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MA for Mountainbum

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hi all! I have really enjoyed reading all of the posts on here and gaining a lot of valuable advice. I went skiing today at Loveland--great conditions, but not so great for MA! Most of the runs had heavy, wet crud but it was still a ton of fun. That said, here are a couple of decent videos out of a bunch we took today. They are on a traditional camera so we can't zoom in or out while taking video. Feel free to tear 'em apart....I take a lot of instructor clinics so I'm used to it!

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2DH0qSe7hjY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lIqYm_OdCRg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

post #2 of 19
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ah, thanks:D How do I embed the videos so I know for later?

post #4 of 19
Bracket VIDEO Bracket url Bracket / video Bracket use all caps VIDEO inside the brackets


Tutorial @ http://www.epicski.com/a/epicski-image-and-video-tutorial
Edited by slider - 3/24/16 at 9:16pm
post #5 of 19

When you make your post, you click on that little icon on the top that looks like film.

Then this appears, and you put the URL of the video in it.  Done.

post #6 of 19

What instructions have you been given to eliminate the stem?

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

I haven't really had the stem pointed out until recently, but I have been told to work on my tipping movements to help with that.

post #8 of 19
You ar turning the skis a lot. Let them turn you
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

Sounds good--would I accomplish that?

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 

Sorry, meant to say how would I accomplish that.

post #11 of 19

Mountainbum,

 

Welcome to Epic and bravo for posting video for MA!

 

What I see first is an exceptional ability to turn the skis, stay in the fall line and control speed despite some challenging conditions and slope pitch. There's no "need" to get any better than this, but if you want to raise your performance level, there's plenty of room for that. There are a lot of symptoms here to look at. The stemming that others have observed could be caused by many things, I also see an overly wide stance, a fair amount of A framing, and lots of unequal edge angles. It's difficult to say for sure from these clips what the cause of all of these is, but  before we look too far, the first thing to do is to verify that misalignment is not the cause. Have you ever had your alignment checked by a bootfitter?

 

The best way to get the skis to turn you is to get both edges of the skis working together. If you can't get both skis to ride on the same (as each other) edge angle all the time, you're going to get differing levels of performance out of each ski and the job of making the skis working in harmony is going to be much much harder.

 

Here are some still shots from the clips. I don't have time tonight to document my thoughts on each shot, but maybe others can comment for now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

Everything that you said was spot on...I know that I am very knock-kneed, whenever I try to stand on one ski my left ski immediately tips over without any encouragement. My right one does too, but not as much--one ski skiing is very difficult for me.

post #13 of 19

If you are very knock kneed and have not had any boot alignment work, you should not bother trying to change your skiing until you've invested in alignment.

post #14 of 19

Nice flow, smooth turning and good rhythm. You also seem to be able to ski some very challenging terrain without any hesitation or fear. Nice.

 

You have been told to work on your tipping. That is not something I would focus on in your case. Tipping would increase your edge angles. Why? Tipping is good for skiers that either carve edge locked or have the ability to turn parallel without a stem and need higher edge angles for better performance or to be quick in short turns. I would definitely work on pressure control and unweighting to initiate turns because now you are very static and don't move up and down with your upper body at all and lack leg flexing and extension.

 

In the second video it is obvious. You are prolonging your skidding at the end of the turn until you start a new turn. This is because you need momentum for your next turn. So you are washing out at the end of the turn waiting for an edge set. What you should do is turn more even with a smaller brush and at the end just continue in a traverse across the hill. Then you up-unweight the next turn initiation by a small extension so that you can offset the tails for your new turn. You should also start using more angulation and upper body counter early on in the turn to get your hips out from over your skis. To the side. Now you are resorting to hip-rotation to initiate.

 

In the first video you are using bumps to up-unweight your turn initiations and it works well. Try to incorporate that into your regular skiing.

 

I don't know about the alignment. To me it looks like your skis are not the most suitable for technical skiing. Lots of float but little edge performance.

