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MODDS

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Who is familiar with the MODDS model for MA?

Do you find it helpful?

Do you consider it too complex?

Do you think there is a better method for MA?

 

I am intentionally not providing additional information on what MODDS is because I am interested in how wide spread it's usage is.

To my knowledge there is no formal text book on MODDS nor is there a national standard for it.

The earliest pdf documentation I have is dated 2012. I do not know of MODDS documentation incorporating the Five Fundamentals.

I'm most interested in people outside of Central Division. If you don't use MODDS what do you use?

post #2 of 18

I don't remember hearing of this before, but I could easily have heard it and forgotten.

I finally found mention of MODDS in Issue 4 of the 2013 Central Line PSIA-C magazine.  

It's here in an article starting on page 12.  www.psia-c.org/download/central-line/2013-Issue4.pdf

 

The article explains that MODDS stands for the following:

 

M otivation of the student in taking the lesson

O bserve the skier

D escribe what you see

D etermine the cause (observed relationship between body movements and ski performance)

S uggest a prescription for change

 

 

 
 
post #3 of 18

I have heard of something like MODDS before and just reviewed it online. Upon reading the entire document it appears, as my weak memory suspects,  MODDS isn't the movement analysis itself but rather a programmatic structure within which a movement analysis is conducted. It actually does not go very far in describing the actual core components of an MA other than to suggest that it should be conducted on a technical platform: "Utilizes a quantitative, objective terminology (DIRT) to describe the skiing in precise technical terms" which is a very common instructional process that, as usual, is going to be limited to the knowledge of the student and the time constraints of a typical lesson.

 

Broken down as follows:

 

“M”    Identify the skier’s goal/MOTIVATION. Understand emotional/motivational/physical and cognitive goals of the student and use these as a filter for understanding the physical movements that you see. Using a skier’s goals and motivations is something that is going to occur at least with all fully qualified instructors and is often referred to as student centric learning. It quickly opens up a path of communication and harnesses a student’s pre-existing motivation of learning.

 

“O”    OBSERVE:  physically watching the skier. Observe the skier in a situation that provides the best possible opportunity for the skier to show what they are working on, and for you to observe what the skier is doing.  Safety should remain your primary focus.  If time allows, observe the skier from more than one viewpoint. Observation is obviously unavoidable in the context of any type of instruction and usually includes  ”student demo, safety, multiple viewpoints, etc., etc.

 

“D”     DESCRIBE:  Objective description of what you observed. Know and use your movement analysis model to describe the skiing that you see.  Utilize quantitative, objective terminology (DIRT) to describe the skiing in precise technical terms.  Challenge yourself to also describe your observations in common terms that the student can understand.  Note:   providing feedback is different that describing your movement analysis. Description, like observation is obviously unavoidable in the context of any type of instruction. Here is where a fully qualified instructor is going to use “instructor terminology” as a universal base of understanding that will need to be catered or mitigated to a student’s level of such knowledge. It is my opinion that a focus on experiential outcomes from drills and cues will far outway the efficacy of utilizing the finer components of duration, intensity, rate and timing other than for uniquely specific scenario’s.

 

“D”     DETERMINE cause and effect relationships. Describe the cause and effect relationships between the body movements and ski performance you observed.  If more that one cause and effect relationship is identified, prioritize your findings.  Understand your personal system for prioritizing movements.  Does this system account for the skier’s goal in this series of turns? Determination of what is happening like observation and description is obviously unavoidable in the context of any type of instruction. This is the “why” of what is happening and the “how” to make it happen differently. Identifying the correct input to achieve the desired output is something we facilitate in all our decision making. As in all types of instruction where retention has its limits, a sequence of priority must be utilized.

 

“S”     SUGGEST a prescription for change. Based on your findings, develop a clear and relevant prescription for change that relates to the skier’s goal.  As are the other elements listed above, suggestions are obviously unavoidable within the context of instruction and, as are observations, descriptions and determinations, suggestions are given within the context of student motivations while utilizing a balance of professional terminology with a student’s level of understanding of such terminology.

 

In conclusion, MODDS is the simple breakdown of the structure and order of the components of a typical lesson and is an acronym for the purpose of remembering the components and their order for the primary use in instructor training rather than that of training the student. MODDS is an organizational construct resulting from the reverse engineering of effective instructional practices that have existed long before the coining of this acronym. Never the less, it is an excellent topic for discussion in this thread category.

post #4 of 18
I remember reading that (I've retained my Central Division membership) and thinking, "here's another way of restating what we already do."
post #5 of 18

Right.  It doesn't sound like anything new, just a reminder to help someone get through a teaching exam without forgetting to include one of the steps.  

