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Beginner skis [northeast, learning at Smuggs]

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Been skiing 6 times and wanted to stop throwing away money renting and looking for a good beginner ski that can see my into intermediacy.

 

Just finished a level 5 ski lesson this past time and im finally parallel skiing and not making such wide carves. I still resort to a snowplough/stem turn when I'm trying to slow down quickly like if someone has fallen in front of me I will make a snowplough to slow down enough that I can make a hockey stop.

 

Just starting to break out of the "gotta go slow" mentality and stepping into a "gotta go fast enough to make clean turns" mentality.

 

5' 10"

210lbs

29 years old

Not sure my skier type. I'd say a  Level II. Not aggressive, but not pizza'ing down the slope anymore.

Ski groomed terrain but would like a wider all purpose ski in case I want to venture off the trails once I develop skills more

 

From my research I'd want a ski no wider than 90-100mm and 170-180cm in length with a binding DIM max of 12.

 

I was looking at the Atomic Nomad Smoke Ti w/ XTO 12 bindings at 171cm (biggest ski I've used so far is 165cm) $480 shipped

 

Looking to be around 500 for binding and ski.

post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbenson87 View Post
 

Been skiing 6 times and wanted to stop throwing away money renting and looking for a good beginner ski that can see my into intermediacy.

 

Just finished a level 5 ski lesson this past time and im finally parallel skiing and not making such wide carves. I still resort to a snowplough/stem turn when I'm trying to slow down quickly like if someone has fallen in front of me I will make a snowplough to slow down enough that I can make a hockey stop.

 

Just starting to break out of the "gotta go slow" mentality and stepping into a "gotta go fast enough to make clean turns" mentality.

 

5' 10"

210lbs

29 years old

Not sure my skier type. I'd say a  Level II. Not aggressive, but not pizza'ing down the slope anymore.

Ski groomed terrain but would like a wider all purpose ski in case I want to venture off the trails once I develop skills more

 

From my research I'd want a ski no wider than 90-100mm and 170-180cm in length with a binding DIM max of 12.

 

I was looking at the Atomic Nomad Smoke Ti w/ XTO 12 bindings at 171cm (biggest ski I've used so far is 165cm) $480 shipped

 

Looking to be around 500 for binding and ski.


Welcome to EpicSki!  Please take a look at the First Run Articles related to buying gear.  A couple of the most important ones are also listed at the top of Ski Gear.  

 

Skier Type (I, II, III) is related to how the DIN is set on bindings.  Doesn't really have anything to do with what skis are appropriate.  What is more helpful is that you noted you were taking a Level 5 lesson, although not every ski school uses the same method for ranking students.  The most common ranking is based on 9 levels, from Never Ever at Level 1 and Expert at Level 9.

 

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Northeast, Vermont, Maine, New Hampsire. Only been to Smuggler's Notch.

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry)?  Groomed runs

  3. How many days a year do you ski? 3 days, would ski more if I had own skis

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? Level 5. Roller blade and ice skate so im learning quickly

  5. What's your height and weight?  70"  210lbs

post #4 of 9

What you need to buy first, before you spend money on skis, is boots.  Read the article about ski boots being the most important gear you will buy.  Then go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology.  Finally, check the "Who's Who" to see if there is a boot fitter near you who's active on Epic.  If there isn't one listed, ask and someone will be able to recommend a boot fitter.  This is NOT something you can do on your own, you need the help of a knowledgeable and experienced fitter.  Get boots and then we can talk about skis.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
I live in Rhode Island. Closest guy from the list on this site is in Boston.

There is a ski shop near my house that people love but I wont give them my business after having rented gear from them on my recent trip and having a lot of it setup incorrectly and some of it breaking entirely.

The punk we dealt with in the beginning it almost felt like we were sabotaged.

I had planned on getting boots first, but wanted skis as well. Figured no one here could help me with boots so I asked about skis.

Its like golf clubs...there isnjust so many brands and styles of brands. Its dizzying
post #6 of 9

Rhode Island is pretty small, can't be that far to Boston.

post #7 of 9

You title this "Beginner skis," but claim to be an intermediate. Your lesson history seconds that; in any case no one wants to buy beginners skis; you rent beginners skis. Also pay attention to the last few posts about boots. Better to spend your 5 Benjamins on decent boots on sale and rent for another year.

 

As far as your choice: The Smoke is a nice ski, perhaps a touch soft for someone your size, but it works and a good price. If you can cough up the 5 past your boots, I'd also think about the Blizzard X-Power 7 Ti, Fischer Progressor F18,  Head Rally. Latter will be tough to find for <500, but you could get close if you pay attention in the next couple of months. The first will be tough to find, the Power S8 would work too. You could find happiness on a Blizzard Latigo, more all mountain and better in the bumps, but again, tough to find <500. Should be Progressor's around but the F18 is less common; the F19 is a great ski that will be reasonably priced but a bit much for you. 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbenson87 View Post

I live in Rhode Island. Closest guy from the list on this site is in Boston.

There is a ski shop near my house that people love but I wont give them my business after having rented gear from them on my recent trip and having a lot of it setup incorrectly and some of it breaking entirely.

The punk we dealt with in the beginning it almost felt like we were sabotaged.

I had planned on getting boots first, but wanted skis as well. Figured no one here could help me with boots so I asked about skis.

Its like golf clubs...there isnjust so many brands and styles of brands. Its dizzying


The other choice for finding a good boot fitter is to plan on working with one who is near where you expect to ski several times in the near future.  Note that there are skiers who think it's well worth spending half a day to invest in good boots, or even a day if the nearest good shop is a couple hours away.

post #9 of 9

Another good reason to get boots and rent skis a while longer is that at your size you really need skis closer to 180cm.  I'm 5'7", 150 pounds and my skis range from 160cm(SL race ski) to 184cm(fat powder ski).  The skis I most commonly use are 170 and 177.  If you bought the Atomics or just about any other ski at about 170cm, you will outgrow it by the end of next season.

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