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Which eastern ski race academy?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
There are now so many to pick from. Please post your reviews and opinions of eastern ski race academies, There are a lack of real reviews on the web.

Which ones currently have great coaches.
Which ones do you think can take skiers to next level.
Which ones tend to give financial aid, this is important.
Which ones are more affordable (yeah if thats possible) and the most expensive.
Did your child attend fulltime boarding or day, or just winter term? How did they like it and did they improve?
Did your academy travel to practice at different mountains or staid at the home mountain majority of time?
How many camps did your kid attend and what age groups did they race in?
Did your academy find opportunities for high level racers?
Did your academy pay attention to bottom level racers?
How was the education? Compared to public school.
Was your academy more ski focused or education focused or both?
Which ones tend to be better for girl or boy or both?
How was the vibe of the academy and the other kids?
Rank your top choices.

We all know the top names like burke but what about Waterville valley, i heard they are doing great things? It looks like SMS has i really nice facility and a lot of great skiers. Sometimes what you hear is the best is not always the best, i would like to know the truth.

Burke, SMS, KMS, OKE, MMSC, GMVS, MSA, WVBBTS, Proctor, Holderness, Gould, CVA, NYSEF, NSA, NWA.





.
post #2 of 23

Welcome to EpicSki!  You might take a look at this thread from 2015.  The OP was asking about a different region but you may gain some insight from the discussion.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/133536/high-school-ski-team-academy

post #3 of 23
Holderness is not a ski Academy but a boarding school that has skiing. Far better education than a ski academy less high level ski training.

Tom Barbeau of Waterville is very good but I don't know much about that program.

Sorry, but I don't have much info for you.
post #4 of 23

This is a tough call.  As a coach at a small Mountain, I have been to several of these academies but have not coached or trained there.  I have met many of their coaches and I am uniformly impressed.  Once there aside from (many) race opps, you mainly train there. Some quick thoughts.

 

Burke is pretty awesome.  Old school T bar with HUGE training hill and superb training terrain. Longest T bar I have ever seen.  Leg burner!  "If you can ski well there, you can ski well anywhere in the world" is a motto of the coaches who are very good indeed.  Amenities are a bit thin.  Old school.  Close to Jay Peak too.   That said, the ownership currently has some $$ explaining to do.  

 

KMS is well...Killington.  Lots of stuff to do.  Not in the middle of nowhere.  Great lodge.  Party time vibe.  SICK terrain.  Headmaster is a pretty cool cat!  Very good athletes.  Solid program.

 

Took my Level 200 on snow at Waterville.  Nice looking facility.  Good race facilities.  Good race culture.  Old school.  Good coaching.  Neat small village IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE.  Younger kids would prob love. 

 

SMS is again.... well Stratton.   Pass the Brie and caviar.  $$$$.  Great snow.  Interesting terrain. Dick head New Yorkers. But I have seen more than one SM kid transition to Burke.  EASY to get to.   

 

Gould is in Timbucktoo.  

 

Hiolderness is a good.  Winnipesaukee vibe.  Decent academics.  $$$$.

 

That is my .02

 

Two questions that stuck out are "academics" and  "next level"...  

 

1.  Sigh....as for academics....something has to give.  Never mind that fact that the "best" racers are inherently ADD adrenaline junkies with more guts than brains, but if you are shelling out 40++K per year to live on a Mt, book larnin ain't gonna be #1.  (I am a HS English teacher in real life)  That said, the status of public education IMO is abysmal; catering to the lowest achievers and severely handicapping anyone with half a brain - never mind surrounding students with any potential whatsoever with apathetic morons in the name of "parity" and "diversity."  So....compared to "public school"....but I digress.  

 

2.  Re "Next Level"

 

What do you mean?  College? D 1-2-3?   FIS? USST?  World cup?

 

To be honest we are ALL one twisted knee or concussion away from the bunny slope.  What are you willing to invest for the shortest and cruelest of all careers?

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Holderness is not a ski Academy but a boarding school that has skiing. Far better education than a ski academy less high level ski training.
 

 

Dav went to Holderness and his oldest is there now.

post #6 of 23

This thread is going to bounce all over the place. You're going to get a lot of opinions, a lot of hearsay, a lot of stale information. and some good information. A lot of frankly uninformed information, though. I already disagree with some of the "opinions" 16 hours into this. But I'm not going to argue them here. 

 

Are you looking for this coming year? Or just getting some thoughts together?

 

Our kids attended four of the ski academies and prep schools mentioned on the list, my wife and I attended two others. We have kids who started at one, and moved to another. Our kids all did PG years, with other programs. I have served on three boards, my wife on two. I have been hired as a consultant by two of the other schools on the list. Our son is a coach in a very intense program out West these days, and I get his insight, as well, about how U14-U19 racers develop in other parts of the country. And there is no lack of opinion. None. He's in conversations with at least six families about "what they should do", and the right path very much depends on the kid. And not just on the kid's skiing. 

 

I think it ALL depends on the kid, the peers who will be there at the same time, the ENTIRE staff, and of course the coaches. Much is fluid. You can have one age group that has a tremendous experience, followed by one a year younger that has totally different dynamics, and has a poor one. Depends on the entire community, and is very much all about the right fit. All of these programs assign kids to "contact" or "training" groups differently. It can be great, or a disaster. 

 

There is often coach and program director change at these places. It's very fluid as well. Some at more places than others. In fact there are changes underway at about half of the schools/programs that have been referenced here. Some not that public yet. And assuming that more people move from their current spots to fill some vacancies, there will be more. Its actually a VERY unusual year in that respect. 

 

Our kids both graduated from ski academies, captained NCAA teams, and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from very demanding schools.  They're also good people. It worked. But they were driven from the minute they stepped into the ski academy world as students and athletes. They knew they wanted to race at as high a level as possible, and they also knew that they would have more college options with good school performance. They had college coaches telling them that when they were 14. They had similar peers. And they also had classmates who were not so dialed into school. No question they gained a lot from the experience, and gave up a lot. They would do it again, and appreciate the experience. 

 

OP, PM if you'd like. I'm NOT getting into this debate on here. I hope you can understand that. 

 

The Davenports decision to enroll Stian at Holderness was surely not based on skiing, as I understand it. A lot of factors, including giving him a traditional education back East {like Chris had}, and probably having him experience more than growing up in Aspen. Aspen, BTW, depending on what survey you check, has the number one rated pubic school system in the country. The Davenport family are longtime big supporters of independent school education. I count over a dozen friends who have served on the board at Holderness. The comment that the education is "far better" is very debatable, IMO.  Anybody associated with GMVS{I'm NOT}, for example, would energetically dispute it, and if you look at recent college acceptances GMVS would make a strong case. In terms of breadth of the experience, yes a traditional prep school offers a lot more. Holderness has a number of kids coming next year from a few ski academies, and they are losing a few to others. The same happens every year at Gould, and Proctor. About fit. 

 

It's not that black and white. There is not what is the best, IMO. We have one with a LD, and for him, his best ski option was not the best school option. Another academy had a great group coming in his grade, would've been great peers. We were not entirely sure of how they could best help him with his LD though, so we made another choice, among two-three schools. We did our best, guessed, crossed our fingers, and it worked. He made it work. 

 

Some kids do fall and winter term transitions really well, as do their schools at "home."  Others do not. In our experience, the fall transition is pretty easy, the spring one, not as much. For a lot of reasons. Here's a simple one. Ski academies then to go on vacation for two weeks in April after the season ends. The kids are fried {as is the staff}. It's brutal if instead of vacation to sleep, you head right back into school. Parents underestimate that going home, and jumping right into lacrosse might not be that easy. At all. Many kids do the winter term thing ONCE, then do full term in the following years. Many others have no problem managing it, at all. Depends on the kid. They get ahead in some classes, and behind in others. We never did winter terms. Many friends did. 

 

And yes, this endeavor can cost a small fortune. If financial aid is critical, it re-stacks the entire deck. I know a straight A student, 8th grader, good {not exceptional yet...late birthday} skier, who's family expected to be awarded financial aid everywhere he applied this year, based on need. He received about $10K a year {off a $50K price tag} at one of the seven schools. Nothing elsewhere. And they can't really afford this. Not fun. 

 

The additional costs add up. You need a handle on all of that, as well. Camps, trips, entry fees, equipment {including set up, grinds, etc}, wax {often they will bill you for race wax}, and on and on. If you're on snow full time, you go through everything in more numbers. Break more goggle lens, need gloves sooner, wreck suits faster, etc.. Our kids travelled a lot to train, and race. They went through a lot of skis. And yes we passed up free slow skis to buy fast good ones. So yeah.....it's not that hard to spend almost as much in the other stuff as you pay for school. The older they are, the better they are, the more it costs. One summer one of ours was at Hood, in New Zealand for a month, then in Chile until after Labor Day. Three weeks later in Austria, them to Colorado, then to British Columbia for the early NorAms. That was at 18, not at 14. 

 

It's very hard to jump off the train once you're on it, too. Very hard to tell a child that it doesn't make sense for your family to keep doing this.  

 

Of course, you could also take the route that more than a few families are......having mom and kids move West for the winter, enrolling in a good public school option, and joining one of the bigger programs. If you have two or more kids, it's less expensive than a full time academy in the East. People are doing this at Aspen, Steamboat, Vail.....and in Utah, Tahoe. When people who live in ski towns out West hear of what the cost is for an Eastern Academy, they are astounded. 

Vail's setup with VSSA, the first public ski academy in the country and SSCV is pretty unique. Kids are on snow, full time, 5th grade on. It's VERY reasonable. Renting in the area is a bigger challenge. 

 

But then again, you have families who live is all of these mountain towns who also choose to send their kids East to the Eastern academies. It's all over the place. 

 

Then of course you could hire a private coach, and go down that road. That runs about $150K a kid, per year, and some families are spending almost twice that. I think it's NUTS. The problem is that it works. It you want the fastest ski racers, it sadly works. And there is no lack of Type A families with very, very deep pockets.

 

As I said, PM me if you'd like. 


Edited by Muleski - 4/25/16 at 4:52pm
post #7 of 23
^^ great post! That pretty much lays it out. I will withdraw the "far better" comment as too sweeping.

Where did all the Marshall kids go to school?
post #8 of 23

The Marshall kids all went to GMVS.  Might not be a great fit there today, as they are quite a bit more academically demanding. You have kids graduating from GMVS headed to all of the Ivies, MIT, Stanford, Caltech, all of the NESCAC schools. Not all to continue to ski. They have kind of carved out that niche. 

 

Four Marshall kids. The youngest is Tucker, who's 26? and still racing full time. No college. Cody went into the USST system, and was doing really well before his fall and head injury. Chelsea was a long time USST skier. Jesse, the oldest, worked his ass off as a skier, and onto the USST at about 20. Great skiers. I don't think any have gone on to college. Which in my book is no big deal, BUT today GMVS is very much a college prep "ski academy". All of the top racers will take PG years, and they are placing kids in the USST system, but the goal pretty much is to end up in college at some time. 

 

Marshall's are from Pittsfield, VT . Logged a while lotta time at K as kids. Mom was a long time instructor. Nice family. 

post #9 of 23

I'm bookmarking this thread. My niece is heading to GMVS as a freshman this year. This entire thing is brand new for our family. Luckily we have a cousin who lives in Warren, with his family, so that will be helpful, or comfortable, or something. 

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

The Marshall kids all went to GMVS.  Might not be a great fit there today, as they are quite a bit more academically demanding. You have kids graduating from GMVS headed to all of the Ivies, MIT, Stanford, Caltech, all of the NESCAC schools. Not all to continue to ski. They have kind of carved out that niche. 

