or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Breck Lesson Club?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Did Breck offer the lesson club this year? If so, how much did it cost and how about many students were in each class? Are there plans to offer the lesson club for next season? Thanks!
post #2 of 18

Yes.  I think it was about $600, but don't quote me on that. There were about 10 in each class, with about 8 showing up on any given day. Yes, it will be offered again next season. The deadline to sign up is September, I believe.

post #3 of 18

It was $360 for 10 days this season.  Next season the price is going up by about 40%.  Call the ski and ride school to get specifics, or perhaps a current participant will check in (paging @bounceswoosh).

 

Mike

post #4 of 18

Here's what I got in the official email two weeks ago:

 

We are excited as a school to offer our Club program which features consistency and comradery within groups as well as keeping class sizes down. With consistency there is more opportunity to develop your skills and progress with the same pro week after week. You will get to experience a great group dynamic and explore our mountain!

 

Program Details

  • Ski with the same group and pro for the duration of the ten week program
  • Groups will be formed by the school based on ability level given at time of registration and pro requests
  • Sign up for Thursdays, Fridays, or Saturdays.  At registration you choose which day of the week you would like to join and your program runs on that day of the week only
    • Skiing available Thursday, Friday, or Saturday
    • Snowboarding available on Saturdays only
  • You may add additional days of Club at a discounted rate
  • Groups meet at 9:30am at the Vista Haus on Peak 8
  • At the time of booking you will receive a questionnaire to let us know your level and pro request
  • If you have a group of 8 or more and would like to form a custom group please emailLrn2ski@vailresorts.com
 

Program Dates:

 
 

Program Price:

  • One Day (Thursdays, Fridays, OR Saturdays) - $420
  • Two Days (choose two set days for the duration of the program) - $770
  • Three Days (Thursdays, Fridays, AND Saturdays) - $1040
  • Fourth and Fifth Custom Days - additional $270 each
 

Program Restrictions:

  • Participants may only join on the weekday they select and cannot choose different days each week.
  • Cancellations/Refunds will only be offered before the program begins.
  • Participants must be 15 years old when the program begins.
  • Participants must be strong intermediate skill level or above (able to warm up on blue runs, comfortable linking turns on blue runs).
  • Participants may request a pro in the online questionnaire, pro requests are not guaranteed unless a custom group is formed.
  • Participants must have a Vail Resorts Season Pass valid at Breckenridge.  Get yours now!
 

Purchase by calling us at 888.576.2754!


On sale through September 30, 2016.

 
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks bounceswoosh for the info. Any recommendations for instructors to request. I've been told that I'm a mid-level 8 to 9 (on a good day) when I've taken lessons at the VR ski schools. I like to ski all terrain, faster on easier stuff and more moderate speeds when on more challenging terrain or conditions. I like to hear it straight and don't really need to be coddled. If I'm skiing poorly I want to be told so directly. No complement sandwich needed. I'm pretty analytical so technical jargon is welcome. I work on technique and drills while skiing with my kids. And I like nice long walks on the beach. wink.gif
post #6 of 18

Not Carl Richter (Yogi) then.  He can be a very good instructor, but he's running primarily a social club.  Dirk, Kneale, Matt, Jenn, and Franz are all possibilities.  It'd be tough to get in with Franz as he has a following that is both booking him out and controlling size of the class.  Patrick also might be a choice.

 

I don't know if Doug Burg is doing the lesson club, but he is a really good instructor.  He'd probably be my number 1 choice.