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your responses. Kneale and LF I think you are correct in it's just another way of restating what we already do. However, some people in Central have taken to using it as the model for how to 'correctly' approach MA. It certainly is a great class room exercise but, Rich, it is presented as the proper approach to use in every lesson.

What wasn't in the Central Line article is there is included in MODDS a more generalized way of talking about the actions of the skier. As an example; you would not say 'your in the back seat', the correct description is 'at the finish of the turns the tails of the skis are bending more than the tips'. Another correct description would be 'at the start of the turn the (new) inside ski's edge angle does not match the edge angle of the new outside ski', rather than saying 'you're not releasing the outside ski into the new turn'. These 'new' descriptives are based on the Five Fundamentals and it is being suggested that MA be focused on and described by using the the Five Fundamentals.

This has been kicking around Central since 2012 but it doesn't seem to have caught on in the rest of the country.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCC55125 View Post
 

Thank you all for your responses. Kneale and LF I think you are correct in it's just another way of restating what we already do. However, some people in Central have taken to using it as the model for how to 'correctly' approach MA. It certainly is a great class room exercise but, Rich, it is presented as the proper approach to use in every lesson.

What wasn't in the Central Line article is there is included in MODDS a more generalized way of talking about the actions of the skier. As an example; you would not say 'your in the back seat', the correct description is 'at the finish of the turns the tails of the skis are bending more than the tips'. Another correct description would be 'at the start of the turn the (new) inside ski's edge angle does not match the edge angle of the new outside ski', rather than saying 'you're not releasing the outside ski into the new turn'. These 'new' descriptives are based on the Five Fundamentals and it is being suggested that MA be focused on and described by using the the Five Fundamentals.

This has been kicking around Central since 2012 but it doesn't seem to have caught on in the rest of the country.

 

 

They actually tell you the wording you're supposed to use with a student?
Is this written down somewhere?

That's twisted.  (There's probably a better way of saying that.)

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

 

They actually tell you the wording you're supposed to use with a student?
Is this written down somewhere?

That's twisted.  (There's probably a better way of saying that.)

I guess it is about providing positive feedback, or at least avoiding negative feedback, not what actual words you use?

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

As was noted in my original post there is no formal text book on MODDS. I only have handouts from seminars run by Central.

The descriptions suggested in the text are supposed to be ski related not skier related; describe what the ski is doing not the body.

 

 

 

MODDS1.docx 3,835k .docx file  

post #10 of 18
MA should begin with ski performance. But body performance determines ski performance. The prescription for change must include body performance. The idea that information provided to the client should be couched in positive terminology has been around for a long, long time. I remember exam preps where looking for what's right and how to improve upon it was the approach the examiners wanted. I did my exams in the 1970s.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCC55125 View Post
 

As was noted in my original post there is no formal text book on MODDS. I only have handouts from seminars run by Central.

The descriptions suggested in the text are supposed to be ski related not skier related; describe what the ski is doing not the body.

 

 

 

MODDS1.docx 3,835k .docx file  


This document is offering examples of how to state things positively within that five-step framework.

 

Focusing on the new movement pattern instead of dwelling on the undesired current one is important. 

Saying things briefly is too.

The examples of positive framing in that document are very wordy. 

 

 

You ask if the MODDS approach is helpful.  

I can say yes to the five-step sequence, which I've absorbed from PSIA training over the years.

But I'm saying no to the wording examples in that document.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCC55125 View Post
 

Thank you all for your responses. Kneale and LF I think you are correct in it's just another way of restating what we already do. However, some people in Central have taken to using it as the model for how to 'correctly' approach MA. It certainly is a great class room exercise but, Rich, it is presented as the proper approach to use in every lesson.

What wasn't in the Central Line article is there is included in MODDS a more generalized way of talking about the actions of the skier. As an example; you would not say 'your in the back seat', the correct description is 'at the finish of the turns the tails of the skis are bending more than the tips'. Another correct description would be 'at the start of the turn the (new) inside ski's edge angle does not match the edge angle of the new outside ski', rather than saying 'you're not releasing the outside ski into the new turn'. These 'new' descriptives are based on the Five Fundamentals and it is being suggested that MA be focused on and described by using the the Five Fundamentals.

This has been kicking around Central since 2012 but it doesn't seem to have caught on in the rest of the country.

 

RCC, yes, you are eking out a good point regarding an aspect of MA in terms of the MA's perspective on cause and effect. One way the delineate cause and effect is to describe both the inputs and the outputs from the perspective of the body. Such as "because you are over rotating (your torso) at the end of the turn, your torso is not faced properly into the next turn".