Four Marshall kids. The youngest is Tucker, who's 26? and still racing full time. No college. Cody went into the USST system, and was doing really well before his fall and head injury. Chelsea was a long time USST skier. Jesse, the oldest, worked his ass off as a skier, and onto the USST at about 20. Great skiers. I don't think any have gone on to college. Which in my book is no big deal, BUT today GMVS is very much a college prep "ski academy". All of the top racers will take PG years, and they are placing kids in the USST system, but the goal pretty much is to end up in college at some time. 

Marshall's are from Pittsfield, VT . Logged a while lotta time at K as kids. Mom was a long time instructor. Nice family. 
Interesting about GMVS. Big change from 10 yrs ago.

Barabara Marshall is a classic Vermonter. I had a clinic with her in 2003 at Stowe. She's famous for her Michelin Man look. I'd heard that Patagonia had questioned her clothing order stating that pro deals were for personal use only. She had ordered 3 different sizes of down jackets. Well she replies they were for her personal use. It's true too, she wore them in ascending sizes, thus the Michelin effect. Even in April on Superstar at Killington you'd see her there with a puffy down jacket.

At lunch we ran into her daughter Chelsea at the ski rack, a young kid. In 2010 she would be in the Olympics at Vancouver. Super g or downhill. Dnf'd, but impressive to be there. I saw the '03 Nationals at White Face. Jesse was 3rd behind Schlopy and Bode in Slalom.
I remember Barbara saying that Jesse wasn't any good till about 14 or 15 years old. At that time she thought a junior program we discussed skied way too many gates. Programs have changed a lot since then.
post #11 of 23
I should add that ALL of them are more rigorous from an academic standpoint than they were 15-20 years ago. But even then, if the kid had academic drive, to match their athletic drive, they did just fine. Look at what some of the alums have gone on to do from any and all of these schools, and it's impressive.
What I think is now the norm are far fewer who are essentially "OP" {on their own program} and doing really minimal academic work. I just don't see it.
If anything, I see these schools packing an awful lot into very full days.
Probably the biggest lesson learned by our kids was how to manage their time, including their down time.
I'm sure it's more of a challenge now than ever.
But yes, all of these schools have kids moving on to do neat things. And all no doubt have slackers.....like most schools. Just used GMVS as one example.
post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thank you, you have a lot of great insight, and your children did very well. 

 

When starting this tread i figured i would get some off the wall opinions and some worthwhile information.

 

Talking to other race parents and coaches is always best, but when searching online for reviews and experiences its pretty limited. 

 

Yes i am looking to send my child to an academy this fall full time, and yes i cannot afford it this time, so i'm considering winter term also. My child is applying to 5 schools, i'm waiting to see if any of them will offer financial aid. I am applying to NY, VT, and NH. I will update this post if am offered anything so others like me know what to expect if they are in need of aid. 

 

This is my child's dream not mine, she wants to make it as far as she can in this sport, and she wants to go to a ski focused school. I do believe no matter what is said going to an academy will be a great experience and investment for my child. The kids attending academies are well rounded they have goals, ambitions, and work hard (that's if they are passionate about being there).

 

I like the options mentioned about moving to a ski town and enrolling in a program like in CO and UT. But i work from home and have to stay on the east coast in case i need to travel to the office. Are there any programs like this on the east coast? that are academy like, i know there are weekend programs but they only train Friday to Sunday and most of those days are race days. I have considered moving to a choice school district in VT, they offer about 15k a year towards school if you are a home owner.  Our first choice is still attending a school but if its not possible i am wondering what are some good backup options. 

 

Thank you

post #13 of 23
Muleski's post is dead on accurate, so I won't add much.

Most, if not all, of the Eastern academies have really increased the academics to the point that the best students can get into any type of college they want.

