or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Carving with soft skis

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

So now I have TWO skis in my quiver!!!

My regular carver, Elan Ripsticks, and an older 1080 mugul.

 

I test drove the 1080s a few days this season. Although I hit as many bump runs as I could, skiing in the eastern PA area, I ended up skiing more groomers regardless. I noticed that my legs were way more sore the next day than they would be been if I were out with the Ripsticks. I also felt my upper leg muscles being really worked while carving the 1080s. Especially towards the end of the day.

 

This got me wondering. Is it then a better workout to carve on soft skis?

 

Of course, to test this theory, I tried the Ripstick on some of the same trails the next time I went skiing. I felt like I was much faster and carved effortlessly. Could've been the skis but perhaps it was the workout paying off as well...

post #2 of 12

It's not really a matter of the soft skis. It's just a matter that the 1080 mogul ski is exceptionally poorly suited for carving. You're pretty much fighting against the nature of the ski to get it to carve. That's a lot of work. 

post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

It's not really a matter of the soft skis. It's just a matter that the 1080 mogul ski is exceptionally poorly suited for carving. You're pretty much fighting against the nature of the ski to get it to carve. not carving at all. That's a lot of work. 

That's better. 

post #4 of 12

I don't believe it to be helpful in the long run (or at all) to equate inefficient equipment to a workout. The next step to that could be to ski with inefficient technique to get a workout. Also, one day is not going to provide any noticeable change to a person'r level of fitness.

 

What I do believe you are experiencing is that soft and less "responsive" skis will require more pronounced movements to produce the desired results. When transferring to a more responsive ski your muscle memory of pronounced movements from the soft skis will feel even more effective on the responsive ski.

post #5 of 12

one other possibility is that the binding setup is totally different. Too much or too little forward lean/ramp can cause you to not be stacked over your skeleton and thus cause you to work different muscles as well.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5ki8um View Post
 

So now I have TWO skis in my quiver!!!

My regular carver, Elan Ripsticks, and an older 1080 mugul.

 

I test drove the 1080s a few days this season. Although I hit as many bump runs as I could, skiing in the eastern PA area, I ended up skiing more groomers regardless. I noticed that my legs were way more sore the next day than they would be been if I were out with the Ripsticks. I also felt my upper leg muscles being really worked while carving the 1080s. Especially towards the end of the day.

 

Could it just be that you were trying to hit as many bump runs as one possibly could? More than you did when you were on the Elans? Because that would tire people out. 

post #7 of 12


FWIW, a soft ski will usually carve better if you move the bindings back a cm or two.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
 


FWIW, a soft ski will usually carve better if you move the bindings back a cm or two.


Got any analysis on why moving the bindings back makes that kind of difference?  I'm assuming the softness in question is torsional.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 4/30/16 at 4:11am
post #9 of 12

I have noticed that while skiing softer carving skis, that as they are so much easier to bend into a turn that I tend to make much tighter turns for the speed I'm going.  So, maybe you were making tighter turns.  Or, maybe you did more bump runs, or maybe the flex pattern is different, or maybe it was the spring snow, or maybe it was that you drank less water, or maybe your were making more effort to control your speed, or maybe it was something else.  Too hard to tell from one day, but hopefully with enough responses a pattern will emerge. 

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


Got any analysis on why moving the bindings back makes that kind of difference?  I'm assuming the softness in question is torsional.

 

When trying to carve you weight the front end, and with soft skis you tend to immediately overpower whatever little edge grip you have.  My guess is that moving the bindings back gives you more front edge and less pressure per inch, so they hold a little better.  At least that has been my experience as a big guy whose experimented a lot with movable bindings, but I have no science to back it up.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

I don't believe it to be helpful in the long run (or at all) to equate inefficient equipment to a workout. The next step to that could be to ski with inefficient technique to get a workout. Also, one day is not going to provide any noticeable change to a person'r level of fitness.

 

What I do believe you are experiencing is that soft and less "responsive" skis will require more pronounced movements to produce the desired results. When transferring to a more responsive ski your muscle memory of pronounced movements from the soft skis will feel even more effective on the responsive ski.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but even though I lack experience, I'd have to agree with Rich.  I bought a pair of GS cheaters.  Never owned, or been on a pair before.  I used them the last day I skied this season.  What I discovered was, they were quicker edge to edge and I immediately noticed the skis had tails, or I guess you could say they were a lot harder to bend than my all mountains.  I made 7 or 8 runs with them before putting them away at lunch time in favor of my all mountains.  I guess I was more used to having to work harder with my more forgiving, less responsive all mountain skis.  The race skis found an edge in the blink of an eye, and it's fair to say I wasn't prepared for that.  I was continuing to try to horse them around like my all mountains.  They weren't having any of that.  They beat on my door and promptly announced their presence by saying, "YOU SUCK!!!"  All sorts of technique flaws showed through.  I didn't get the effective responsiveness that Rich was eluding to, but what he says makes perfect sense though.  While using OLR with a cross-through transition, I ended up feeling blocked because I couldn't get the ski to bend, which made it difficult to shorten my inside leg.  I switched to a cross over transition using ILE, and I kept feeling like I was going to hook an edge with my inside ski, and it affected my balance to some degree.  Eventually, I started lifting my inside ski just to get it out of the way.  Later, I settled down a bit and tried being more patient.  I made a few decent turns, but couldn't achieve any real consistency.  I know I have a lot to work out when next season starts.  I curious if anyone else had a similar experience when switching from all mountains to race skis?  If so, what did you do to work out the bugs?  Or, if you care to weigh in on what I'm doing wrong based on my brief description, I'd certainly welcome any criticism.                

post #12 of 12
Yeah, check the tune.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching