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How has your favorite mountain's terrain changed since opening? Pics and trail maps please.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I ran across this article from NewSchoolers this morning that showed some historical trail maps for Loon Mountain, NH; Jackson Hole, WY; and Whistler-Blackcomb, BC. I thought it was an interesting concept, but very under developed with only showing three areas plus only using Trail Maps. Sometimes more than just trails are added; buildings, lifts, etc. Especially with as many historically conscious members as we have I thought it would be cool to have a thread that shows historical and current trail maps for different areas as well as some relevant images if you happen to have any. I don't have anything to contribute at the moment to start, but I hope someone out there might. 

post #2 of 17

On The Trail Map Runs.....Standard v Tree

Standard..... Goat

Tree.............Paradise..

 

I cant debate all the runs not on the map............

post #3 of 17

Lots of changes since Sugarbowl originally opened in 1930s.

 

Here's their history page.http://www.sugarbowl.com/history

There are pictures on the page.

 

Looking for some old maps but here's some of what I remember over the past 16 years.

 

When I learned to ski there in the 60's There was not a Judah side to the mountain. It was Christmas tree, Lincoln, Crows nest, Disney and Knob hill. No direct access to the mountain. You had to either hike in, or take the Gondola.

Disney was a double fixed grip, Knob hill was a rope tow, Lincoln was a double fixed grip and started at the Village lodge and went all the way to the top of Lincoln Peak. Christmas tree was also a double fixed grip, as was Crows nest.

 

When I started teaching there 16 years ago, most of the activities were still out of the Village side of the resort. The Judah Lodge was partly a big white tent. Jerome hill and Judah were almost brand new. 

post #4 of 17

 

I knew I saw a website with old maps on it.

 

Found the Sugarbowl page..

post #5 of 17
Since I first skied at Mt.Washington Vancouver Island, They have added a whole area, the Outback, which is good; the new lifts make accessing that area much more rewarding for the effort. However, I strongly SUSPECT that skiing the most exciting adrenalin pumping lines, beyond the cliff ropes is now much harder to access without incurring ski area management wrath and legal obsticals, which is sad
post #6 of 17
Skimaps.org had some of Whitefish, but there are older maps that don't bear ANY resemblance to the current ski area, which I have dug up.

1955:


Some time later:



1977:

1316284463.jpg

Current equivalent:
wmr_trailmap_frontside_1516.jpg

The above trail map does not include the two other areas now open, Hellroaring Basin and the North Side.
Edited by sibhusky - 4/27/16 at 11:21am
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post
 

 

I knew I saw a website with old maps on it.

 

Found the Sugarbowl page..

Hah!!  Magic Carpet chair lift!  Granted there were a few years when I didn't hit SB at all, but I've never seen it running.  Presumably it was meant as an emergency back up for the gondola; now there's a mechanical piece of history  for you!

post #8 of 17

Actually when they first installed the magic carpet chair through 1993 ish, it ran almost every time I was there. Before the Judah side of the mountain, everyone had to access the mountain via the gondola so if you didn't mind being in the open air, it was always an option. They allowed you to ride holding your skis instead of putting them on and there were places to "run off" the chair instead of skiing off.

 

DC

post #9 of 17

Mount Baker started as just a rope tow and a lot of hike-to terrain.  On this 1977 map It's a little hard to see, but the dark lines are the lifts, all doubles.  Notice the parallel Shuksan Arm Chairs. 

 

The newest maps show the addition of chairs 7 and 8 and the replacement of the old parallel chairs 4 and 5 with the new fixed grip quad now called C5.  Every chair has been turned into a fixed grip quad over the past years and two new day lodges, White Salmon, and Raven Hut have been added.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post
 

Actually when they first installed the magic carpet chair through 1993 ish, it ran almost every time I was there. Before the Judah side of the mountain, everyone had to access the mountain via the gondola so if you didn't mind being in the open air, it was always an option. They allowed you to ride holding your skis instead of putting them on and there were places to "run off" the chair instead of skiing off.

 

DC

 

makes sense - I started hitting SB in the late 90s.  Any bets on if/when they pull the old Crows Nest chair?

post #11 of 17

I snapped a picture of the original Massanutten trail map from the 1970s when it was hanging in the lodge before the recent renovation.  The original trail names were . . . well . . . southern.  A few were changed when the major upgrades started around 2005.  Massanutten is a major timeshare resort, with a lot of owners from the DC metro area.  Showtime (blue) and MakAttack (black, blue) used to be Rebel Yell and Dixie Dare.  Pretty sure that Whim Wham became the tubing park.  Lift 6 to the summit was added in the 1990s I think.  I was impressed that Massanutten commissioned James Niehues to do a painting for the trail map as part of the upgrade process.

 

 

post #12 of 17

Well, ok, I'll play.  Sunapee in 1968:

 

Created by AccuSoft Corp.


And in 2014:

 

 

Terrain expansion coming over the next few years.

 

Edit — not my favorite resort, but that's where my pass is.

post #13 of 17

Snowbasin just celebrated its 75th anniversary this year.  Anybody interested in its history should browse their blog which has a great multi-part history of the resort through the years (e.g. https://www.snowbasin.com/blog/75th-anniversary-history-blog-series-the-1970s).   It is written by Kyle Ross, a local skier who apparently started skiing at Snowbasin about the same time I did. 

