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Cutting through the BS and finding the best boot for me.

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

In the last three seasons, I've gone through an epic journey in search of a boot that feels and performs right for me.  I still haven't found it.  I've spent a lot of money trying to find a boot that will work for me, but still haven't found a good fit.  I've worked with two different boot fitters, both with good reputations, and still haven't been able to get things quite right.

 

I've gone through three different pairs of boots, two pairs of custom footbeds, various shell modifications, shims, and just about every buckle configuration possible.  

 

I've been skiing in a Head Rapter 130RS, which performs quite well, but feels very sloppy on my foot.  There is far more movement than I believe there should be happening inside of my boots.  I've suffered through ankle problems for the majority of this season, which I believe are due to poor fitting boots.  

 

Every time I talk to knowledgeable skiers (instructors, boot fitters, other experienced skiers) they seem to agree that it sounds like my boots are oversized.  What is strange is that both of my boot fitters told me that my shell fit was on the small side, and that they wouldn't put me in anything smaller.  

 

I'm hoping to weed out some of the options in front of me.  I am considering new boots at the start of next season.  I am also considering new liners, perhaps a Zip-Fit.  

 

Can anyone offer some advice on how to approach finding the right fit.  What options really work, and which ones are gimmicks.  

post #2 of 18

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

 

and talking to your boot fitter, and making sure you are BOTH willing to work thru what might be a long process.

 

start at the start of the year, and somewhere that you can try the boot changes out on snow as well helps

post #3 of 18

You don't mention the width of your foot or talk in general about foot volume. Possibly you don't know and unfortunately that may be the situation with your fitters.  Often skiers and shops talk about size as if length is the only thing to consider.

 

You are in a low volume 98mm boot in the Raptor 130 but you complain your foot is still loose.  Assuming you are in the correct length it may mean your foot requires an even lower volume boot.  Before spending money on Zipfit liners I'd find some 95mm boots and try them on.  From Head it would be B2 or B3s, but each manufacturer makes 95mm boots.

 

They will require more careful fitting but may solve your problem.

 

Lou

post #4 of 18
It may also not be the boot. You may have flexable feet/joints that need some attention. It could be a process to dial you..
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post
 

You don't mention the width of your foot or talk in general about foot volume. Possibly you don't know and unfortunately that may be the situation with your fitters.  Often skiers and shops talk about size as if length is the only thing to consider.

 

You are in a low volume 98mm boot in the Raptor 130 but you complain your foot is still loose.  Assuming you are in the correct length it may mean your foot requires an even lower volume boot.  Before spending money on Zipfit liners I'd find some 95mm boots and try them on.  From Head it would be B2 or B3s, but each manufacturer makes 95mm boots.

 

They will require more careful fitting but may solve your problem.

 

Lou

I don't have specific information regarding the width of my foot or the volume.  I have been taking my boot fitter's word on the subject.  We have talked about how different boots work better for different shaped feet, and he has made recommendations for me to try on.  This was how we came to the Head Raptor 130.  I will look into a 95mm boot.  I think this is a good place to start.  

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BurgMan View Post

It may also not be the boot. You may have flexable feet/joints that need some attention. It could be a process to dial you..

Can you elaborate a little bit on having flexible feet/joints, and what kind of attention that would require?  Is this a conditioning issue? How is it normally fixed?

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Part of my original intent of this post was to find out if the various customizable boot technologies on the market are any good.  Many manufacturers are making moldable liners.  Do they really work?  Fischer is doing the whole vacuum fit thing.  Is it just a gimmick, or is it really a better way to custom fit a boot?  Then there are options like SureFoot.  I've heard mixed things on many of these options.  In your experience, are there any of these technologies that just don't work well?  I just want to move past the marketing and work with options that are likely to work.

post #8 of 18

where do you live?   we can suggests a person in that area?

the things you talked about work, but even better is a person that knows what they are doing, that might not have all the toys, but has all the skills.

post #9 of 18

Molding liners can make boots slightly more comfortable, but won't make them feel any smaller.  Fischer technology seems to work well for getting proper cuff alignment and probably a little more.  In my experience shrinking a shell that is too high volume doesn't happen.

 

Lou

post #10 of 18
An experienced boot fitter will assess your feet and range of motion.. Through the assesment process the fitter can determine if you have a limited range of motion or are hypermobile. A well made posted footbed can help.. If your foot is not balanced and stabile correctly inside the ski boot this can affect the overall fit of the ski boot. The forefoots balance affects the rearfoots position.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
 

where do you live?   we can suggests a person in that area?

the things you talked about work, but even better is a person that knows what they are doing, that might not have all the toys, but has all the skills.

I'm in the Catskills in NY, near Hunter Mtn.  

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

I skied Stratton today, and while I was there, I stopped in to see the boot fitter at First Run.  I quickly described the issues I was having, and within about 30 seconds he had my foot in a boot that felt right.  Unfortunately, he didn't have a 130 flex in stock, but it made it very clear that I'm currently in the wrong boot, and gave me a pretty good idea of what boot I'm looking for.  I'm going to see if one of my local boot fitters have it in stock.  Otherwise, I think I'm going to have to take a trip to Stratton in the Fall.  

 

The boot he recommended was the Salomon XPro 130.

post #13 of 18

is the salomon the same size as your current head? if so, i am looking forward to your post next march when you increase the number of years in a row that you have bought the wrong boot from 3 to 4 ;)

 

jim

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeFiter View Post
 

In the last three seasons, I've gone through an epic journey in search of a boot that feels and performs right for me.  I still haven't found it.  I've spent a lot of money trying to find a boot that will work for me, but still haven't found a good fit.  I've worked with two different boot fitters, both with good reputations, and still haven't been able to get things quite right.