However, your kid better be mature enough to handle the training stress, the travel stress, and the academic stress at the same time. They have to want to do it for themselves, not mom and dad. The ones who do can write their own ticket to any college they desire. They are so far ahead of the typical high school student in time management, it is almost not fair.

Massive improvement in skiing/racing is a given from the amount of snow time and level of coaching.

Expect to shell out serious $$$$. You will not only be paying for the private HS education, but extra for camps, races, world traveling, worn out/outdated equipment, etc.

However, if your kid has what it takes to be at an academy, and really loves snowsports, it is a once in a lifetime opportunity. That makes the experience priceless.

As Muleski's said, a lot of "musical chairs" going on this year. The one that is publically known is Mike Savage from CVA is taking over the Alpine Program at Waterville to be closer to his family. The rest I don't want to comment on until it is publically released. Needless to say, these academies always attract the top coaches, so when one leaves, another one is attracted to the open position.
Edited by CaptainKirk - 4/26/16 at 11:33am
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainKirk View Post

However, your kid better be mature enough to handle the training stress, the travel stress, and the academic stress at the same time. They have to want to do it for themselves, not mom and dad. The ones who do can write their own ticket to any college they desire. They are so far ahead of the typical high school student in time management, it is almost not fair.

 

 

 

Don't underestimate this statement. It hard for kids in there early to mid teens to be away from home. Kids have be both self motivated enough to want to perform academically and physically and mature enough to be able to handle it without having a total meltdown. They will also be given a good amount of independence and freedom and need to be handle that too because there will be ample opportunities to exercise judgement whether doing X is a good idea or not.


Edited by ZeroGravity - 4/27/16 at 6:00am
post #15 of 23

This is an unusual year for movement at the Head of School, Executive Director. Program Director and Head Coach level. Yes Mike's leaving CVA and headed to BBTS, and a big driver was that his wife has a great job in Plymouth, NH {which can't ne duplicated in Kingfield, ME} and Mike misses seeing her and his son in a normal family setting. That's no doubt the biggest part of the decision. I hear it was a tough one. Mike's put a lot of energy into CVA {he's an alum}. CVA has other turnover going on {people moving into very big jobs}, as do seven of the other eastern programs on that list, that I know of. I think in a couple of weeks it could be nine. Turnover at high levels. Which leads to a lot of interested applicants, some of whom are in similar roles at other schools. Musical chairs. Unusual year. 

 

You cannot make these school choices based strictly on who is on staff. It's fluid. There are a lot of big jobs open in the West, and more to be announced. They are going to draw interest from Eastern candidates. Already are. If those people leave, then the Eastern programs need to hire, and this gets real complicated. And the best are very choosey about who they will hire. My experience is that there are always good coaches at these places. These tend to be very good coaching jobs. 

 

There is a lot more to this than most realize, and the choices are not always that easy or clear. The we went through this, we knew people working, attending or having graduated at EVERY Eastern academy. We knew people on the board at all of them. We knew parents. Some of these people we had known for 30+ years. We visited every academy. Our kids were talented skiers. We were not going to qualify for any aid; we were full-pays. We visited every one in the fall, and then cut down the list and visited four in the winter, and went back to visit two. They we hoped that we had made the right decision. 

 

Even with all of that to "work with" it was a very, very agonizing decision. Our first decision was the wrong one, for reasons that we had not foreseen. The second time we got it right, or right enough. We have people to this day telling us that we should have done it differently. They would have been even better skiers. Really? Are you serious? Our kids would not change a thing. They and we realize full well that NONE of these places are perfect. Heck no prep school is perfect. They all have their quirks and warts. You navigate around them. 

 

At this point, things like FIS point profiles, NCAA qualifiers, US Nationals, etc. are very removed from the experience. Kids made great friends, grew up a lot, we enjoyed the community, and it all worked out. Our kids closest friends are their classmates. 