 

Since I have only been skiing there since the mid 70s, I picked this depiction of how the mountain looked when I started with the red lines depicting the lifts at that time (minus the Middle Bowl chair that was installed for the 1979-80 season and the old Littlecat chair which was constructed the summer of 1976 to replace the original T Bar which drove many beginners from embracing the sport) and the light blue lines depicting the current lifts:

 

 

This is the first trail map I remember of the area:

post #14 of 17
Flier circa summer 1999.


post #15 of 17

I looked but haven't found any old trail maps to match without too much other stuff attached .

 

When we started skiing Whistler there was: 

the 4 passenger gondola up from the Creekside Barn adjacent McConkey's to mid station . The line up usually started out in the muddy parking lot 

Then Red a painfully slow 2 passenger up to Roundhouse.

The alternative route which seemed faster was the 2 passenger Orange up Goats Gully to top of where the Garbonzo chair ends now then skiing down to the 2 seat Green same location as today's Emerald 

the 2 t bars are exactly the same, and were the only access to Harmony

The much missed Blue was the way back. It ran from bottom of Harmony up Chunky's to the Roundhouse flats.

Those Blue lineups were even worse than Harmony today.

Whistler Bowl required a traverse from top of t-bars, tucking the Saddle then a sight uphill hike to crest the low point. Usually once a day, last run 

The "Olympic Run" ran from bottom of Green down to the garbage dump (where Whistler Village is today) then a bus shuttle back to Creekside

no lifts on that side.

 

On a good day we thought we were lucky to make the Roundhouse by 10:30 if we left home after 5

The drive sucked. Pavement ended once past Daisy Lake and you often needed to race to a few one lane bridges first or be stuck waiting for the traffic coming the other way to pass.   

 

Now you easily ski Whistler,West Bagel Harmony Little Whistler Sunbowl Boomer Flute and Symphony Bowls from high speed quads

Not to mention everything on Blackcomb  a comfortable 12 minute ride away

post #16 of 17

Okay, so my home mountain, Stowe, has a rather sizeable pile of history behind it, dating back to 1933 and the Civilian Conservation Corps cutting the first trails on Mt Mansfield, The Bruce and The Nose Dive. The first lift started running in 1940, a single chair that was the longest chairlift in the world at the time. There aren't really maps dating back that far, so the first map I can find is from 1952:

 

 

Then 1963, Pretty much all the main Quad trails and the Spruce trails are in place, but no Gondola yet. 

 

 

Then by 1970 the original Gondola is in, and the only major lift/trail not in place on the mountain is Lookout. 

 

 

By 1980, all of the major trails/lifts are in place. 

 

 

Through the 80's and 90's, some lifts were upgraded, like the Fourrunner Quad replacing the single and double chairs, a new 8 person Gondola replacing the old 4 person one. But essentially between 1980 and 2000, the mountain was pretty static in its offerings. 1994 below:

 

 

Starting in 2000 up to now, Stowe has done serious upgrades to its Spruce Peak area, completely redoing the base area, as well as replacing every lift on the Spruce side. The Big Spruce and Little Spruce doubles were replaced by the Sensation and Sunny Spruce HSQ's respectively, the Easy Street and Alpine doubles were replaced by the Meadows Quad, a couple Magic Carpets along with the Adventure Triple and Inspiration trail were added for more learning terrain. The old Day Lodge and Adventure Center have been replaced by the Stowe Mountain Lodge hotel, Spruce Camp, a giant new Adventure center, and a whole plaza with shops and ice skating and all sorts of wildly luxurious amenities. 

 

The 2015 map below. As of 2016-17, the construction at Spruce Base will be finished, and the new Plaza will be fully operational. I expect we'll be attacking Alderaan sometime in mid-December. 

 

post #17 of 17

Good thread, wish I had some of my memorabilia that has been tossed the past 20 years to show some of this stuff.

 

 A number of areas around the country had their original lifts placed in a rather helter skelter manor. Schweitzer is a great example of this. Many of their expansions were based on where friends and family thought they wanted to ski, when they had the monies a chair went over there, That was a very disjointed area for a long time. Some of the areas that evolved from old ski club hills were really bad about this.

 

Alyeska went a different way, they only had one double chair, a crapped out poma-lift at the slalom hill, a couple of rope tows at the bottom, and a mighty-mite up top. The weekends could have brutal lines in the rain at the bottom. That configuration offered access to most of the terrain being skied today (North Face was even skied on vary rare occasions). Their first attempt to expand on that was "chair 2", an avalanche took it out the 1st season it was open. After that debacle the Forest Service took a very close look at anything they wanted to do for a very long time.

 

The taming of some of the terrain is a tale of its own; Alyeskas'  only intermediate way down at the time took skiers across a pitch called "Waterfall" that is what it was in the summers. Management dynamited and bulldozed most of the summer of 70? to push the top to the lower area of it and in the end made an actual blue run out of one side of it. That alteration changed the mountains personality as much as any lift that has since been installed there.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How has your favorite mountain's terrain changed since opening? Pics and trail maps please.