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post #61 of 66
Thread Starter 

This past weekend I shared with my coaches some of the pictures and some of "my thoughts" (but really from the collective thoughts here).

 

My poles were confiscated, lol.  I was given two drills, both without poles.

 

1)  At transition, push new inside knee down into the new turn.  I immediately feel a big difference in dynamic balance. At first I thought, push down inside knee, wouldn't that put too much weight on the inside?  Nope, I push on the ball of the outside foot, and this platform was so stable, I felt like there was a lot left "in the tank" to make adjustments.  I was certainly hip dumping and to a certain extent "park and ride".  I was simply using my core strength to power myself out of the turn, it wasn't efficient skiing.

 

2)  At completion of old turn, initiate new turn by pushing on little toe edge of new outside ski.  My old ski move was simply using my core strength to thrust hips forward at transition.  As it turns out I wasn't doing it consistently even though I thought I was, and my wildly swinging arms / thrust forward was used to compensate.  When the coach asked me to focus and initiate from the LTE of new outside ski, I notice a lot of new sensations that I wasn't feeling before.  Much more grip, much more bite, much more balance.  I have to unlearn my old ski move and learn to initiate correctly in the kinetic chain.  But I think I know the feeling now.

 

I am finding new sensations of control and balance.  All without flinging arms to get my COM forward.  Overall good progress.

post #62 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galun View Post
 

This past weekend I shared with my coaches some of the pictures and some of "my thoughts" (but really from the collective thoughts here).

 

My poles were confiscated, lol.  I was given two drills, both without poles.

 

1)  At transition, push new inside knee down into the new turn.  I immediately feel a big difference in dynamic balance. At first I thought, push down inside knee, wouldn't that put too much weight on the inside?  Nope, I push on the ball of the outside foot, and this platform was so stable, I felt like there was a lot left "in the tank" to make adjustments.  I was certainly hip dumping and to a certain extent "park and ride".  I was simply using my core strength to power myself out of the turn, it wasn't efficient skiing.

 

2)  At completion of old turn, initiate new turn by pushing on little toe edge of new outside ski.  My old ski move was simply using my core strength to thrust hips forward at transition.  As it turns out I wasn't doing it consistently even though I thought I was, and my wildly swinging arms / thrust forward was used to compensate.  When the coach asked me to focus and initiate from the LTE of new outside ski, I notice a lot of new sensations that I wasn't feeling before.  Much more grip, much more bite, much more balance.  I have to unlearn my old ski move and learn to initiate correctly in the kinetic chain.  But I think I know the feeling now.

 

I am finding new sensations of control and balance.  All without flinging arms to get my COM forward.  Overall good progress.

 

This is a most agreeable shift in consciousness. With every level of advancement it will always be a productive endeavor to recycle through these types of asset restriction exercises such as, in addition, one ski drills. For your reintroduction (reverse confiscation) of ski poles and their use, I have prepared for you a conceptual opportunity for an attitudinal alignment relative to poles, their use and value:

 

In a manner of speaking, good skiing is an example of taking all that is given and making the most out of it which is a cornerstone concept for anything dynamically athletic. It is in this light I wish to establish a seclusionary focus on the arms and ski poles and ask the question: What is it about the arms and the ski poles that could possibly be worth forcing that bulk of intellectually driven non-intuitive motor absorption through an ever-narrowing and winding vessel of intellectual flow of abstract ideas such as to refer it to as an umbrella of orientation, the tactical deployment of terrain diplomacy, the autonomous supplement of directional inertia, a stabbing fusion of integration, the sanctuary of stability, the administration of rhythm, the temple of timing, the harness of harmony, the pulse of movement and its powers of initiation as the very first movement in the chronological turn cycle chain of movements that is associated with what otherwise may, to some, present as a simple sport of gravity, snow, sliding, gliding and smiling?

