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Why do my hips need to be over my feet? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Amazing! We're almost to page 4 before getting to the bottom of page one. smile.gif
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post
 

it was a long post and I only was commenting on the last part.. I guess I should have just deleted it all except the part I wanted to highlight? would that have satisfied you?

 

Yeeshh..

"font size insecurity", I'm pretty sure that was a joke. I thought it was pretty funny.

post #33 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Well, OK, if you were in a LI exam and everything else was above standard but he gave a simple "hips over feet" suggestion, and added you are overflexing, then I think I know what he may be saying.

I suspect he means this:  you need to flex forward at the ankles, and you need to stand taller.  Flexing forward at the ankles, so shins are tilted forward, will put everything above the knees forward.  Then standing taller removes the "overflexing" part of his comments.  This will get you into a position from which to make foot/leg movements that will allow you to control your turns better.


It's a misconception that people who crouch are always back seat.  They may be centered.  But they are so low and folder up that their range of motion is limited.  This low stance makes reacting to turn forces hard.  Agility goes down the drain.  Maybe this is the thing he was talking about.

The first step is learning to keep your ankles bent forward enough to get your shins tilted instead of upright.  This will put your knees more forward than they are now (I'm guessing, of coures).
Then lift your hips up higher so the crouch is gone.  Your thighs will be more upright than they are now (again, I'm guessing).
Then stand taller with the rest of your upper body.  Viola, less crouching!  Hips over feet!  (Well, not exactly, but that's the admonition that gets people into this more upright position.)

Once you've got that more upright stance dialed in as your "home base," you should be able to move on skis with much more agility. More agility means higher skill level potential.  So that's why "hips over feet" is a common saying.  It'll get you ready to move towards your LII.  (All this assumes I'm guessing right.)



Oh, I just went back and reviewed your OP.  I now see this is a problem he saw only in the last 1/3 of the turn.  
Hmmmm, not sure how to work with that.   Let's see what others say.

He said ankle flex looked good, just too much flex in the knee(s). I don't think he liked the fact that all joints weren't flexed equally...
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Very good, and first, congrats! smile.gif Just curious, but what boot are you using and how big are you*? Often at the L1 and even L2 level, gear issues can be pretty significant. Some skiers are very good at compensating within the L1 or even L2 standard. Just wondering if your set up is part of the issue or not.

.

Salomon x-max 120's. 6', 195.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post

Salomon x-max 120's. 6', 195.

Pretty soft boot for a 120 and a bigger guy though... Any range of motion issues like poor dorsiflexion/ limited Achilles, etc..? What binding are you in?
If there's a lot of knee going on, the hips have to drop back to keep your CoM over the BoS... sure it works, but doesn't allow the same accessible range of motion and resultant 'balance' though the arc that equal flexing of the joints will.
post #36 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Pretty soft boot for a 120 and a bigger guy though... Any range of motion issues like poor dorsiflexion/ limited Achilles, etc..? What binding are you in?
If there's a lot of knee going on, the hips have to drop back to keep your CoM over the BoS... sure it works, but doesn't allow the same accessible range of motion and resultant 'balance' though the arc that equal flexing of the joints will.

Marker griffons on Rossi E88's @178

Possibly a little less than ideal flex in Achilles... Right lower Achilles always sore after long day of skiing.
post #37 of 40
Any good boot folks near you? Any video of you doing L1 tasks?
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtViking View Post


Marker griffons on Rossi E88's @178

Possibly a little less than ideal flex in Achilles... Right lower Achilles always sore after long day of skiing.

If you are in an Xmax, and you have not had them "fitted" for your heels, sometimes the little "bump out" in the heel area grabs your Achilles a little hard. If you are over flexing the boot (sounds possible) then you may just banging the top edge of your heel against the shell. (I had this problem)

 

The way to check your flexibility for ROM in the ankle is to sit in a chair that puts your tibfib at 90 degrees to the floor (barefoot) and allows you to sit with your femurs parallel to the floor. Sit with your back 90 degrees to the floor  (what boot fitters call 90-90-90) Then keeping your heel on the floor, raise your forefoot as high as you can (using only your leg muscles) Have someone measure the resulting angle from the floor to the bottom of your foot. Average should be 11-17 degrees. Anything less than 11 would be considered limited range of motion. more than 17 might be considered hyper-mobile.

 

Griffon's have a delta of almost 5 mm. It's very possible you have too much forward lean/ramp

 

What size are your boots (primarily boot sole length)

post #39 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dchan View Post

If you are in an Xmax, and you have not had them "fitted" for your heels, sometimes the little "bump out" in the heel area grabs your Achilles a little hard. If you are over flexing the boot (sounds possible) then you may just banging the top edge of your heel against the shell. (I had this problem)

The way to check your flexibility for ROM in the ankle is to sit in a chair that puts your tibfib at 90 degrees to the floor (barefoot) and allows you to sit with your femurs parallel to the floor. Sit with your back 90 degrees to the floor  (what boot fitters call 90-90-90) Then keeping your heel on the floor, raise your forefoot as high as you can (using only your leg muscles) Have someone measure the resulting angle from the floor to the bottom of your foot. Average should be 11-17 degrees. Anything less than 11 would be considered limited range of motion. more than 17 might be considered hyper-mobile.

Griffon's have a delta of almost 5 mm. It's very possible you have too much forward lean/ramp

What size are your boots (primarily boot sole length)

27.5 mondo, can't remember bsl... 317 I think. Will check in a bit.
post #40 of 40

That's close enough. thanks.

 

The 27.5 will have a little less effective "ramp" due to the fact it's a longer boot sole. Shells use a base line of 26.x mondo for their advertisements. Longer or shorter shells mean we need to make slight adjustments to calculate ramp.

 

When you get a chance, have someone help you measure your ROM. Also double check your shell fit.

 

Do you have the spoilers still installed on those boots? If so you might want to pull them and see how it affects your skiing. You can try doing some playing with your over forward lean and see how it affects your skiing as well. Get with someone you trust or get some video to evaluate what's going on.

 

If you have limited ROM, it can sometimes mean lifting the heel internally in the boot (to give you more space to flex the ankle), then lifting the toe externally to compensate for the internal lift.

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