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All season skiing

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hey,

I was thinking about going skiing for a full season (2016-2017).

The most important thing for me is the ski resort (snow quality, size, etc..), next is the price.

I was wondering how much will it cost me (I also need to buy ski equpment) to live in a ski resort and ski all season (I guess like 6 months), and also which ski resorts do you recommend?

And if you already done something like that (living all season in a ski resort), I'd love to hear your experience.

 

Thanks :)

post #2 of 9
First you'll need to narrow down the resorts with a six month season. That'll probably be less than ten resorts in North America. (Are you in North America?)

Guessing that'll mean Mammoth and some Colorado resorts. (I'm not going to count the ones with summer glacier skiing as they've got lanes set up and ski teams hogging things.) Housing is going to be a huge issue in the prime months of December to March. Maybe not so bad in November, April, and May. Are you looking to live on a couch? Or a bit nicer? How good a skier are you (asking as you don't own equipment)? That will influence what terrain you will like. Do you own ski clothes? Helmet, etc.? Because without all that info, I'd just wing it and say $12000 (including food, rent, pass, equipment) if you're not going the dirt bag route.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Yeah I'm a beginner. I had like 4 weekly ski vacations so far.

I live in Europe so Europe resorts are also good.

About accommodation, the cheaper the better (I think renting an apartment with partners is the best solution for me).

I own ski clothes, gloves, glasses and that's it.

I wonder how you got to 12000$? that's like 2 times what I thought. can you break down the price for me?

I was thinking it will be more like:

1000$ ski pass

1000$ ski equipment

3000$ apartment

2000$ food and others

equals 7000$

where did i get it wrong?

post #4 of 9
She's probably figuring a higher amount for housing, food, misc factors like laundry.
post #5 of 9

Zillertal Valley - Hintertux is open 365, do it there!

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziv03 View Post

Yeah I'm a beginner. I had like 4 weekly ski vacations so far.
I live in Europe so Europe resorts are also good.
About accommodation, the cheaper the better (I think renting an apartment with partners is the best solution for me).
I own ski clothes, gloves, glasses and that's it.
I wonder how you got to 12000$? that's like 2 times what I thought. can you break down the price for me?
I was thinking it will be more like:
1000$ ski pass
1000$ ski equipment
3000$ apartment
2000$ food and others
equals 7000$
where did i get it wrong?

Well, I was figuring the US and vastly higher rent (excluding dirt bag accommodations) plus clothes. Other threads have talked about the problems with housing here near the resorts. Mostly.. There isn't much. Here a rental will likely run you a $1000 (or more) a month, if you can find it, and then you'd need a car from most of the places. And Montana is cheap compared to other areas. Certainly, sharing a dump with three other ski bums will cost a lot less. Which is why I needed more info.

Europe is clearly another story.
post #7 of 9

Ziv,

 

Prices are going to be all over the map depending on the choices you make. Many people in your position get at least a part time job to get access to discounts on skiing/gear/food/lodging.

 

Top end gear is about $2000 US list price (all my prices US), Figure about 1/2 of that if you find a good sale on last years gear. Figure about 2/3 of that for intermediate gear instead of top end gear. Figure about 1/2 of that for good used gear. So gear should run from $300-$700.

 

Cheap housing is probably going to range from $10/night to $30/night depending on where you go, what space/deals you can find and what conditions are acceptable. At Park City this last season, employee housing could be had for $12/night (including bus service to/from the resort). Last season I rented a room in a house for about $600/month that was about a 30 minute drive from the resort.

 

Season passes typically range from $400-$2000. My pass was free because of my job.

 

Food costs can easily range from $5-$40/day depending on how much ramen noodles you can stand to how much resort food you pay for. Food (including alcohol) for me was about $15/day, but most of my lunches were either paid for or subsidized (via work) and I ate at restaurants maybe once/week.

 

Transportation costs are all over the map depending on travel from home to resort and what kind of transportation you use at the resort. Many places have good enough free bus service to get by without your own transport. I used my own car, but bought studded snow tires ($600). Gas for the season was about $200. Round trip travel from home to resort was about $500 (hotels/food/gas).