 

The time management thing is huge. Even at 27, and 30 it is HUGE. They get more out of a week that one could ever imagine. College was a breeze, and fun. Zero stress for them, and they were at schools were there was plenty. If anything they were coaching friends on how to minimize the stress. They are no angels, are are not perfect. As I have said they missed zero parties. But I also know that they both tended to get up early, maybe go for a run, eat a decent breakfast, and start the day often 4-5 hours before friends were out of bed. They knew how to talk to professors. They knew how to plan, work hard and execute. They could deal with ups and downs. 

 

Good points in the posts above. This is not for everybody.....at all. For the right kid, it can be tremendous experience. 

 

Not all of these places are CLOSE to being the same, and it's all about fit. I cannot say that enough. It's not about the resume of coaches, and who else they claim to have coached. It's not about the beauty of the campus. It's not about where the summer camps are. Or about the extra class options. It's about the entire thing, and what feels right to the parents nd the kids. The kids MUST feel comfortable there. And the parents need to feel good about it. 

 

The one thing that I think I should re-emphasize is that it's very, very hard to do this without spending more money than seems reasonable. I would have friends comment that the schools were expensive. Yep. "But, of course that includes all of the ski stuff, right?" Nope. One off season, we spent over $30K, per kid, in camps and travel. The better and older they get, the more it costs. It "is what it is."

 

But that puts a lot of pressure on a family. It's really tough on some kids. We had to hammer our kids to not act like they were entitled. But our kids had a lot of great "stuff", and I think it was clear that while we were not spending like idiots, there was no budget. And that's the case for many/most. If you're scraping it together, it's just a bit harder. You need to perhaps go about it differently. This is also not fair but true. The good kid, who works hard, and has a LOT of ski talent has a much better shot of getting a lot of financial help that the kid who does not have the same ski potential. There is only so much to go around. It's not fair. 

 

Our colleges, and those of our kids are loaded with resources. High endowments. As a result, we give pretty small donations. On the flip side, our kids ski academies need every dime they can get, and they stretch it and use it wisely. So we try to help there. We've seen a lot of kids who literally have had life changing experiences. 

 

Sorry to ramble. 


Edited by Muleski - 4/26/16 at 8:45pm
post #16 of 23
Muleski, that last post is perfect! Sums everything up. I too donate more money to ski academies / race clubs than my university. The university has billions in endowment. I have seen ski academies stretch their limited budgets to help keep great kids of modest means there, and that has positively changed their lives forever.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post

 

The time management thing is huge. Even at 27, and 30 it is HUGE. They get more out of a week that one could ever imagine. College was a breeze, and fun. Zero stress for them, and they were at schools were there was plenty. If anything they were coaching friends on how to minimize the stress. They are no angels, are are not perfect. As I have said they missed zero parties. But I also know that they both tended to get up early, maybe go for a run, eat a decent breakfast, and start the day often 4-5 hours before friends were out of bed. They knew how to talk to professors. They knew how to plan, work hard and execute. They could deal with ups and downs. 

 

Good points in the posts above. This is not for everybody.....at all. For the right kid, it can be tremendous experience. 

 

 

More sage words here. While being at an academy may not have ended up being the "best" experience for my guy, being largely autonomous for those 3 years has left him well adjusted for life at college. Time management, priorities, eating, organization, doing laundry and yes, knowing when you can get away with letting loose and when you can't is an important life skill.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by raceparent View Post
 

Thank you, you have a lot of great insight, and your children did very well. 

 

When starting this tread i figured i would get some off the wall opinions and some worthwhile information.

 

Talking to other race parents and coaches is always best, but when searching online for reviews and experiences its pretty limited. 

 

Yes i am looking to send my child to an academy this fall full time, and yes i cannot afford it this time, so i'm considering winter term also. My child is applying to 5 schools, i'm waiting to see if any of them will offer financial aid. I am applying to NY, VT, and NH. I will update this post if am offered anything so others like me know what to expect if they are in need of aid. 

