places in the Tetons with snow year around.

As has been mentioned above, the Middle Teton Glacier is easily accessible, (just a long hike on a very popular trail).  Here is a sampling with month of year skied.  I also included some videos of most of the runs.

 

Middle Teton Glacier - August

 

Teepee Glacier (Grand Teton) - August and October

Dike Couloir (between the Grand and Disappointment Peak) - August and October  (video shot in August)

 

Cave Couloir (Middle Teton just above The Meadows) - September

 

The Skillet (Mt Moran) - June 

(no video, did this in the mid-90s

 

 

And in the Sawtooth Range in Idaho, there are no glaciers, but snowfields to be found in June, July and sometimes in August/September.

This video documents a July trip up in the Finger of Fate area.

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

Is that Fourth of July bowl?

Yes...on July 31st...

I'm still trying to figure out the glacier requirement since it is possible that 12 hop turns on a patch (or reddy ice) may be required in some years to keep a streak going, and I'd never heard the glacier rule.



^^^Hillington
post #24 of 28

When you decide to head up peak 10 this summer and want some company let me know.  If you don't mind being seen with a Rubi.

 

By the way, I've heard that CDOT is way ahead of the game getting the passes open.  The Aspen side of Indy is suppose to be clear pretty far up.  Mt. Evans will open on time.  And trail Ridge is clear a good part of the way up.  You might be able to fins some good spots to hit up.

post #25 of 28
^^^Rubi's are all good smile.gif

I think we need a group event up there this summer. Thanks for the pass info - I won't do it until the lifts stop turning at A-Basin, although maybe that is just one more mindset to alter...
post #26 of 28

Last year was the first time I skied at least once every month. Unfortunately I'm going to have to miss out on summer skiing this season. Next season: 4th of July bowl, dammit!

post #27 of 28
I just hit month 18. We must have glaciers. smile.gif
post #28 of 28

OP if you check out this site, you'll get an idea of the most popular places in the PNW for year round skiing. There are gorgeous photos in the trip reports, though not everyone posts photos.

http://www.turns-all-year.com/

 

Here's a primer on skiing Washington's volcanoes:

http://www.turns-all-year.com/

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