 

Mike

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosper View Post

Thanks bounceswoosh for the info. Any recommendations for instructors to request. I've been told that I'm a mid-level 8 to 9 (on a good day) when I've taken lessons at the VR ski schools. I like to ski all terrain, faster on easier stuff and more moderate speeds when on more challenging terrain or conditions. I like to hear it straight and don't really need to be coddled. If I'm skiing poorly I want to be told so directly. No complement sandwich needed. I'm pretty analytical so technical jargon is welcome. I work on technique and drills while skiing with my kids. And I like nice long walks on the beach. wink.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 

Not Carl Richter (Yogi) then.  He can be a very good instructor, but he's running primarily a social club.  Dirk, Kneale, Matt, Jenn, and Franz are all possibilities.  It'd be tough to get in with Franz as he has a following that is both booking him out and controlling size of the class.  Patrick also might be a choice.

 

I don't know if Doug Burg is doing the lesson club, but he is a really good instructor.  He'd probably be my number 1 choice.

 

Mike

 

Mike, if you're saying Yogi doesn't teach at a very high level, I disagree - but Prosper asked for reasonable group sizes, and Yogi's groups are huge. And custom. And almost certainly already filled.

 

Of the names you've mentioned - and I'm assuming Prosper is looking for weekends - Dirk already has massive custom groups on the weekends. Don't know about @Kneale Brownson - I think he usually teaches levels 6 and 7, though? Matt and Franz are already booked with custom groups. Jenn doesn't commit to teaching club on the weekends; she subs here and there. I'm considering putting together a custom Saturday group, possibly with Patrick, although some other names are also on my list. I'm ... not familiar with Doug Burg. You've piqued my curiosity!

 

 

 @Prosper -  the problem you're going to run into is that all the well known instructors are likely already tapped for custom groups, and you aren't known to the people organizing the custom groups - which are already being created. Be aware that level 8 and 9 lesson club groups are typically graded on a harsher curve than walk-ups - at least in terms of pace. This might be a good reason to go in without trying for a particular instructor or custom group - if you keep it open, it's easier to switch around if you find that the group is too fast or slow for you; or too instruction oriented, or not instruction-oriented enough. I actually started out in a custom Saturday group this season, but it wasn't quite what I wanted, so I shopped around a bit and found one that worked better for me. Officially, you have an assigned group; unofficially, they want people to be in groups they enjoy.

 

If you'd like, we could ski together at Breck some upcoming weekend, and I could give you my honest assessment (for whatever that's worth) of where you'd fit in the group levels for pace and ability. And terrain preference.

 

I'm bummed that we have more or less assigned groups now, rather than being free-floating. The plus sides primarily come with the custom groups - they can choose exactly who's in the group, and have leeway to meet where and when they want. Rand Brooks' group met at 10 mile instead of Vista; my JJ group met at the base of Peak 9 at 9am, except on a big powder day, when we got there at 8:20 to hit the Quicksilver right as it opened. 

 

OR ignore all of the above and just sign up as a level 8 or 9 and see what happens. I guarantee you'll have fun, learn a lot, and skip lines on days when it's definitely worth it.

post #8 of 18
Doug Berg does not usually teach club lessons. I do not know about next year but I would guess not.
post #9 of 18
I'll toss my name in the hat to ski with you also. Also give my "for what it's worth" eval. What bounce said is pretty much dead on.
post #10 of 18

Youngsters, Just wait until you get a bit older and you could join the Over the Hill Gang at Copper Mtn.

 

This year the cost was $399 which included 52 days of guided skiing with an instructor. 

 

Some serious instructions during the day.

 

Some serious fun skiing the mountain.

 

http://www.coppercolorado.com/winter/ski_and_ride_school/adult_seasonal_programs/over_the_hill_gang

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ali pine View Post
 

Youngsters, Just wait until you get a bit older and you could join the Over the Hill Gang at Copper Mtn.

 

This year the cost was $399 which included 52 days of guided skiing with an instructor. 

 

Some serious instructions during the day.

 

Some serious fun skiing the mountain.

 

http://www.coppercolorado.com/winter/ski_and_ride_school/adult_seasonal_programs/over_the_hill_gang

 

In 13 years, I'll definitely check it out ;-) Oops - 12 - losing track!