 

Add miscellaneous expenses to your budget. I spent money on extra gear (hats, hand warmers), gifts for friends/bribes for bartering, and extra crap (shovel, anti freeze for the car, non-slip mats for a walkway), surprises (snow blower repair), laundry, etc. I figure I spent about $100/month, but I splurged. $25-$50/month is safer.

 

All in all I figure I got around 95 out of 120 days on snow working a full time job and netted about $10K after expenses. But most of my days on snow were spent working (i.e. teaching) and I only did this well because I am a certified instructor with a lot of experience. Entry level people are lucky to break even. People working part time on off slope jobs are lucky to get 3-4 days/week. Beginners not working are lucky to get 6 out 7 days on snow just for injury/sickness/stamina/weather reasons. Without working, doing a 6 month season for under $10K is probably doable if you're really frugal. If I wasn't working I could have easily spent $15K-$20K living in Salt Lake, Utah and skiing for 6 months.

 

Don't under estimate how physically tiring skiing every day can be. With your experience level, you could get worn out well before 6 months. The last thing you want to do is get injured because you tried to push things too hard. On the other hand, young people can often do amazing things. Good luck!

post #8 of 9

From what I have seen, heard and experienced at least in the US, Alta offers one of the very best ski bumming experiences one will ever find, Whether living and working at the Gold Miner's Daughter or Rustler's Lodge at the base or at mid-mountain at the  Alpenglow (where I worked and lived now a different name) or the Watson's Shelter, you will ski a world renowned ski area every single day of the season that gets the most snow on average in the US. .... and, it is ALWAYS light and dry. If hired among the throngs of applicants inevitably turned away, you will quickly become a family member of a tight nit group of (mostly) hard core skiers that know this terrain like an indigenous species portrayed on the National Geographic. ...and just like counting on a good friend, you will be forced out of your comfort zone on a daily basis. Rent? Nada. Commute? Nada. Food costs? Nada. Girlfriend? Nada. (bring your own) Full ski privileges? (in place of no GF privileges) Yada. Ski with fantastic skiers every day? Yada. Waking up every morning to watch patrol bomb the shit out of slide areas after a storm like it is WW3 while you eat your cornflakes? Yada. Snow so deep you don't know which way is up after a tumble? Yada. Get more face shots than Jenna Jameson? Yada. Hike 1000' vert on steep slopes in the pitch black to reach your bed after getting drunk at the Gold Miner's Daughter? Ugh!

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

From what I have seen, heard and experienced at least in the US, Alta offers one of the very best ski bumming experiences one will ever find, Whether living and working at the Gold Miner's Daughter or Rustler's Lodge at the base or at mid-mountain at the  Alpenglow (where I worked and lived now a different name) or the Watson's Shelter, you will ski a world renowned ski area every single day of the season that gets the most snow on average in the US. .... and, it is ALWAYS light and dry. If hired among the throngs of applicants inevitably turned away, you will quickly become a family member of a tight nit group of (mostly) hard core skiers that know this terrain like an indigenous species portrayed on the National Geographic. ...and just like counting on a good friend, you will be forced out of your comfort zone on a daily basis. Rent? Nada. Commute? Nada. Food costs? Nada. Girlfriend? Nada. (bring your own) Full ski privileges? (in place of no GF privileges) Yada. Ski with fantastic skiers every day? Yada. Waking up every morning to watch patrol bomb the shit out of slide areas after a storm like it is WW3 while you eat your cornflakes? Yada. Snow so deep you don't know which way is up after a tumble? Yada. Get more face shots than Jenna Jameson? Yada. Hike 1000' vert on steep slopes in the pitch black to reach your bed after getting drunk at the Gold Miner's Daughter? Ugh!

but do you have to work?

 

Ziv, if you are thinking US--do you have US citizenship? If not, you are not you should research the tourist visa regulations regarding length of stay, need to possess a return ticket, etc. If you plan to work then you need a sponsoring employer to obtain a temporary work visa for you. I have no idea what Canada's regulations are. North American resorts do hire a fair number of seasonal employees each season--most seem to be from the Southern hemisphere (a lot are students taking their summer off). 


Edited by oldgoat - 4/11/16 at 6:06pm
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