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Designing the best gear out there - you can help - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Are people skiing with climbing gear in Colorado? Thst's what I was thinking of. Common in many places in Europe. I haven't seen much here but haven't really gone looking.

 

Climbing gear isn't super common but certainly crampons and ice axes. Longs peak has a route where people are normally roped and placing ice screws but more due to exposure then actual climbing. Pyramid peak is another that usually has climbing and there are quite a few others though the routes are the less traveled ones. It's also not that uncommon for lines to require a repel to get into. Obviously this is still a very small subset of the general skiing population and even a small subset of back country skiers but there is definitely an audience for the gear in Colorado.   

post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by checksix68 View Post
 

Better quality waterproof zippers.    The plastic zipper teeth get hacked up and stripped fairly easy.  The right pocket zipper on my jacket is stripped.  I think this occurred over the course of many uses where the jacket has a tendency to bunch up while trying to zip up the pocket with one hand.  Perhaps this has to do with the design of the zipper angle, which goes bottom to top to zip.  The angle is maybe 15 degrees diagonal from my hip towards the center of my chest.  On the other hand, maybe it's my fault.  If I secured my powder skirt more often, maybe the jacket wouldn't bunch or ride up as much when I zip up my pockets.  The jacket's main zipper is also showing serious signs of wear also.  I was going to send it back in after ski season to have new zippers put in.  Haven't looked into this yet.  Not sure they do that.        


I'll have to agree with the lower side pocket zippers. both my new jackets, like most all in the past 25+years, takes two hands to zip. I don't think there is any way around it. All my jackets have had powder skirts and I always fasten them.

 

The one thing I don't like about my Volkl insulated jacket is the zipper is backwards. The part that slides up is on the left side. 

 

 

I can also see where when reaching up climbing the cuff is better off inside the glove gauntlet. I do have one pair of gloves with a large over the cuff gauntlet, but haven't worn  them skiing in a few years.  For skiing, the gloves are better inside the cuff. Snow and rain run outside not inside.

post #33 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARL67 View Post

I despise/loathe/hate hoods.  Hmmm, what other evil verbs I can I through in there ? devil.gif
They should all have a removable feature of some sort.
I have not needed a hood while skiing since I got back into skiing 7-8 years ago.

~ Andy

Bart, I couldn't imagine a mountaineering jacket without a hood. It would be nice if it were stowable, but ARL's post clearly defines the difference in needs between a recreational lift accessed ski jacket and true mountaineering wear. No, lift accessed skiing at Jackson Hole etc.., is NOT mountaineering. It's still a relatively controlled environment with quick access out of weather. You need to talk to mountaineers (and mountaineers who use skis), not skiers. Will your cuffs work in gale force winds? Will the hood, and will it fit over most mountaineering/rock helmets currently on the market? You might get better suggestions at a place like 'turns all year'. In the meantime, you're asking coastal sailors to design gear for the southern ocean.
post #34 of 54
Yeah I don't get it either.
post #35 of 54
Maybe Mountain Project forums: https://www.mountainproject.com/forums/
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Maybe Mountain Project forums: https://www.mountainproject.com/forums/

 

Mountain project is mostly rock climbers which is also a very different group. The truth is that true mountaineers are a very small niche group even then the vast majority are doing single day trips and go out in fair weather.   

post #37 of 54
This why I suggested Europe. Just think there's more ski mountaineering. Easier access basically.
But I don't think input is all that important for Bart's project.
This is lift accessed, have coffee in town walk to lift and go up 9,000 ft to skiing. Or trek from there.
http://youtu.be/bipxH48EIUk
post #38 of 54

Hey, some of us sit on the side of Mt Washington in the summer time during a weather event above tree line. My 10+y/o TNF shell will still have water pond in the folds of the jacket. ;)

 

When I look for a ski jacket I look for the features and how well it protects me from the weather. Some of us ski in all kinds of weather events, from -30F plus the wind chill to 31F+ and raining.

 

Tog, you've been on Okemo when its windy, cold, raining, blowing...Hey what's that saying, "it wouldn't be Okemo without the wind".

post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 


I'll have to agree with the lower side pocket zippers. both my new jackets, like most all in the past 25+years, takes two hands to zip. I don't think there is any way around it. All my jackets have had powder skirts and I always fasten them.

 

The one thing I don't like about my Volkl insulated jacket is the zipper is backwards. The part that slides up is on the left side. 

 

 

I can also see where when reaching up climbing the cuff is better off inside the glove gauntlet. I do have one pair of gloves with a large over the cuff gauntlet, but haven't worn  them skiing in a few years.  For skiing, the gloves are better inside the cuff. Snow and rain run outside not inside.

