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Anybody riding in the Courage Classic in Colorado? - Page 2

post #31 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by northeasterner View Post
 

So I picked up some shoes and pedals last week, but did not get a chance to try them out until yesterday.  Kinda strange but got used to them pretty quickly.  The inevitable fall over because I didn't clip out also happened.  I was at the end of my route where I do laps around a path at a park and saw somebody I knew but didn't really want to stop.  He was engaged talking to someone else and I thought I 'd be able to sneak by but then he turned as I was right there.  At that point I realized I had to stop to say hello and clipped out my right foot and slowed to a stop.  His big galloot dog then jumped in front on the right and I teetered and then fell over on my left side, kinda like Arte Johnson on the tricycle on the old Rowan and Martins Laugh In if you are old enough to remember that.  No damage except to my pride:(

 

I have expanded my after work route to 26 miles and feel pretty good when done.  My lower back tends to get sore at the end of the ride, but is fine when I stop.  I will ride sitting up with no hands on the bars during the ride to stretch it out a bit.  Yesterday I rode 16 miles in the a.m. before it started pouring and I had to cut the ride short.  I then went out and rode my normal 26 mile route in the afternoon for a total of 42 miles.  Not bad.

 

My bike was creaking after the a.m. ride so I put some chain lube on and it was smoother on the 2nd ride.  I was looking on youtube for some DIY things to tune up the bike.  Any simple suggestions for someone that is not very mechanically inclined?

 

I was also wondering in the difference in effort expended going from an old hybrid to a road bike.  I think it is a bit easier, but not sure how much. 

 

For the metric century ride next month I was going to try to rent a road bike to get used to riding one.  Not many rental options around here, so I've been pondering buying a used road bike off CL  It all depends on how much money I can divert into an offshore account without my wife knowing:D

Something like this maybe:  http://newjersey.craigslist.org/bik/5476934574.html

MSRP was $2300 new and reviews seem to be very good.  Not sure how much I could get it for, but I figure this would be better than buying a new entry level and then wanting to upgrade in a couple of years.  I am already getting the gear bug.

 

Suggestions?

Unless you can get him down to $200 don't buy that. Keep looking, or come test ride some new bikes. For a little over $700 you could be on a brand new modern bike, in the proper size with lifetime free adjustments. While I might be just a little biased, really, don't spend $500 on that.

post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by northeasterner View Post

 

Sizing would be critical I guess.

 

 

This for sure.  The Bianchi might be ok IF it fits you.  And you are right.  It was a pretty good bike that got good reviews.  That said, I agree with RtPtW and would probably keep looking.

 

I think you might find the Bianchi aficionado's saying that is about the going price for that bike.  I doubt he would sell it for $300.  Probably not even $400 but it doesn't hurt to try.  But then it comes back to size.

 

All this snow and I'm talking bicycles when I should be out the door and on a chair.

post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike78 View Post
 

 

 

All this snow and I'm talking bicycles when I should be out the door and on a chair.

Not a problem we are having here.

post #34 of 45

Not sure if you are aware of this site but since you are considering used bikes here is a link you might find useful

 

http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/

 

Now I am out the door

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 

Unless you can get him down to $200 don't buy that. Keep looking, or come test ride some new bikes. For a little over $700 you could be on a brand new modern bike, in the proper size with lifetime free adjustments. While I might be just a little biased, really, don't spend $500 on that.

Just curious, but, what new bike can you buy for $700 what is it's groupo, and, is the saddle any good? I ride a 6 year old Trek  Al 2.3  with Shimano 105 system that I bought about 6 years ago for $1300. I consider it the Honda Accord of road bikes, more basic, not real light, fully functional, should last forever with minimal  issues. Maybe present value is $500, but, I rather have that than a very low end new bike. My opinion, feel free to disagree.

 

I think road bike owners take very good care of their machines, would not hesitate to buy a good used bike. I would be a little concerned about a carbon frame due to possible damage. I would take a very good look at the tires, because if worn, then you are looking at another $100.

 

And, yes, sizing is everything,  and, the bikes you listed are not the same size. Lot of good info on the internet about how to do it, it is not rocket science to get close enough. Very fine tuning of any bike probably needs a pro, and, I think that what you start with may need some adjustment as your body adapts to riding.

 

I will throw out a guess that a decent road bike will be about 2 miles per hour faster than an older cross trainer, when riding with the same effort. That assumes a lot things, I have both but it's been a while since I have ridden the cross trainer on the road.

post #36 of 45


Right now Cannondale has CAAD8 with Claris on sale for $699 and Specialized has the Allez Sport on sale for $769 with Sora. I also have some leftovers on sale for similar money. From what I can see that used Bianchi already had it's right shifter replaced. When the left one goes (and it will) it will cost a little over $100 to replace it. 

post #37 of 45
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys.  Good pros and cons for new vs.. used.  Unfortunately I will be divorced if I spend $700 for a bike at this time when I just got into the game and have gotten 2 used bikes in the last 2 years.  

 

I went to check out a Felt F85 on CL  that was listed for $300.  Although it was a 56cm which I thought would be my size, I could see it was too small from the get go.  It was the sellers wife's bike, but he had another bike for himself that was 58cm that he was waffling on listing.  I test drove it a bit and it was pretty nice and I was able to get it for $350.  It is a 2009 Motobecane Sprint with Ultegra gearing and it  has a lot of higher end componentry and the price was right so I took it.

 

Things I've noticed.

 

The shifting on this is ridiculously smooth compared to my hybrids and the gearing made the small short stretches of incline (can't even call them hills) much easier to ascend.  Downhills also were geared much better as on my hybrid I really am not maximizing my speed because the gearing is too low (?) and I can barely keep pace with the pedals even in top gear.

 

The seat on this bike was horrible and my ass was sore after 30 minutes of riding.  The seat on my hybrid is actually very comfortable so I will swap them out.

 

The ride is a bit harsher on this bike, which I would expect with the skinny tires and there is carbon which I understand is not very forgiving.

 

This bike is very quick compared to my hybrid.  No wonder roadies would pass me out and look like they were pedaling half as hard.  Livingppoof, my time on my usual route was a bit more than 2mph quicker on this bike than my hybrid.  That is a guesstimate because Mapmyride did not record my ride, thought I had started it but apparently not.  I used a text sent just before my ride as my start time and calculated.  I rode 26.6 miles in ~ 1:35 which is ` 16.6 mph. My other rides of the same route/length I averaged 14.2 mph.

 

The hybrid is much easier to maneuver with the brakes right where I normally keep my hands on the handlebars.  This will be minimized when I get used to it.

 

After I take a couple more rides I will likely need to have the fitting fine tuned, so you will see be seeing me again soon RPTW.

 

Keep in mind that these are observations made by someone who has nothing to baseline it against.

 

Gregg

post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 


Right now Cannondale has CAAD8 with Claris on sale for $699 and Specialized has the Allez Sport on sale for $769 with Sora. I also have some leftovers on sale for similar money. From what I can see that used Bianchi already had it's right shifter replaced. When the left one goes (and it will) it will cost a little over $100 to replace it. 

RPTW

I did see that you are a bike dealer, so, I should have known that there are road bikes available for around $750. At my LBS, upselling is the "order of the day" to the staff. It is somewhat analogous to skiing gear forums where newbs are warned not to by low end gear. Bike saddles are among the first items mentioned that need upgrading, I feel a little sticker shocked looking at upgrads. I did a search of the Philly area craigslist for road bikes in the 400 - 600 range, and, found many I would be willing to recommend as better value to a newer roadbiker.  Not trying to sabotage sales of a good LBS, they get my tune up business each year. 

 

Norhteasterner

Solid Ultegra components make that a good buy, and, it should work great for your training. Glad you got the experience of checking out the actual fit, that's the only way to buy a frame. Keep on riding. I'd love to ride in the rockies, the fitness level required, I will be 70 this summer intimidates me more than a little.

post #39 of 45

I can fully understand where the OP is coming from.  As much as  I wanted a brand new bike I didn't have the cash on hand.  So I did a lot of research and asked a lot of experienced riders for information and I slowly bought my bike piece by piece LOL.  All in all I have about $850 in my bike which includes the labor to have it cabled.  $250 for the Lemond Alp D'Huez frame, forks, stem, bars and a wheel set was my starting point.  Now I'm running an Ultegra 6600 drive train with 105 5600 brifters.  I guess it was my own payment plan.  I promise though that my next bike will be the full on experience from the LBS.  I buy stuff from them all the time and they have helped me so much. 

post #40 of 45
Thread Starter 

Yes, I think I have bee bitten by the bug and would not be surprised if I am upgrading to a new road bike in a couple of years. I did not want to invest in a new bike without first seeing if I will be into road cycling or not.  Time will tell.

post #41 of 45


The great thing about cycling much like skiing is that it can be whatever you want it to be. You can go all out into full competitive mode or go for distance or both.  It can be social or just a time to blow of steam and unwind.  I'm more of a social rider but the I always try to get a full century ride in every year.  we have a bunch of local charity rides and even if I don't sign up with someone I know I always end up falling in with another rider my pace and chatting up the rest of the way.  It's much like meeting people riding the lift.  Cycling is fun on the road or off it.  I hope you find it as rewarding as I do.

post #42 of 45

@northeasterner , thanks for starting this thread.  SO and I are planning to spend a week near Carbondale this summer and I have been wondering about riding in high altitude also. The Courage Classic route map got me started thinking more about the trip, he might really like Cooper Loop.

 

Well, if your event is near Los Angeles, I would have easily connect you with our local non-profit organization that lends out free road bikes to those who are training for a charity ride, especially first timers.  http://www.bicycling.com/culture/charity-rides/this-non-profit-makes-it-easy-to-ride-for-a-cause

 

No one has mentioned bringing your own saddle...in addition to pedals and shoes.  What's the general feeling about that?  I love my saddle and brought mine to Glaciers/Waterton Lakes NPs to be used on rental road bike out of Whitefish.  Going-to-the-Sun (climbing from both directions!) late May was THE most spectacular place I have ever ridden. Am looking forward riding in CO too!!!

post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainbow Jenny View Post
 

No one has mentioned bringing your own saddle...in addition to pedals and shoes.  What's the general feeling about that?  I love my saddle and brought mine to Glaciers/Waterton Lakes NPs to be used on rental road bike out of Whitefish.  Going-to-the-Sun (climbing from both directions!) late May was THE most spectacular place I have ever ridden. Am looking forward riding in CO too!!!

 

Depends if you have developed the condition known as Iron Ass or not..  :D  Most people have not..so I'd bring my own saddle personally..

post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 

No, I don't have Iron Ass yet:)  The saddle on my hybrid is pretty comfortable, but the one on my new purchase is either terrible or I am just not yet used to it.  I will certainly bring mine with me.

 

We're starting to firm up dates for our trip and I have a little tip that I had heard about but never looked into regarding rental cars.  If you select the airport as pickup location the rates are literally 3x the cost of picking up in Denver.  You take a shuttle to the rental pickup even if you select the airport, so it is not much difference than taking a hotel shuttle or an Uber to a rental place in town, some are just an extra 2 or 3 miles.  That's my tip of the day:)

 

Really looking forward to this trip as I've never been out west in the summer.

post #45 of 45


Colorado in the summer is almost as good as it is in the winter, almost.  We spent at week in Avon last summer and had a great time. 

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