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Which resort has the easiest greens? [A Beginner Zone question] - Page 2

post #31 of 55

Perhaps people who are reading this thread would also be interested in which places to avoid.

 

So I created this thread ... http://www.epicski.com/t/146475/which-resorts-are-the-least-awesome-for-beginners

post #32 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
 

 

 

Welcome to Epic, there are a lot of us here who don't have to travel as far as you for snow.  Glad you are enjoying yourself.  All the areas mentioned are good but let me put another factor into the equation.

 

Good, long beginner runs that are not crowded.  Here in the PNW probably the best beginner area is at Schweitzer, own chair, never crowded, pretty long and a great place to learn your stuff.

2nd in the PNW is Lookout Mt. you can go to top and ski the backside or frontswide on a 100% beginner run.

 

You could fly into Spokane and go from there.  I know you probably won't but thats the way it is in skiville. Spend a minute on the web, chech the prices etc. and I guarantee you will get a lot more quality skiing in that some crowded $10.00 hamburger joint.

 

And if you do come let me know, ask questions and I will be happy to show you the hill.

I've wondered about Schweitzer myself.  How late does the season last?  Also, how is the snow/grooming, etc.

post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by neustkg View Post
 

I've wondered about Schweitzer myself.  How late does the season last?  Also, how is the snow/grooming, etc.

They close up after Eastrer or Spring Break.  Good to Excell grooming.

post #34 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 

Welcome to EpicSki.

Interestingly, it's kind of hard for advanced skiers to answer this question.  Especially skiers who have been skilled for a long time.  We just don't see a slope the same way someone from your perspective might.  All green circle runs seem easy, even though some mix in blue pitches we tend to overlook. . . .   Supposed to be a lot at Big Sky too, but I've never been.

True point!

 

I've skied Big Sky a fair amount, and would agree it's got a very good progression of greens from the base area.  Flat area with magic carpet for true beginners.  Another one with a bit more pitch just up the hill, and then a couple of long groomed greens, which are flat with a couple of slightly steeper, but very short pitches as you work up.  Once you're past that there are greens elsewhere on the mountain that step it up a bit more.

 

The one shortcoming IMO is Andesite Mountain, which has some really nice long greens on the back side (from the main base) off the southern comfort lift, but the only way back to the main base is either a rather steep green (that arguably could be blue) or a cat track. 

post #35 of 55

In Colorado, my vote for easiest green terrain has to go to Breckenridge. Most of the lower mountain consists of massive green runs about as wide as a football field with a very consistent, mellow pitch. Good if you're looking for the easiest possible terrain, but I can see it getting old, even for a true beginner. 

 

In terms of extent and quality of easily accessible green terrain (e.g. easy to find without catwalking all over the place), I'd give it to Copper, followed by Keystone. 

post #36 of 55
Beaver Mt. has some of the best beginner terrain in UT.

http://www.skithebeav.com/c/mountain/trail-map
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Beaver Mt. has some of the best beginner terrain in UT.

http://www.skithebeav.com/c/mountain/trail-map


What lodging is near Beaver?  The OP is a traveler from FL who is looking for places to go for family ski vacations.

post #38 of 55
The beaver creek lodge is across the street from the base. You could also look at vrbo for garden city, ut. Other lodging would be available in Logan ut which is about 30 miles away.

http://www.beavercreeklodge.com/
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

The beaver creek lodge is across the street from the base. You could also look at vrbo for garden city, ut. Other lodging would be available in Logan ut which is about 30 miles away.

http://www.beavercreeklodge.com/


Beaver Creek Lodge looks like a good place for getting together an extended family for a few days.  Some family members might like the idea that snowmobiling is required for a winter reservation made well in advance.

 

"Because we specialize in snowmobile packages, room reservations from December 1 - March 31 must include snowmobile rentals, unless the reservation is made within 30 days of the arrival date."

post #40 of 55

Looks like the OP has disappeared.

post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Looks like the OP has disappeared.


My guess is that there are other beginners and parents with the same question who may be interested.  If not now, in the fall when more people will start planning family ski trips.

post #42 of 55

Well, of course, that's true.  

post #43 of 55
Just to be clear, I would recommend staying in Logan.
post #44 of 55

Just going to second some of the above opinions re: areas I am familiar with.  In the Northeast Bretton Woods and Okemo are good places for beginners.  Mid-Atlantic:  Jack Frost, Big Boulder (not open weekdays, only night skiing during the week) and Bear Creek - all in PA.

 

Colorado:  Beaver Creek has a great learners area and you can now ride down from there so you don't need to take the Cinch cat track (it can be a real chore), Schoolmarm and another one the name of which escapes me at Keystone are great runs (my wife loves them), and Breck (but can be crowded as mentioned).  Keystone also has some long and fun blue rollers for when you want to try upping your game a bit.

 

Salt Lake City area:  both Park City and Canyons (now just Park City) have plenty of reasonably gentle greens.