I disagree. When skiing during a storm your hands are out in front of you cutting through the snowfall. A proper glove gauntlet cuff snugs tight around your forearm and keeps snow out even if it is waist deep.:snowfall

post #40 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

I disagree. When skiing during a storm your hands are out in front of you cutting through the snowfall. A proper glove gauntlet cuff snugs tight around your forearm and keeps snow out even if it is waist deep.:snowfall


Yea, I'll have to agree with you, that's why I haven't used my gloves with the big gauntlets for a while, not much powder here in the east. :(

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

Hey, some of us sit on the side of Mt Washington in the summer time during a weather event above tree line. My 10+y/o TNF shell will still have water pond in the folds of the jacket. wink.gif

When I look for a ski jacket I look for the features and how well it protects me from the weather. Some of us ski in all kinds of weather events, from -30F plus the wind chill to 31F+ and raining.

Tog, you've been on Okemo when its windy, cold, raining, blowing...Hey what's that saying, "it wouldn't be Okemo without the wind".

...but chances are very high you don't hang out on Mt.Wa when there's truly ugly weather on tap. There's a ton of great day trip gear out there already.
post #42 of 54

One of the real problems with gear currently is interference between electronics and emergency equipment. 

 

People are carrying phones, cameras, radios, gps, etc. These things cause problems with avalanche beacons. 

 

The best solution I feel is a hip/cargo pocket that allows for easy access to your rescue beacon, while keeping it safely secured so it doesn't fall out during an avalanche. This leaves the chest pockets available for things like cameras and radios. 

 

Also, real radios are big and have long antennas, it's nice to be able to fit them in a chest or shoulder pocket with out having to bend the antenna. 

post #43 of 54

I have pants that are very waterproof, except in the butt.  I never get wet on the front of my legs or the back of my calves, but where I sit on anything the water gets through.  How about putting some kind of old school waterproof coating on the butt and rear upper thigh but using breathable waterproofing on the rest?

 

I also never use hoods and have noticed that it is very hard to find a parka without an unattachable hood.  My last two jackets have had removable hoods and I like that just fine.

post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post
 

One of the real problems with gear currently is interference between electronics and emergency equipment. 

 

People are carrying phones, cameras, radios, gps, etc. These things cause problems with avalanche beacons. 

 

The best solution I feel is a hip/cargo pocket that allows for easy access to your rescue beacon, while keeping it safely secured so it doesn't fall out during an avalanche. This leaves the chest pockets available for things like cameras and radios. 

 

Also, real radios are big and have long antennas, it's nice to be able to fit them in a chest or shoulder pocket with out having to bend the antenna. 


Funny last night I opened the closet and saw my old TNF Mountain Patrol parka, from the late 1990's, It was a 3 layer shell, it had a flap in the chest pocket for the long antenna. That parka had lots of great features, to bad I out grew it. If I lost 10-15lbs I could fit in it...

 

Here's another thing I noticed about my new TNF  http://utahskis.com/the-north-face-fuseform-brigandine-3l-mens-jacket-2015-16.html?utm_source=googlepepla&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=pla&gclid=CMbh9qTUyssCFWJ5cgodxyEPNQ

 

isn't as warm as the 5 y/o 3 layer TNF shell it replaced. I don't recall the name of the older one but it had 3 loose layers not all compacted into one layer. It may be this one, http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2011-2012-the-north-face-enzo-jacket

 

That jacket was fine with my normal base layers even when it was low teens F. The new one is much colder. If it's in the upper teens, I'll switch to the Volkl insulated jacket.

 

So I'm guessing the loose inside layers help retain the heat ?

 

Just trying to give you more idea's and thought's.

post #45 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 


Funny last night I opened the closet and saw my old TNF Mountain Patrol parka, from the late 1990's, It was a 3 layer shell, it had a flap in the chest pocket for the long antenna. That parka had lots of great features, to bad I out grew it. If I lost 10-15lbs I could fit in it...

 

Here's another thing I noticed about my new TNF  http://utahskis.com/the-north-face-fuseform-brigandine-3l-mens-jacket-2015-16.html?utm_source=googlepepla&utm_medium=cpc&utm_content=pla&gclid=CMbh9qTUyssCFWJ5cgodxyEPNQ

 

isn't as warm as the 5 y/o 3 layer TNF shell it replaced. I don't recall the name of the older one but it had 3 loose layers not all compacted into one layer. It may be this one, http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2011-2012-the-north-face-enzo-jacket

 

That jacket was fine with my normal base layers even when it was low teens F. The new one is much colder. If it's in the upper teens, I'll switch to the Volkl insulated jacket.

