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Freeride vs All Mountain Skis

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I grew up skiing as a kid and teenager in BC.  During school, I was reduced to skiing just a couple times a year.  I've recently got back into skiing more seriously.  I picked up all new gear last fall and skied about 20 days this year; mostly at Big White and Whistler.  I bought some Rossignol Super 7s with Marker F10 bindings.  I wanted a slack country setup and I found this stuff on sale.  I've used these skis in all conditions ranging from hard pack groomers to powder days with 40+ cm of fresh snow.

 

Overall, I really like the Super 7s.  I find them to be very easy to ski on.  Sure, they don't hold an edge on groomers that well but they're very predictable.  I also like being able to slide through stuff.  I find the skiing style on these skis to be very forgiving.  I'm not a great skier technically but I've gone down all the double black bowls and chutes surrounding the Blackcomb Glacier with no issues on these skis.

 

I recently demoed a pair of Rossignol Experience 88s and I could not ski on these to save my life.  I was catching an edge and falling over constantly.  I felt like I was fighting them the entire time.

 

I'm guessing this is mainly a difference in the style of skiing required.  Do all mountain skis require a different ski style compared to wider, freeride skis?

post #2 of 7

yes and no.

The skiing should be the same, assuming you're properly skiing on them.

There will be more camber and so when you turn you must properly initiate the turn, and won't allow you to just slarve or skid a turn as easily.

 

An analogy is like your super7s were you were driving a big offroad truck with big offroad tires and the way you've been skiing has always been you just plow over everything and if you turn badly the tires just skid and slide out and you keep going.  

Then the e88s are like a station wagon, without offroad tires, but say all season tires, so when you turn the tires are turning the way you pointed them, and aren't skidding out.

post #3 of 7

Something else to think about:

Perhaps the Super 7s had the edges at tips and tails (perhaps even all the rockered area) de-tuned while the 88s may not (probably should not) have any portion of the edges de-tuned.  Thus you may be experiencing "tripping" over the edges.

Sounds like you tune your own skis so you may have already checked this.

And just FYI, last weekend we had a local spring demo day which included (for me) both soul 7s and Experience 88 among the 15 or so skis demoed.  Didn't really experience the issue your having.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys.  It's probably just a lack of technique.  I like the analogy that raytseng used.  I think the Super 7s are just allowing me to be a lazy skier with sloppy technique.

post #5 of 7
I'd suggest demoing a pair of good skis about 80mm underfoot and taking a lesson from a level 3 instructor, someone who is good at analyzing how people ski and what they're doing wrong. That will tell you where your technique needs to improve.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I'd suggest demoing a pair of good skis about 80mm underfoot and taking a lesson from a level 3 instructor, someone who is good at analyzing how people ski and what they're doing wrong. That will tell you where your technique needs to improve.

Also be sure that those skis are cambered skis, and have little to no rocker if the goal is to relearn your frontside carved turns.   In other words pretty much all 80mm as mtcyclist said,  but a few exceptions such as the Volkl RTM which is full rocker and where you might fall back to your old techniques.

 

NOTE: you don't need to do this, you can also take the perspective that, this is how i ski and I have fun skiing this way and buy skis that are easy to release the edges and match best to your current techniques.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmrocks View Post
 

Thanks guys.  It's probably just a lack of technique.  I like the analogy that raytseng used.  I think the Super 7s are just allowing me to be a lazy skier with sloppy technique.


Very possible. Two or three seasons ago I was skiing fresh snow nearly every day and so was on my Icelantic Nomads every day. Tip and tail rocker and similar widths to the Super7. I would throw them sideways and slide around all over the place - and had an absolute blast doing it. The next season we were back to a more normal snowfall profile so I was skiing several day old snow more often, and was using my E88s as my DD instead of the Nomads. Well, I quickly realized how sloppy I had let myself become. I kept catching my tails and high siding because I wasn't finishing my turns cleanly. So...

 

"Do all mountain skis require a different ski style compared to wider, freeride skis?" I'd say not really, but Freerides ALLOW a different style that All Mountains don't allow. Sounds like you already know you have some things you can learn, I'd go learn those things then go out and have that much more fun.

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