 

This is my child's dream not mine, she wants to make it as far as she can in this sport, and she wants to go to a ski focused school. I do believe no matter what is said going to an academy will be a great experience and investment for my child. The kids attending academies are well rounded they have goals, ambitions, and work hard (that's if they are passionate about being there).

 

I like the options mentioned about moving to a ski town and enrolling in a program like in CO and UT. But i work from home and have to stay on the east coast in case i need to travel to the office. Are there any programs like this on the east coast? that are academy like, i know there are weekend programs but they only train Friday to Sunday and most of those days are race days. I have considered moving to a choice school district in VT, they offer about 15k a year towards school if you are a home owner.  Our first choice is still attending a school but if its not possible i am wondering what are some good backup options. 

 

Thank you


Look at Franconia Ski Club.  It's lhome base is Cannon Mountain, in NH.

This is a class act organization.

Bode Miller went through its program.

post #19 of 23
FSC is a good program. I don't know how much Bode was really a part of it. He was pretty much a free spirit in his youth, and often just did his own thing at Cannon. It wasn't until he moved on to CVA that he became "coachable". More like the staff at CVA was smart enough to stop trying to change him, and Bode grew smart enough to allow them to coach him. But even at CVA he was a still a free spirit.
post #20 of 23

You might want to have a look at Holderness's Alumni Magazine from Winter 2016. It has a section on the ski racing program, mostly history. There's a piece by Davenport and a couple others. I think it applies in general to someone going to a race program. Pretty much what @Muleski was talking about in what kids can get out of it.

 

Things have certainly changed for the better. I worked with someone who was Headmaster at SMS in the 90's. Some of the parents were absolutely the problem. But very, very different today from what Muleski describes.

 

https://www.holderness.org/holderness-school-today

direct link to mag:

https://issuu.com/holdernessschool/docs/winter_2016_hst_web/1?e=4061555/33794577

post #21 of 23

Every child is different and you should look at all of the programs to see which is the best fit for your child. There are true ski academies and there are prep schools with very strong alpine programs. Some of the academies are full year, with winter sessions and some are just winter. Just because a program is great for 1 kid, does not mean it will be a great program for your kid. Determine what criteria is important to you and find a program that meets that criteria. Look at the academics offered. The schedule, some programs don't offer any training on the weekends. What is available if they don't have a race? What is the dorm situation? What are the college placements? How many go on to ski at the NCAA level or choose USCSA (several levels in this league)?

 

All of the questions asked in the first post, are what to use to determine your criteria.

post #22 of 23
Hello, everyone. I'm the program director and head coach at Northwood School in Lake Placid. In two seasons, with a renewed commitment to excellence in athletics and in our demanding academic programs we'be managed to produce two U16 Eastern Champions (women's SL and men's GS), win devo race and U18 FIS Finals SL. This was not by accident. There are good things happening at Whiteface and with our partners at NYSEF. Really fun vibe here and Lake Placid is a wonderful little town to come to.
I welcome any questions or comments.
Quick background: I went to GMVS, Dartmouth (captain), world junior championships, worked 6 years at GMVS then became head coach of the Québec provincial team (6 of 9 athlete we worked with moved up to natl team), coached British Columbia Alpine team (more than half moved up to natl team), and I'm starting my 3rd season here at Northwood. Just excited to keep it going and make kids go fast.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Holderness is not a ski Academy but a boarding school that has skiing. Far better education than a ski academy less high level ski training.

Tom Barbeau of Waterville is very good but I don't know much about that program.

Sorry, but I don't have much info for you.

 

Just noticed this ... Tom Barbeau was both my football coach and ski racing coach for three years at F.A.S.T.  His coaching philosophy captured an advantageous blend of the two sports that has lived on in my own skiing and coaching for decades following. Gridiron skiing is what it was all about. Dryland workouts were simply designed to put you on your ass and to keep getting up. There were no pussies on our ski team. :)

 

 

 

Edit: Meant to add/ask if you or anyone else here has raced under or worked with him?


Edited by Rich666 - 11/15/16 at 8:40pm
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