 

So I'm guessing the loose inside layers help retain the heat ?

 

Just trying to give you more idea's and thought's.

I like this but 3 Layer fabric is there to also interact with skin on warmer weather, so the 3 layer shell has to be in contact with inner body elements in order to react to them and stabilize, Mid layer or base layer or anything else is ok. On the images above there is a 3 layer with lining or some secondary under the 3 Layer fabric (I have not felt the jacket so I am assuming) and yes it can be that way as well but there is no point really, it is better to have 2.5 layer when using insulation as you (the costumer) are just paying for 3rd layer for no reason and blocking it's function really. Not sure...however I love the jackets...

post #46 of 54
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

Thank you all for all the help and advice you have pointed out, all the difficulties and opportunities to better these garments. I am almost done, still some work but you have been all fantastic, I did not expect so much from all of you but what can I say, I love your passion and it feels really amazing being part of this and hearing you all out. I will get all of your forum contacts and keep them on my diary ;) for future references. I can not just yet unfortunately reveal the designs as they have to go through the correct channels but I am hoping that very soon you may see them. I will inform my team that you have all been part of this and that you have been simply fantastic. I would like to thank you all and keep it going, without you there is no us. So respect.

 

Just to let you know: Yes I am dying to share the designs with you :) but soon I hope...

 

Best,

 

Bart

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart Design View Post
 

I like this but 3 Layer fabric is there to also interact with skin on warmer weather, so the 3 layer shell has to be in contact with inner body elements in order to react to them and stabilize, Mid layer or base layer or anything else is ok. On the images above there is a 3 layer with lining or some secondary under the 3 Layer fabric (I have not felt the jacket so I am assuming) and yes it can be that way as well but there is no point really, it is better to have 2.5 layer when using insulation as you (the costumer) are just paying for 3rd layer for no reason and blocking it's function really. Not sure...however I love the jackets...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart Design View Post
 

Hi all,

 

Thank you all for all the help and advice you have pointed out, all the difficulties and opportunities to better these garments. I am almost done, still some work but you have been all fantastic, I did not expect so much from all of you but what can I say, I love your passion and it feels really amazing being part of this and hearing you all out. I will get all of your forum contacts and keep them on my diary ;) for future references. I can not just yet unfortunately reveal the designs as they have to go through the correct channels but I am hoping that very soon you may see them. I will inform my team that you have all been part of this and that you have been simply fantastic. I would like to thank you all and keep it going, without you there is no us. So respect.

 

Just to let you know: Yes I am dying to share the designs with you :) but soon I hope...

 

Best,

 

Bart


I wore the 5 year old TNF jacket to work today, it's the Summit Series, it had the Recco beacon on the right upper arm, that the back pack strap knocked off years ago. That jacket has a lots of nice features.

 

Good luck with your design.

post #48 of 54
Bart Design
Outdoor Winter Sports Clothing has come a long way from plastic garbage bags Ha-Ha!
Couple of people have mentioned zippers, think about using BIG zippers that can be manageable with gloves/mittens in absurd weather. Seems like I usually have to take off my gloves/mittens to work the pocket zippers.
post #49 of 54

One thing I really like about my Flylow jacket is everywhere there used to be velcro or snaps on a jacket is now magnets. That same idea needs to be applied to zippered pockets. Not all of them, but a couple easy access magnet pockets I could get into without taking my mitts off would be so nice. My jackets start at 8 pockets so maybe now I'm just getting greedy..

 

Another cheaper option is the larger rubber rings that osprey uses on their packs for opening pockets with gloves/mitts on.

post #50 of 54
With all the passes and credit cards having magnetized strips etc., the last thing I want is magnets on pockets.
post #51 of 54
So with magnets on pockets how's the rfid pass??

Honestly this is a problem solved long ago. Loop some thin cord through the zipper pull. The problem is manufacurers keep putting in overly fine toothed zippers that require too much pull force.
post #52 of 54

I hang key-ring type rings on my zippers.  They're big enough to open and close with gloves, easy to find, tough, cheap, and make a place to hang a pass/ticket if such is required.  Don't include the fob.

post #53 of 54
Magnets on a backcountry jacket are a bad idea.
They have been found to interfere with avy beacons.
post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post

Magnets on a backcountry jacket are a bad idea.
They have been found to interfere with avy beacons.

 

I guess that makes the Anon goggles with the magnetically attaches lens a no-no as well.

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