 

Another and perhaps more effective way to describe inputs and outputs is speaking relative to the body's input and the ski's output such as "because you are over rotating at the end of the turn this is causing the tail of the ski to wash out and negatively effecting the direction of the ski for the next turn". So, the cause (input) being a rotary movement and the effect (output) being how the ski reacts seems to be the "full" delineation of cause and effect and that the body-to-body cause and effect is really not a complete description because the effect really ends with the ski. Here, we are sort of reverse engineering the kinetic chain from its conventional perspective of "from foot to shoulder" to "from movement to ski". Technically speaking the reaction of the ski could'should be seen as the end of the kinetic chain of movement. 

 

Now, if we base the cause or input within the framework of the 5 fundamental skills we now have a cause mapping orientation for the identification, genesis (thinking) and categorization of the cause and one that can be shared unilaterally due to the common language used in regards to the 5 skills.

 

Additionally, we look at mapping the effect or output/outcome through the ski. Identifying output through mapping ski pressure control, ski tipping and ski rotary are the true and final results of our movements.

post #13 of 18

We find out what they want out of the lesson.

We watch them and figure out how they are messing up and what would fix the issue, relative to their goal.

We give them a positive description of what they are doing that is messing them up (careful here!).

Then we describe or show them what they need to do differently, and work on that until the lightbulb moment happens.

 

The rest is fine tuning, empowerment, and motivation.

 

--keep refining the new movement pattern during the lesson until it creates an improved ski-snow interaction (lightbulb moment!) 

--get them to sense something in the ski-snow interaction when they get it right, so they can reproduce it after the lesson is over

--work on paying attention to this sensation (a skill in itself) 

--identify a mental cue that will remind them to use the new movement pattern on each turn, every turn, every run, every day  

--get them committed to using that cue and seeking that sensation even while skiing "just for fun," so the new will become embedded in muscle memory

post #14 of 18

Drawing on the previously existing motivational assets of the student is key in that it affects the entire teaching process from establishing effective communication at the start to facilitating the deliverables throughout the lesson to establishing a strong resonance factor that carries the message well beyond the duration of the lesson. The motivational interviewing technique of teaching and guidance is the most effective way to do this.

'

post #15 of 18
'Back seat' isn't a particularly effective or specific descriptor. How are they backseat? One can be folded over at the waist and be back seat. One might have lateral movement issues making 'back seat' a effect of a very different cause. The analogy might be how one describes color by hue, saturation, tone, temperature rather than emotively or culturally. Maybe Albers should have started a painter's level progression system with fees and all, but i guess that was Bauhaus tuition. smile.gif
post #16 of 18

Here's Albers teaching at the Bauhaus, critiquing the results of an introductory 3-d assignment. 

 

And here are some examples of student work from that assignment.  Divergence comes to mind.

 

At least at this point he wasn't into rigid progressions of the sort we've been describing.

The risk factors associated with failure to meet the standards in art classes are different

compared to skiing, as is the trajectory of success. 

post #17 of 18

Great example of complexifying (I just made that up) something that needs simplification.  As LF said above, the statement examples are just horrid.  What is the foundering skier going to get from, "At the start of the turn the tips and tails of the skis are twisting at different rates."  YUCK.

 

Yes, ask what the skier wants from the lesson.  And, sometimes what they want isn't what they need, so after discussion and observation, be ready to explain that.

Yes, observe, always starting at the feet.

Be very careful with a description of what's wrong.  We want to get the student going in the right direction, not get their head swimming with too many things and a bunch of gobbledygook.

Cause & effect relationships?  Again, be very simple.

Suggest a change.  Sure.  But...

 

Find the single most important movement the student needs to make an improvement.  One thing learned in a lesson can be a great lesson.  A half dozen things briefly touched is a terrible lesson.  Remember, when we learn something new, or tougher, replace something old, we can only think of one thing at a time.  We need to repeat that one new thing a few hundred times to "learn" it, and a few thousand times to replace something else.  That's just the way the human brain works.

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 

SSG, MODDS also complexifies (I like that word) the ways to do MA. Yes you can observe from Ground Up. However Overall Image First and Skills Concept Based are also accepted ways of doing a MA.

In Overall Image First you observe the overall image of the skier for the following: Turn shape, rhythm, symmetry; Stance, fore-aft, lateral balance, stance width; Ski snow interaction, what are the skis doing throughout phases of the turn; Center of mass, what is the path of the center of mass; Legs; Upper body.

In Skills Concept Based MA you look for: Balance, fore-aft and lateral; Edging, what body parts are causing the skis to perform as they are; Rotary, what body parts are generating the rotary forces; Pressuer, what movements is the skier using it manage forces/pressuer.

Then there is a list of phrases and elements that are to be used to define what you have observed. Things such as: Tactics, Image from small body parts/big body parts, Movement from arc to arc, Skill to skill relationship, Ski snow interaction and on and on.

Your work complexifying sums it up real well. They've forgotten KISS for both the student and instructor.

I'm attending the first summer clinic Wednesday and should have more information after that.

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