 

The price for the Breck lesson club was comparable until this season, when it got much higher. Of course, it's not intended as a seniors perk.

post #12 of 18

Monique, no disrespect to Yogi -- I think he can be an excellent teacher.  That being said, his groups often denigrate to idle social chatter without much instruction.  He's fun to ski with, but he also attracts a very large group.  If you are looking for instruction, then I think that you'll find a more intense learning experience elsewhere.

 

Mike

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 

Monique, no disrespect to Yogi -- I think he can be an excellent teacher.  That being said, his groups often denigrate to idle social chatter without much instruction.  He's fun to ski with, but he also attracts a very large group.  If you are looking for instruction, then I think that you'll find a more intense learning experience elsewhere.

 

Mike

 

Yeah, that may be true. On the other hand, following him in the bumps is a revelation. (That's true for a number of these instructors.) He finds such a smooth line, you don't even think you're skiing the bumps. It's so obvious and easy. Then you try to do the same thing yourself, and you realize how good he is!

 

I would say that in my experience, the upper level lesson groups are only heavy on instruction in the early season. Once the upper mountain is open, it's more about lapping terrain with some targeted feedback. Of course, it depends on the instructor and on what the group wants. In my experience, they (we) want skiing more than they (we) want instruction. One of the custom Saturday groups was the exception - they really wanted lots of drills and such. I ended up switching because it messed me up. Which, funny thing, now that I've read Weems' Brilliant Skiing and am halfway through Inner Skiing - makes perfect sense. 

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

If you'd like, we could ski together at Breck some upcoming weekend, and I could give you my honest assessment (for whatever that's worth) of where you'd fit in the group levels for pace and ability. And terrain preference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post

I'll toss my name in the hat to ski with you also. Also give my "for what it's worth" eval.

You all are making me blush. I've never felt so wanted. I'd love to ski with some other bears. Let me look at our upcoming weekends and talk to my better half. Hopefully, we'll be able to figure something out.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 

Monique, no disrespect to Yogi -- I think he can be an excellent teacher.  That being said, his groups often denigrate to idle social chatter without much instruction.  He's fun to ski with, but he also attracts a very large group.  If you are looking for instruction, then I think that you'll find a more intense learning experience elsewhere.

 

Mike

 

Having been a guest skier in a number of instructor lead season long groups, it is my experience that the above is a tendency with all or most. The social component eventually drowns out the instructional aspect. Good instruction for many, both student and instructor is a high energy intellectual process that can be difficult to sustain all day. Because many aspects of socialization and instruction may be considered as mutually exclusive, there will be a natural gravitation to the easier, social side of things. An instructor may feel awkward or that it is unhelpful to offer instruction beyond that of what is requested within the group and is aware that the social component may be the driving factor to membership sales. Instructor are instructors because the love to teach. It was my feeling that most of the instructors wished to offer more than what is asked for in many of these situations. I think this can provide the unique opportunity for a group member that is dead set on learning. As long as a member is determined to keep themselves from letting the social aspect take over their learning process and does not feel too awkward about standing out a bit, a special focus from the instructor may simply be there for the taking.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 

Monique, no disrespect to Yogi -- I think he can be an excellent teacher.  That being said, his groups often denigrate to idle social chatter without much instruction.  He's fun to ski with, but he also attracts a very large group.  If you are looking for instruction, then I think that you'll find a more intense learning experience elsewhere.

 

Mike

 

Having been a guest skier in a number of instructor lead season long groups, it is my experience that the above is a tendency with all or most. The social component eventually drowns out the instructional aspect. Good instruction for many, both student and instructor is a high energy intellectual process that can be difficult to sustain all day. Because many aspects of socialization and instruction may be considered as mutually exclusive, there will be a natural gravitation to the easier, social side of things. An instructor may feel awkward or that it is unhelpful to offer instruction beyond that of what is requested within the group and is aware that the social component may be the driving factor to membership sales. Instructor are instructors because the love to teach. It was my feeling that most of the instructors wished to offer more than what is asked for in many of these situations. I think this can provide the unique opportunity for a group member that is dead set on learning. As long as a member is determined to keep themselves from letting the social aspect take over their learning process and does not feel too awkward about standing out a bit, a special focus from the instructor may simply be there for the taking.