 

Just thought I'd mention that beginners often "cease to stand up" rather than "fall" when intimidation hits.  As you go, just gently try to stretch your comfort zone a bit and keep standing a bit longer than you want to ;) (I was also a later in life beginner so am familiar with your issue on a personal level and work a lot with a family member who is a trained instructor and loves to introduce people to skiing - which is where the realization about "ceasing to stand up" rather than "falling" came from).

post #45 of 55

Happened to come across a blog entry written by an advanced beginner who spent a few days at Solitude and Deer Valley this season.  The focus of the blog is on food, not outdoor activities.  From the write up, pretty clear that the change in ownership has upped the level of food available at Solitude.  In any case, she had good things to say about lodging at both places and both ski schools.  Definitely enjoyed the day skiing greens and easy blues at Deer Valley.

 

http://www.wellplated.com/travel-to-deer-valley-solitude-mountain-resort-utah/

post #46 of 55

Another story of a beginner at Deer Valley.  The wife is a blogger for Deer Valley and wrote a couple of articles about his experience in a lesson.  The couple moved to Park City a few years ago.  The husband started learning to ski . . . at age 65 . . . in 2013.  He has a granddaughter he wanted to ski with, who was three at the time.

 

http://blog.deervalley.com/?p=4170 - March 2013

http://blog.deervalley.com/?p=9225 - Jan 2016

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

How would you compare Copper greens to the greens at Buttermilk?

 

Very comparable.  Copper Mountain is a very underrated mountain, in my opinion as it gets lumped into the "Summit County, Colorado" circus but usually doesn't have near the crowds that you will find at Keystone and Breckenridge.  The greens at Copper are VERY easy and is a very good choice for beginners wanting to experience a big mountain with lots of terrain options.  Copper vs. Buttermilk by itself...I'd vote Copper.

 

If the OP is still around (@mfleck34222 ), can you tell me what you liked/disliked about Jackson Hole and Steamboat?  I am very familiar with the green runs at both of those spots and would have a better idea of what I would recommend if you could tell me how you felt about those resorts.  Typically, I don't recommend Jackson Hole because all of the green runs are (1) on one lift, (2) pretty much the same, and (3) are TOO easy (in my opinion)  Steamboat isn't much better, but does have a few green catwalks/traverses on the mountain.

 

I'm only familiar with the big spots out West, but would be happy to offer some suggestions based upon how you enjoyed Jackson Hole and Steamboat.


Edited by Lofcaudio - 12/12/16 at 12:58pm
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfleck34222 View Post

I've had 5 ski trips and I've had lessons each time (jackson hole, jay peak vt, snowshoe wv, steam boat, mont tremblant). I can mostly ski parallel but if the slope gets intimidating to me, I fall. I'm not really getting any better. I'm an older woman and would just like to ski some gentle slopes. Which resorts have the easiest greens?


If you flew up to Montreal you would be within an hour/hour and a half drive of quite a few ski resorts that cater to beginners.  Mont Saint Sauveur in the Laurentians is one that comes to mind.  As you probably saw at Tremblant there are a handful of long, winding greens there that are fun to take.  You can also venture out into the Eastern Townships to a mountain like Mont Orford or Bromont.  Added bonus is that as an American your money will go very far here given our weak dollar as of late.

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rookieskier View Post
 
If you flew up to Montreal you would be within an hour/hour and a half drive of quite a few ski resorts that cater to beginners.  Mont Saint Sauveur in the Laurentians is one that comes to mind.  As you probably saw at Tremblant there are a handful of long, winding greens there that are fun to take.  You can also venture out into the Eastern Townships to a mountain like Mont Orford or Bromont.  Added bonus is that as an American your money will go very far here given our weak dollar as of late.

Good thought for beginners who live relatively close to Québec.  Probably makes more sense for people who can drive instead of fly.  For myself, if I fly from the southeast then I go to the Rockies or somewhere on the west coast, not to the northeast.  Even when my daughter was young and only skiing blues out west, there was not much reason to ski in the northeast.  Often colder than out west and smaller mountains that are more crowded during weekends and holidays when kids in school have time for skiing.

 

I've skied once at MSS with a relatively new skier.  She had a good time under the lights.  Learned as an adult but young enough to really like speed.  She liked the day we spent at Tremblant, although it was early season so not much open yet.

 

Note that the OP (Opening Poster) hasn't posted for a while, so probably isn't paying attention to this Beginner Zone thread.  However, I know there are lurkers and future readers who will check out the thread at some point.

post #50 of 55

If it were me, I'd hit Alta on a pow day.  You'll still fall, but you'll have as much fun falling as you do skiing :)  As a bonus you'll come out being able to ski powder, which is a pleasure that many people never get to experience!

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobbly View Post
 

If it were me, I'd hit Alta on a pow day.  You'll still fall, but you'll have as much fun falling as you do skiing :)  As a bonus you'll come out being able to ski powder, which is a pleasure that many people never get to experience!


How long have you been skiing?  How old, over 30?, 40?, 50?

 

While I agree it can be fun for some novices on a powder day, there are also risks.  Especially for older adult beginners.  A friend (over 50) who was learning was at Alta during a big spring storm.  Even on the groomers there was 4-6 inches by the early afternoon.  She was having so much fun, she decided to take the slightly harder route from the top of Sunnyside.  Fell and tweaked a knee.  Luckily it wasn't a blown ACL.

 

That said, I agree there is nothing like skiing fresh power, even as an intermediate.  I had one powder run at Alta on Ballroom long ago (straight skis), with a friend and her instructor.  Never forgot the experience.  Even though I didn't ski at all for a decade after middle school and very little as a working adult.  I always wanted to get back to Alta for a powder day.  Have been lucky a few times in the last decade.  Great fun at any ability level!

post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobbly View Post
 

If it were me, I'd hit Alta on a pow day.  You'll still fall, but you'll have as much fun falling as you do skiing :)  As a bonus you'll come out being able to ski powder, which is a pleasure that many people never get to experience!


How long have you been skiing?  How old, over 30?, 40?, 50?

 

While I agree it can be fun for some novices on a powder day, there are also risks.  Especially for older adult beginners.  A friend (over 50) who was learning was at Alta during a big spring storm.  Even on the groomers there was 4-6 inches by the early afternoon.  She was having so much fun, she decided to take the slightly harder route from the top of Sunnyside.  Fell and tweaked a knee.  Luckily it wasn't a blown ACL.

 

That said, I agree there is nothing like skiing fresh power, even as an intermediate.  I had one powder run at Alta on Ballroom long ago (straight skis), with a friend and her instructor.  Never forgot the experience.  Even though I didn't ski at all for a decade after middle school and very little as a working adult.  I always wanted to get back to Alta for a powder day.  Have been lucky a few times in the last decade.  Great fun at any ability level!

 

Well, yeah, you can injure yourself as you get up off a sofa, let alone getting overconfident on the slopes, but given the choice between falling on a groomer and falling in deep powder, I'll take the deep powder any day.

I've been skiing since I was rather young, and I'm about to turn 40, but I know several folks in their 50's that say the same thing about falling in powder.  My dad, in his 60's, said on more than one occasion that falling in deep powder was a secret treat.

post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

There are a couple runs at Sun Peaks (BC) that are the most fun I've ever had on a green run, but there aren't sections of SP that are predominantly green.
As I understand it, the design of SP allows mixed ability groups to take different runs off the one lift and meet up again at the lift base. They have gone to some lengths to build runs to suit all abilities off the sunny side and Morrisey chairs. So even sticking to the greens, you get to see a lot of the resort.

I also understand that the progession on to blues is eased by a good range of easy blues. Not speaking from personal experience yet. I'll be able to give a good description in about a month. My upcoming trip to SP is not so much a holiday as a mission to improve my skiing.
post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty McSly View Post


I also understand that the progession on to blues is eased by a good range of easy blues.

 

Having done a lot of skiing with beginners over the years, this one thing is perhaps the most important aspect of a good resort for beginners.  Easy beginner runs are fine, but most people need to quickly move beyond the bunny slope and actually ski on terrain that forces (and allows) them to rely on turns to control their speed and movement.  So when recommending resorts for beginners, I am mainly looking for those places that have a seamless transition to the next hardest run.  Challenging greens and easy blues are the sweet spot and should be what every beginner hopes to be able to get to on their first trip out West.

 

Jackson Hole and Snowbird have no easy blues.  Alta has easy green runs, but their blues are a bit of a jump to the next level.  Sun Valley (Bald Mountain) really has no good beginner runs as their greens are steeper than a lot of resort's blues.  If you're at Sun Valley and it's your first time, I would recommend starting at their other location: Dollar Mountain.

 

Places I've been to with great transition from easy greens to more challenging greens to easy blues:

 

Telluride

Copper Mountain

Taos

Grand Targhee

Buttermilk

Snowmass

Aspen Highlands

Beaver Creek

 

(There are a few places that meet the criteria mentioned above, but I would not recommend due to mountain layout and crowds such as Winter Park, Breckenridge, Keystone, and Vail.)

post #55 of 55

My son and I (6 and 49 at the time) hit Keystone and Snowmass last year. We're both new snowboarders (I used to ski, but we live in Minnesota and I got bored). We had been out about 8 times in Minnesota before the trip. Keystone didn't work out (I was too optimistic about the logistics of skiing the first day we flew into CO), but we got a few runs in on their LONG LONG greens. It was fun, but crowded. Snowmass was amazing for us. Due much to what the above poster said about transitions from greens to blues. By the end of the day we were going to the top and riding down their very nice blues.

 

Sadly, I don't think a western trip is in the cards for us this year. We'll check out Lutsen and see how it rates for us beginners.

 

P.S. It's a fascinating case study in development when someone my age and someone my son's age start to learn something like this at the exact same time.

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