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Skiers Edge

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I just bought a used one (SE III) This is an older model but I think it will work to keep me in better shape.

I am not sure exactly how I am supposed to use it but right now I just have the main band connected and I am banging it into the stops on both sides. The intermediate band seems to limit you to about 60% of the transit.

 

I am not sure how much "training" I am getting but it does seem to be good exercise. I already modified it. I put an electrical counter on it so I can track my use.

post #2 of 18

Welcome to EpicSki!  I have an even older model, the SE II.  Do find it useful for conditioning.

 

Here are related threads from recent years that may have useful info.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/127349/tips-on-skiers-edge-purchase

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/113241/skiers-edge

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/131934/anyone-using-the-skiers-edge

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have been playing with this for a week or so now. I am doing about 1000 cycles a day and I do feel the improvement. It may not be making me a better skier but I think I will be able to ski longer. It does seem to be making me stronger. The counter I added makes it easier to see how I am doing with my goal. 

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by gfretwell View Post
 

I have been playing with this for a week or so now. I am doing about 1000 cycles a day and I do feel the improvement. It may not be making me a better skier but I think I will be able to ski longer. It does seem to be making me stronger. The counter I added makes it easier to see how I am doing with my goal. 


Thanks for the update.

 

Being stronger in the right muscles certainly seems to help me as an older skier.  Plus I like having a more ski-specific way for cardio work.  I track by time, as opposed to number of cycles.

post #5 of 18
I disagree that using the skiers edge will build enough muscle for skiing.

I used one for a few weeks, years ago, and besides being incredibly boring, it did not do much fur my legs, certainly compared to a leg press.

I categorized into the gimmick slot
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

I disagree that using the skiers edge will build enough muscle for skiing.

I used one for a few weeks, years ago, and besides being incredibly boring, it did not do much fur my legs, certainly compared to a leg press.

I categorized into the gimmick slot

You must have been doing something wrong.   You must not have had the tension adjusted properly or something. Or you can already press 1000 lbs.

 

 I have an S4 so it is quite a bit higher  in the center. 

 

You are supposed to get the carriage to the end of the track. 

 

MIne has the ability to allow the footpads to swivel fore and aft (and I do) as well as side to side. 

 

I find it very effective for quads and hamstrings and cardio Although I must admit, I don't use my quads much when skiing. Mostly hamstrings. But I am seldomly if ever a backseater

post #7 of 18
To build muscle and strength you do eight to twelve reps to failure.

Anything that you can do hundreds of reps will take a very long time to build muscle.

Cardio is another story, even though I can think of many other more enjoyable ways to accomplish the same thing.
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

To build muscle and strength you do eight to twelve reps to failure.

Anything that you can do hundreds of reps will take a very long time to build muscle.

Cardio is another story, even though I can think of many other more enjoyable ways to accomplish the same thing UO​y

I CAN'T DO HUNDREDS , I WAS doing  1:15  MINUTE. which IS ABOUT 60. TURNS  = TO A FULL LENGTH GS.

I can't explain what you are doing.

 

 

 

 

And unless you are running World Cup Downhill and pulling 4 G's how much brute strength do you need.

 

do you know what properly stacked means?

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 

I am an old guy (70) who embarrassed myself the last time I went skiing (caught a mountain with my face) and in the post mortem, I figured out I was just tired after a few hours and could not stick an edge when I needed it. My objective is not strength, just endurance.

post #10 of 18
Strength will give you endurance, because you will stress your muscles less.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

I get a lot of regular exercise, hiking and some climbing but I found sticking that edge is another muscle that I was not building. I think if I am working on planting that down hill foot and working the edge on the machine I am working on those muscles. I know I felt it burn more when I started than I am feeling it now. Even if this is not really duplicating a skiing motion exactly, being on my feet and working the balance and leg aspect of this is not going to hurt me. If nothing else, I am not sitting on the couch watching TV ;)

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

Strength will give you endurance, because you will stress your muscles less.

 

Not true. Using your muscles less will stress your muscles less.   

post #13 of 18
What I meant to say is that lifting heavy weights will make you stronger, which means that skiing will not stress you as much, she you will be able to ski longer,ie have more endurance
post #14 of 18

It's nice to have strength, but proper  technique, tactic & timing will affect endurance more.  

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

It's nice to have strength, but proper  technique, tactic & timing will affect endurance more.  


Bingo!

 

However, getting into better shape is still helpful for the older skier who is working to become an advanced skier going off onto the ungroomed more than 50% of the time.  Just having regular high level lessons would not have been enough for me (starting over 50 after long hiatus).

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

I am not going back in the ungroomed areas, at least not on purpose. I am just trying to keep up with my grand kids.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

It's nice to have strength, but proper  technique, tactic & timing will affect endurance more.  

I am by no means muscular. When not injured (which I am right now...freak ski fall, after running a GS course I inadvertently skied into untracked snow with a layer of ice beneath and got slapped down immediately, if not sooner.  Landed a direct hit on my right shoulder) I play tennis 5 days a week and mostly singles. I am 64 in May, and mostly ski on a 188cm 30.5 Meter Atomic D2 FIS Race Stock GS ski.

 

 

Technique........ Tactic......timing..........finesse!   I know how to turn 'em with minimal effort!   No brute strength necessary. In fact back in the straight ski days, one of my buddies who was a damn good skier, by the way, could never ever beat me in a race course. He worked out, lifted ...was basically an animal in the gym with a stupid high pain tolerance!  Actually, I play a guy in tennis now very  often who works out like a fiend. His calves look like footballs and he is an absolute animal lifting, working out and running a crazy cable line here.  He also runs stairs backwards!

 

He also clinches the shit out of his racquet and attempts to swing and hit the ball as hard as he can.....Guess what!  I am loose relaxed and use proper technique. He hits totally flat and I hit with much topspin!   He rarely if ever beats me!  All abolut technique and relaxed focus!

 

So Rod....ya just got this wrong.   King Grump!  Right on bro!


Edited by Atomicman - 4/5/16 at 10:07am
post #18 of 18
Ok, no training needed if you're a great skier. I get it.
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