 

Kind of agree, kind of not. It depends on the degree of difference between your interests and those of the rest of the class. Early season, when nothing interesting is open, even the hardest charging classes do mostly drills.

 

Again, I'm talking about the highest level classes, 8s and 9s, which is what the OP asked about. As you move up that spectrum, you are moving not just in ski ability but also in pace. Socialization makes it sound like people are just hanging out and chatting, which I haven't found to be the case except for the last day of the season, when there's a natural tendency to reminiscing. It tends to be more that people want to ski at a fast pace once terrain is open. A lot of people, like me, have the majority of their ski days in these lesson groups, so they double as lessons and also guided skiing. Too much instruction would cut into my skiing time.

 

It's not like there's no instruction, but it might be a focus during a warmup run, or it might be an individual pointer after skiing with you half the day. Or it might be more. Yogi, mentioned above, does have a big, social class. I got a late start one morning and was having trouble meeting up with my group, so I asked Yogi if I could join his. Honestly, if I'd realized how large his group was, I wouldn't have asked - just for the sake of the other people in it. Anyway, at one point after lunch, I asked about my difficulty in heavier snow - and he stopped to talk to me specifically about the things he'd been teaching the class throughout the season. After a few minutes, I felt guilty and awkward as everyone stood around (waiting patiently, I have to say), and honestly I hadn't wanted to stop for that long. I might not have felt so guilty if I'd actually been a part of his class - and I probably wouldn't have needed it, because I would have gotten it when the rest of the class did.

 

I've struggled with bumps at various points during the season. While Matt usually has a pretty light hand when it comes to instruction, he gave me a ton of attention one day, working with me directly - race car sounds throughout the turn to distract "self 1" (inner skiing). Drawing a line straight down the bump run regardless of shape, and having me plant my pole on that line the whole way down. Stuff like that. In that case, everyone else in the group just skied at their own pace, and I met them at the bottom.

 

Then there was a time that Patrick said he was going to tell us about some concept, but he didn't get back to it. I asked about it at the top of Whale's Tail. My friend gave me the stinkeye and said, "Come on, ski!" It turned out we were close to when the T-Bar shut down, and she didn't want to miss another lap. Honestly, I normally pay pretty close attention to that, too. So we skied.

 

So ... it just depends. I agree that you may be able to get a lot of individual pointers even if the group as a whole is more interested in skiing, but if you're trying to get a lot of feedback and it means that the group is standing around waiting, that's not cool, either.

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

Kind of agree, kind of not. It depends on the degree of difference between your interests and those of the rest of the class. Early season, when nothing interesting is open, even the hardest charging classes do mostly drills.

 

Again, I'm talking about the highest level classes, 8s and 9s, which is what the OP asked about. As you move up that spectrum, you are moving not just in ski ability but also in pace. Socialization makes it sound like people are just hanging out and chatting, which I haven't found to be the case except for the last day of the season, when there's a natural tendency to reminiscing. It tends to be more that people want to ski at a fast pace once terrain is open. A lot of people, like me, have the majority of their ski days in these lesson groups, so they double as lessons and also guided skiing. Too much instruction would cut into my skiing time.