 

I've gone through three different pairs of boots, two pairs of custom footbeds, various shell modifications, shims, and just about every buckle configuration possible.  

 

I've been skiing in a Head Rapter 130RS, which performs quite well, but feels very sloppy on my foot.  There is far more movement than I believe there should be happening inside of my boots.  I've suffered through ankle problems for the majority of this season, which I believe are due to poor fitting boots.  

 

Every time I talk to knowledgeable skiers (instructors, boot fitters, other experienced skiers) they seem to agree that it sounds like my boots are oversized.  What is strange is that both of my boot fitters told me that my shell fit was on the small side, and that they wouldn't put me in anything smaller.  

 

I'm hoping to weed out some of the options in front of me.  I am considering new boots at the start of next season.  I am also considering new liners, perhaps a Zip-Fit.  

 

Can anyone offer some advice on how to approach finding the right fit.  What options really work, and which ones are gimmicks.  

Although you mentioned the model boot you are in, you have not mentioned the size of the boot, nor the length/width of your feet.

 

To accurately measure your feet, you will need a piece of paper as large as your feet and a square.   You could use a hard bound book as a square.

 

Place one foot on the paper, place the square behind your heel and mark the spot where it sits on the paper at the back of your heel.  Without moving, place the square at the longest toe mark it there, then do the widest part of both sides of your foot and make a mark at those positions.  Now measure between the length and width marks to get an idea of the size of your foot.

 

If you are using a 98 lasted boot and it is too wide then I agree with Jim, the Salomon X-Pro series will be a bad choice, as it is a 100mm last boot and way roomy in the toe box.

 

Just for info---a 100mm lasted boot will be 100mm wide in a size 26.5 and will expand by 2mm for each shell size increase.

 

Lets get some info please.  Otherwise we are just shooting in the dark.

 

mike

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post
 

is the salomon the same size as your current head? if so, i am looking forward to your post next march when you increase the number of years in a row that you have bought the wrong boot from 3 to 4 ;)

 

jim

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post
 

Although you mentioned the model boot you are in, you have not mentioned the size of the boot, nor the length/width of your feet.

 

To accurately measure your feet, you will need a piece of paper as large as your feet and a square.   You could use a hard bound book as a square.

 

Place one foot on the paper, place the square behind your heel and mark the spot where it sits on the paper at the back of your heel.  Without moving, place the square at the longest toe mark it there, then do the widest part of both sides of your foot and make a mark at those positions.  Now measure between the length and width marks to get an idea of the size of your foot.

 

If you are using a 98 lasted boot and it is too wide then I agree with Jim, the Salomon X-Pro series will be a bad choice, as it is a 100mm last boot and way roomy in the toe box.

 

Just for info---a 100mm lasted boot will be 100mm wide in a size 26.5 and will expand by 2mm for each shell size increase.

 

Lets get some info please.  Otherwise we are just shooting in the dark.

 

mike

 

I was mistaken when I said the Salomon XPro.  I believe it was actually the XMax that I tried on.  I just spoke to one of my local boot fitters and he pointed out the difference.  I made an appointment to look at some options this Friday.  

 

If I have time, I'll try to get some measurements for you later today.

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

I had a few minutes, so I took some quick measurements of my feet.  I traced them on a sheet of paper and then measured Length from heel to toe, Last from the side of the sheet to the farthest point inward, and I measured the Instep from the center of my heel at the floor to the center of the heel on the other side at the floor.  

 

Length

R=27.5

L=27.3

 

Last

R=105

L=100

 

Instep

R=25

L=25

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by TreeFiter View Post
 

I had a few minutes, so I took some quick measurements of my feet.  I traced them on a sheet of paper and then measured Length from heel to toe, Last from the side of the sheet to the farthest point inward, and I measured the Instep from the center of my heel at the floor to the center of the heel on the other side at the floor.  

 

Length

R=27.5

L=27.3

 

Last

R=105

L=100

 

Instep

R=25

L=25

I highlighted the pertinent part of the sentence.

 

Sadly, "tracing" the foot is not a very accurate way to determine the length / width of a human foot.

 

First the lead in a pencil is in the center of its circumference and, did it outline the foot in a perpendicular position all the way around the perimeter correctly.  Of course you would need to then subtract half of the pencil's diameter from the length/width of the foot.:duel:

 

Using a square placed in a standing position at the rear---front and both sides of the widest part of the foot,  will give a more accurate measurement.

 

I am wondering if you were to use a square, would the numbers change significantly?

 

mike 

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post
 

I highlighted the pertinent part of the sentence.

 

Sadly, "tracing" the foot is not a very accurate way to determine the length / width of a human foot.

 

First the lead in a pencil is in the center of its circumference and, did it outline the foot in a perpendicular position all the way around the perimeter correctly.  Of course you would need to then subtract half of the pencil's diameter from the length/width of the foot.:duel:

 

Using a square placed in a standing position at the rear---front and both sides of the widest part of the foot,  will give a more accurate measurement.

 

I am wondering if you were to use a square, would the numbers change significantly?

 

mike 

I certainly had my doubts about the accuracy as I did it, especially when I saw the Last measurement was over 100mm while a 98mm boot is already too big.  There is a reason they invented the Brannock.  I guess I'll have to wait until I meet with my boot fitter on Friday to get some good measurements.  

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