 

T

post #15 of 19

First, you ski in a very free way, which I appreciate. You're mobile and managing the terrain really well. It looks like you're having fun, so that's great!

 

I almost dove into MA, and then noticed from those TheRusty screenshots that you almost certainly have alignment issues. These should definitely be addressed before doing any technical changes to your skiing since many things might suddenly come together when your alignment is fixed.

 

All that said, I'm going to dive into MA anyway because it might help. 

It appears that you're getting balanced on the outside ski pretty late in the turn. It's common for instructors to tell learners to dive into the turn or push away from the outside ski into the turn.. The problem with tipping your chest into the turn, or pushing into the turn, is that by doing so you move away from the outside ski, so you give up your pressure on the ski, which means you lose the ability to steer or carve. At the bottom half of the turn, you're going "uhoh, I'm not turning!" so you try to force some edging by pushing your knee inside. While doing so gets you some edge grip, it's strenuous on your knee joints and bad for you in the long term.

 

Skiing is tricky because people want to turn - but thinking "turn!" makes people push themselves to the inside, rotate, and interfere with their skiing. Instead of turning, your job is to manage pressure, let load build on the ski, and manage your balance and the tipping process. Instead of twisting to reach an edge, your job is to let your entire inside half pull upward - the inside leg shortens which makes you tip on edge. You move your mass with your skis, instead of away from your skis. Your outside foot's heel should always feel glued to the snow. 

 

But if you have alignment issues, all of this may be moot. 

 

Also, think of your hip as part of your upper body. Right now your hips are turning a lot, and you're separating through your spine, which puts a lot of stress on your spine. 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 3/27/16 at 7:12pm
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


It appears that you're getting balanced on the outside ski pretty late in the turn. I think this is a PSIA problem these days ....

BTW - this is NOT a PSIA problem. Balancing against the outside ski is so important it is one of the new fundamentals in the new manual. It's always been a core tenet of the PSIA skills, but it was buried between balance and pressure and quite a few instructors "missed the memo". Now there is no excuse. There are still some who argue about "early weight transfer" (i.e. creating more weight on the new outside foot before turning forces naturally transfer weight to that foot). Although I personally teach it a lot, I believe that this is simply a personal and tactical choice. I ski that way when I'm carving groomers and generally don't when I'm in moguls or deep powder. But either way I still balance against the outside foot though the whole turn.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

BTW - this is NOT a PSIA problem. Balancing against the outside ski is so important it is one of the new fundamentals in the new manual. It's always been a core tenet of the PSIA skills, but it was buried between balance and pressure and quite a few instructors "missed the memo". Now there is no excuse. There are still some who argue about "early weight transfer" (i.e. creating more weight on the new outside foot before turning forces naturally transfer weight to that foot). Although I personally teach it a lot, I believe that this is simply a personal and tactical choice. I ski that way when I'm carving groomers and generally don't when I'm in moguls or deep powder. But either way I still balance against the outside foot though the whole turn.

 

 

OK, thank you for clarifying. I'm going to edit my original post to remove that statement since it's not fair to PSIA. It's disappointing that some instructors interpret balancing against the outside ski to mean pushing away from the ski or diving into the turn. 

post #18 of 19

Which is why there are nothing "wrong" with the old manuals and approach. You can lead a horse to water ....

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

 

You have been told to work on your tipping. That is not something I would focus on in your case. Tipping would increase your edge angles. Why? Tipping is good for skiers that either carve edge locked or have the ability to turn parallel without a stem and need higher edge angles for better performance or to be quick in short turns. I would definitely work on pressure control and unweighting to initiate turns because now you are very static and don't move up and down with your upper body at all and lack leg flexing and extension.

 

Tipping the skis properly is not just for "high edge angle highly carved turning", it's for any edge angle turns...tipping his skis properly will allow him to reach those edge angles in balance and full control, as well as kill the stem and A-framing (whatever's left after alignment).

 

Always start with the skis and the feet... and only then move up. And, since we need to put the skis on edge and transfer weight to do any kind of turning, that's the right place to start.

 

cheers.

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