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Used Gear Advice

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
So I'm graduating this December, and my plan is to move out west to one of the resorts and immerse myself in the ski bum culture. I've been skiing a few times, and I have a longing for it that will only be satisfied by moving out there and just doing it. That being said, I'd consider myself an intermediate or advanced-intermediate skier and need some gear. I'd prefer twin tip skis because I like doing freestyle stuff and skiing backwards, does anyone have some suggestions as to what USED gear to look at, and maybe some sites to check out? Height 5'7 weight 150. Please help a brother out.
post #2 of 16
You've got housing and employment covered, I hope? Because used equipment will be easily available wherever you go. Those things won't be.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

You've got housing and employment covered, I hope? Because used equipment will be easily available wherever you go. Those things won't be.
Not quite yet. I'm starting my plan now. I want to go out there this summer to scope everything out and do some interviews. I have server experience so I doubt it will be a problem to work at a restaurant. As far as housing, I will start looking now. Thank you for the advice.
post #4 of 16

Ski swaps rule for used stuff, in my experience. Our local city hill has one every fall and there are masses of gear, with some very good buys. I got two pairs of boots and three pairs of skis there last fall.

 

For new, Asogear on Ebay has been very good for me as I don't mind non-current stuff. Can be the same price as used.

post #5 of 16
The problem here is housing is just not available, almost at any price. Rentals are for short term vacationers, and long term rentals are either very high or consist of that "very high" being shared by many. This problem gets reduced by driving further, but it's still an issue. Lack of affordable housing is a constant issue, as people don't want large multi unit buildings going in next door to them, or trailer parks, etc. This ski area doesn't provide housing, although some do. But they only provide it to their employees, not the employees of other businesses.

(Just checked, there's ONE rental available for $925/month. Lots at $2000/month. After that, you're driving at least 30 minutes to get down to $850.)
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The problem here is housing is just not available, almost at any price. Rentals are for short term vacationers, and long term rentals are either very high or consist of that "very high" being shared by many. This problem gets reduced by driving further, but it's still an issue. Lack of affordable housing is a constant issue, as people don't want large multi unit buildings going in next door to them, or trailer parks, etc. This ski area doesn't provide housing, although some do. But they only provide it to their employees, not the employees of other businesses.

Would you suggest keeping up with craigslist to find a place where i can live with roommates? or trying to find a resort with employee housing?

post #7 of 16
You'll have more choices in employment if you go the Craigslist route. You want more choices, as you want to be able to ski. And most resort jobs line up that you're working while people area skiing.
post #8 of 16

Re the housing issue around Tahoe http://www.moonshineink.com/news/housing-crisis-out-reach

The upside of the housing situation is that poorly paying (ie ski/tourism related) jobs are going begging for lack of people who can pay the rent

http://www.moonshineink.com/news/where-have-all-employees-gone-0

post #9 of 16
Basically, it sounds like first worry about housing, then about the job, and finally about the skis.
http://flatheadbeacon.com/2016/03/02/the-affordability-gap/
Quote:
some local restaurants were forced to close down certain nights of the week last summer because they could not staff their businesses.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigmeech View Post


Not quite yet. I'm starting my plan now. I want to go out there this summer to scope everything out and do some interviews. I have server experience so I doubt it will be a problem to work at a restaurant. As far as housing, I will start looking now. Thank you for the advice.

 

Except that those jobs are highly competitive. You not only have all the people who want to do what your doing but also all the local teens who don't have to make a living wage from the job and therefore are willing to work for less. Not to mention dinner sever jobs are what everyone wants so that it doesn't conflict with their skiing. I would not assume that you will be able to easily find a job that will allow you to both make a living wage AND not conflict with skiing.

 

As others have said used gear will be abundant in the area focus on housing and employment first. Don't be surprised if you not only have to have housemates but actually share a room as well. Not uncommon to see six people staying in a two bedroom place...      

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post

 

Except that those jobs are highly competitive. You not only have all the people who want to do what your doing but also all the local teens who don't have to make a living wage from the job and therefore are willing to work for less. Not to mention dinner sever jobs are what everyone wants so that it doesn't conflict with their skiing. I would not assume that you will be able to easily find a job that will allow you to both make a living wage AND not conflict with skiing.

^^^^^^^^^This

post #12 of 16

Just to add another possibility to the mix - many foreigners (Aussies, New Zealanders, Americans etc..) apply for temporary foreign worker permits for Canada and come and work in Banff. Because of the lack of development allowed in the National Parks, many of the employers in the park (in either Banff or Lake Louise) provide their employees with 'transition' housing until more housing becomes free. A lot of this is dorm-style housing with communal kitchens, but I hear its not that bad. Some of the hotels and resorts even have their own employee housing. Additionally, many of the hostels will hire people and exchange work for housing.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by albertanskigirl View Post
 

Additionally, many of the hostels will hire people and exchange work for housing.

 

Heh, that was me back in the day. Never worked so hard (dishwasher) for so little money. Always proud though that I wanted to have a ski bum winter and went out and did it. No regrets.

 

To the OP, swaps are usually in the fall, when people are thinking of gearing up and go through the gear they have stored away.

post #14 of 16

If I were you  I would look hard at Salt Lake City for accommodation and a job. Get a season pass to one or all of the Cottonwood Canyon resorts and ride the bus to the resort from SLC. 

 

For used ski gear you will not do better than visit the Ski Truck http://www.skitrucks.com/ amazing warehouse sort of place with thousands of used boots and skis. My boots needed a part and I bought a matching used pair for $30

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
 

If I were you  I would look hard at Salt Lake City for accommodation and a job. Get a season pass to one or all of the Cottonwood Canyon resorts and ride the bus to the resort from SLC. 

 

For used ski gear you will not do better than visit the Ski Truck http://www.skitrucks.com/ amazing warehouse sort of place with thousands of used boots and skis. My boots needed a part and I bought a matching used pair for $30

whoa, you can do way better that to give any buisness to ski trucks.  they sell extremely low end used up old rental gear.  avoid them like the plauge.  there are a half dozen swaps in the area in the fall. a great online used gear marketplace(ksl classifieds) and a few high end used gear consignment shops like Second Tracks.  as stated above, worry about your gear last.  

post #16 of 16

I also finished my last quarter of college (back in the early '90s) in December and spent the rest of the season being a ski bum. I went to Salt Lake City and worked as a lift operator at Snowbird. Because of being a resort employee I got a ski pass that also gave me free access to the ski bus service. Housing options were pretty wide in SLC at the time. One of the best decisions I ever made. I worked three days a week and skied three full days a week and took one day off. I also got to ski a lot when I was working because they provided a lot of breaks. Snowbird seemed to really cater to the ski bums at the time. I learned that some resorts treated lift operating like it was a real job and expected you to work all day and others (like Snowbird) treated it is a job for people who wanted to ski/snowboard and gave you lots of breaks to ski.

 

I would think SLC would still be a great place for someone like you because it is a big city and not just a ski town with limited employment and housing.

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