 

It's not like there's no instruction, but it might be a focus during a warmup run, or it might be an individual pointer after skiing with you half the day. Or it might be more. Yogi, mentioned above, does have a big, social class. I got a late start one morning and was having trouble meeting up with my group, so I asked Yogi if I could join his. Honestly, if I'd realized how large his group was, I wouldn't have asked - just for the sake of the other people in it. Anyway, at one point after lunch, I asked about my difficulty in heavier snow - and he stopped to talk to me specifically about the things he'd been teaching the class throughout the season. After a few minutes, I felt guilty and awkward as everyone stood around (waiting patiently, I have to say), and honestly I hadn't wanted to stop for that long. I might not have felt so guilty if I'd actually been a part of his class - and I probably wouldn't have needed it, because I would have gotten it when the rest of the class did.

 

I've struggled with bumps at various points during the season. While Matt usually has a pretty light hand when it comes to instruction, he gave me a ton of attention one day, working with me directly - race car sounds throughout the turn to distract "self 1" (inner skiing). Drawing a line straight down the bump run regardless of shape, and having me plant my pole on that line the whole way down. Stuff like that. In that case, everyone else in the group just skied at their own pace, and I met them at the bottom.

 

Then there was a time that Patrick said he was going to tell us about some concept, but he didn't get back to it. I asked about it at the top of Whale's Tail. My friend gave me the stinkeye and said, "Come on, ski!" It turned out we were close to when the T-Bar shut down, and she didn't want to miss another lap. Honestly, I normally pay pretty close attention to that, too. So we skied.

 

So ... it just depends. I agree that you may be able to get a lot of individual pointers even if the group as a whole is more interested in skiing, but if you're trying to get a lot of feedback and it means that the group is standing around waiting, that's not cool, either.

 

Up until a couple of years ago, I skied with a variety of the lesson club groups.  I know that there are now custom groups which the group can decide their philosophy. However, prior to the custom group, I skied with many groups who would get upset if the instructor stopped and instructed at all.   It seems like many people wanted non-stop guided skiing only and would be visibly rude if others in the group wanted more instruction.  Additionally, there were regular paying customers mixed into the group, who actually wanted a ski lesson not guided, lift line skipping groups.  There were groups I would avoid because of this.  While there are many aspects of the new format I feel are negative, the ability to have custom groups avoid some of the prior issues.

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post
 
Up until a couple of years ago, I skied with a variety of the lesson club groups.  I know that there are now custom groups which the group can decide their philosophy. However, prior to the custom group, I skied with many groups who would get upset if the instructor stopped and instructed at all.   It seems like many people wanted non-stop guided skiing only and would be visibly rude if others in the group wanted more instruction.  Additionally, there were regular paying customers mixed into the group, who actually wanted a ski lesson not guided, lift line skipping groups.  There were groups I would avoid because of this.  While there are many aspects of the new format I feel are negative, the ability to have custom groups avoid some of the prior issues.

 

They don't mix lesson club and walk-up students anymore, which is definitely a good thing for both sets of people.

 

I'm going to change my tune - I agree with you. When I pay for a walk-up lesson, I expect a pretty solid day of instruction. When I go to lesson club mid season, I expect to get a lot of vertical, a few tips, and possibly hand-holding on runs I'd be apprehensive about skiing for the first time on my own (got several of those this season - Broadway, Twin Chutes, Needle's Eye, ESP, Snow White). And sometimes an introduction to nice little stashes that I wouldn't have found on my own.

 

I did a detailed write-up of all my lessons this season on TheSkiDiva, but I did it inside the members-only section for ladies who have posted enough to see it. I plan to put it up on my blog with some tweaking, but you know ... intentions, time ... anyway, going back through, I got some instruction out of all of these classes. The exception being one big powder day when we were chasing first tracks, and none of us wanted instruction - we just wanted to charge.

 

That being said, the first few years I did the program I was a level 6 and then 7 skier, and then an 8, and I got a lot more instruction. These days, I still have plenty to learn (I call myself an 8 who skis with 9s), but I have a strong foundation and am making very subtle tweaks. For me at this point, it makes a lot of sense to just carry an intention throughout the day and occasionally check in with myself. Like the "snot dripping" thing Jenn's been teaching me. That's more of a visual than a drill. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching