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Too much ski? How do you know? [intermediate but improving, recently moved to Denver]

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I have been demoing some skis for my first pair.  I recently moved to Denver and I've been bitten by the bug.  Before this year, I only skied occasionally, maybe 25 days life time.  I plan on skiing about 20-25 days next season and beyond.  I've recently went through about 5 ski instruction books and several DVDs so my knowledge about what I'm suppose to be trying to do has increased quite a bit.  I have about 5 lessons life time.

 

Age: 42.  Height: 6' 0''.  Weight 190 lbs.  Build: Athletic.  Skill Level : Intermediate but improving. 

I ski mostly groomed, blue and easier blacks.  I still need to learn bumps, deeper powder, and steeps.

 

I demoed Atomic Vantage 95 (178cm) and Pinnacle K2 (177cm) and much preferred the K2s.  They seemed more stable and just held better in roughed up groomers.  Conditions were soft, fresh snow.

 

Even though I know the Bonafide Blizzards are an expert ski, I demoed them last week and really liked them.  I was expecting them to wear me out quickly, but it was probably my best day of skiing ever.   Conditions were much firmer so it's not really a fair comparison.  I'm not sure if I might have more troubled bending these skis in softer conditions.  And I know the K2s would be easier to learn bumps with due to softer flex and tighter turn radius.

 

I've had 3 sales people say the Bones are probably too much ski and 2 tell me they're fine and that I'd probably grow in to them over the next season. 

 

So my question is, how do I know if I'm on too much ski or not?  

What should I look for?

 

I plan on trying the K2s and Bonafides next week on the same day and hopefully in softer conditions.

 

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 12

Probably the main thing is whether you can control the ski.  If you can't control it you won't have fun and that's what it's really about.  Some skis, like race skis, have terrific rebound and if you've never experienced it and don't know how to deal with it, it can throw you out of control instantly.  I never considered myself more than an upper intermediate.  A few years ago I demoed some 168cm Nordica Fire Arrow 84EDTs at Snowbasin and fell in love.  Then I spent two days skiing a pair of 176cm FA84EDTs.  I could ski them but they were a fair amount of work.  I was later told that the ski is really only for experts.  Who, me?  I now own a pair and they are a blast to ski.  The point is that when a company makes a ski and they say it's for advanced to expert skiers, take that with a grain of salt because sometimes the way you ski is more important than who they claim the ski is for.  I've skied the Bonafide and didn't care for it, felt like a 2x4, but I only weigh 150 pounds and the Bonafide is not made for lightweights.  If you're demoing skis in the ~100mm range, try the Nordica Enforcer 100(now called the Enforcer S).  I know quite a few people about your size who love their Enforcers.  Another ski I'd recommend is the Atomic Vantage 100CTi which is stiffer than the Vantage 95 which is probably too soft for your weight.  I've skied it and thought it was a really nice ski.  I personally think you're demoing skis that are a bit short for you.  My son is your height but only about 165 pounds and skis the 185cm Nordica Enforcer.  I'm only 5'7", 150 pounds and the 177cm Enforcer is perfect for me as is the 180cm Vantage 100CTi.

 

But, if a company says a ski is for beginners, believe it.

post #3 of 12

mtcyclist offers good advice.

 

The Pinnacle sounds like an odd ski for someone of your size, especially only at 177cm. I'm 5'7" 130lb, skied the same ski for a day and loved it as well. But I suspect at your size it's going to become too "wimpy" as you become a better skier. Those skis have quite a bit of rocker, so 177cm is definitely too short for you.

 

If you loved the Bonafide, that may be the way to go. Testing them again is a good idea.

post #4 of 12
What length Bonafide did you try?
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the info. 

 

I tried the Bonafides in 180cm length.

I also tried the Atomic Vantage 100 CTIs last week, but forgot to mention in my original post.  They only had them in 173cm, but the sales guy said I should give them a shot.  The conditions were tough as I got caught in a bit of a white out and was skiing ungroomed with no view of the snow.  My crappy low light goggles from 1995 weren't helping either. (Bought some Flight Deck XMs yesterday :)  So basically, I had to ski them pretty defensively and was forced to stick to easier runs near the base where visibility was better.  But my initial impression was that I liked them less than the Bonafides and K2s.  Again, the conditions and the length were giving me a bias.    The float seemed good in the 6-12 inch powder, even in the shorter length.

 

I'll try the NRGY 100s next week.  They were on my list to demo, but I didn't get to them.  I've got 2.5 days at Keystone, so I should have time to try each side-by-side instead of a week or two apart. 

post #6 of 12
That length Bonafide is good for your size. One thing you should try real hard not to do and that is continuing to demo skis after you find one that really rings your bell. When you find a ski like that, it's time to quit demoing and buy. It sounds like the Bonafide is that ski for you.
post #7 of 12
I have 2year old Bonafides and demoed enforcers for 2 hours. I would agree if I didn't have my bones or if I broke them I'd buy the enforcers. a

My impression was they're like the bones when you put them on edge but easier to release and a bit more agile.
Granted i haven't skied the current bones with the carbon doohickeys
The skill level description for all mtn or free-ride skis are a bit misleading because a good chunk of it relates to the terrain you ski in, or aspire to ski in, not necessarily your skill level. The "expert" skis actually are a bit of a crutch to cover up your lack of skills rather then requiring expert skills . If you switch from say the bonafide to skinny skis you realize how lazy and imprecise you've been and how much the all mtn ski is doing for you.

Race skis are a different manner where they are unskiable unless you have the skills to take what they throw at you.
Edited by raytseng - 3/20/16 at 11:56pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

That length Bonafide is good for your size. One thing you should try real hard not to do and that is continuing to demo skis after you find one that really rings your bell. When you find a ski like that, it's time to quit demoing and buy. It sounds like the Bonafide is that ski for you.

This.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

I agree with the over demoing warning.  I decided just to take the plunge rather than spend an extra $85 next week at Keystone.  Bought them yesterday afternoon.

If they turn out to be too stiff, I guess I'll have to learn how to ski fast, fast.

Thanks for the info and push.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by edog12 View Post
 

I agree with the over demoing warning.  I decided just to take the plunge rather than spend an extra $85 next week at Keystone.  Bought them yesterday afternoon.

If they turn out to be too stiff, I guess I'll have to learn how to ski.  fast, fast.

Thanks for the info and push.

 

FIFY. :D

 

Enjoy the new skis.

post #11 of 12

I don't think you'll be disappointed. The bonafides are popular in part because they work for a wide range of skiers. I'm 6' 180 don't ski fast (I'm old) and I don't have any trouble turning or controlling them. Bending them won't be a problem.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I have 2year old Bonafides and demoed enforcers for 2 hours. I would agree if I didn't have my bones or if I broke them I'd buy the enforcers. a

My impression was they're like the bones when you put them on edge but easier to release and a bit more agile.
Granted i haven't skied the current bones with the carbon doohickeys
The skill level description for all mtn or free-ride skis are a bit misleading because a good chunk of it relates to the terrain you ski in, or aspire to ski in, not necessarily your skill level. The "expert" skis actually are a bit of a crutch to cover up your lack of skills rather then requiring expert skills . If you switch from say the bonafide to skinny skis you realize how lazy and imprecise you've been and how much the all mtn ski is doing for you.

Race skis are a different manner where they are unskiable unless you have the skills to take what they throw at you.

That's kind of a strange thing to say. Whether a ski is an expert ski or a beginner ski has little do with width (except that beginners will have trouble handling skis at the widest end of the spectrum) and everything to do with stiffness. Beginner skis are softer because beginners ski slower and therefore don't bend the ski as much. Sure--a wide ski makes skiing deep snow easier. Is that what you mean by crutch? So stiff skinny skis make skiing ice easier--isn't that as much of a crutch. Put a beginner on a stiff "expert" ski--whether it's skinny, all mountain, or powder--and they'll have a hard time--far from being a crutch, the skis will be a stumbling block.


Edited by oldgoat - 3/21/16 at 5:11pm
post #12 of 12
I get what you're saying. And maybe I didn't state my words right to explain. I didn't intend to say skinny skis are beginner skis, so let's just strike that.
Let me just take a second swing at my thought. Just that so called labelling of expert skis has been blurred now and you can't tell when a ski is labelled expert, whether they mean that's the skill required to ski that ski or whether they are calling it expert to sell you on the terrain you aspire to do.
Bonafides although labelled an expert ski dont require expert skills to ski and have fun on them which I think we agree on

Op you will have fun on those and also gain some skills
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