 

Well, let me tell you. First of all, you are not a Smurf. You were preselected by an unknown entity to inhabit the highly complex bio-organic form of a human being with which to technologically harness the unique conception of combining gravity, slope and surface into the creation of resultant forces that would send shivers up and down a dead man’s spine. It is due to these the widely held beliefs that the aspiring skier is thrust into accepting the all virtue of such complexity along with a trip or two through the land confusion, a few dips in the river of denial and the occasional excursion across the brink of sanity. A wider perspective could be to view snowsports on a sliding scale with technical dynamism of skiing with a great pole touch on one end and a toboggan ride on the other. Short of cramming a dozen Smurfs onto a toboggan and giving it a good shove down a double black, I’d rather be skiing, and therefore, move towards the opposite end of the scale and away from the ill fated shrill of screaming tiny purple people. Should they ever return for revenge, I will indeed have ski poles in hand with which to defend myself and, if successful, will have cartoon ski pole shish kabob for lunch.

 

Moving on to the more serious side of the technically dynamic superiority of the ski pole and certain analogous applications of its crucial essence. The pole plant is the lightening rod to a sound night’s sleep in the hurricane of force vectors. It is the beacon of light shed onto the darkness of motor chaos. It is the antenna of the hunting praying mantis and the vibration on Charlotte’s web. It is the fan to the fog of war and the pen to its declaration. It is the flaming spiral to a target well sought and the exit stage left to the line forgot. It is the electrical conduction of Frankenstein's murderous rage and the olive branch to his yearning of a simple friend. It is the gravitational pull on the lowest lying fruit and the shed of water pulled by the root. It is the needle to a syringe’s answer to all the problems of life and the slick lies leading to that next fix of strife. It is the scalpel of separation and the selector of distinction. It is the radar of a brand new battleship and the sensors on the rockets enroute to sink it to the bottom of time. It is the ligament between the muscle of skill and the cartilage running from bone to bone. It is the accelerometer to Grand Theft Auto and the raised hair on the back of the neck as the cops close in. It is the scope on the rifle and the scent on the nose of its prey. It is the signal of danger and the comfort of a map to the liquor store after all is said and done.

 

To examine the importance of learning a sound conventional pole plant we must look at the full lineage of an individual’s life span of ski technique development and the sequence of its idyllic order. It can be difficult to muster the motivation for learning such a complex maneuver for which the benefits are spread wide and thin across all movement patterns and many of which are reserved for advanced stages that have yet to be fathomed. It is further misleading as it is more and more practiced with a reduction of visible cues and is a modern minimalistic production that is best reached from the mitigation of its full form. As a non-intuitive movement pattern, its development rests squarely on the shoulders of a more formal extension of learning than many are unaccustomed to in such a physically challenging environment. To learn it properly requires the understanding of its importance, the value of its future use, the insight to identify its need, the vision to recognize it among a dizzying forest of movement, the humility to ask for help and the determination to fully integrate it into the godly realm of unconscious motor pattern saturated with purpose.

 

For those of you who wish to indulge in the fantasy of the complete liberation of its costs due, cast a blind eye across its value and hastily reject it for its timeless convention I say, go forth and eat your sweet and sugary cake of denial and put off the dentist’s drill for yet another day. As for me, off I go to brush my teeth and to enjoy the everlasting fruit of thy labor with a shiny white smile.

post #63 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post
 

 

 

*sighs* Ok, same gate, way more vertical separation, more level hips and the inside shin at a similar angle to the outside, if Ted isn't hip dumping, what is he doing? Because I've always called that move hip dumping. Also, this isn't an attack on Ted, it was just the first photo that came up that showed what I wanted to describe. 

Agree, there is definitely a bit of hip dumping going on. If you draw a line like I did in the previous figures, I think you would also find that Neureuter's knee is more aligned than Ligety's.

 

Interesting... while Felix has a little more vertical separation than Ted - I don't really agree on the hip dumping aspect of it. What I call hip dumping is an entire pattern of getting the skis on edge, which OP demonstrates in his sequence (with banking as well).

 

In fact in this case, there's nothing else they could have done - it's an off camber turn and if they tipped that inside foot any more, they'd boot out instantly...?

post #64 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

 

Interesting... while Felix has a little more vertical separation than Ted - I don't really agree on the hip dumping aspect of it. What I call hip dumping is an entire pattern of getting the skis on edge, which OP demonstrates in his sequence (with banking as well).

 

In fact in this case, there's nothing else they could have done - it's an off camber turn and if they tipped that inside foot any more, they'd boot out instantly...?

What "they" are you talking about? Felix is not hip dumping, and he has much higher angles than Ted.

post #65 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
 
 

Felix is not hip dumping, and he has much higher angles than Ted.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post
 

 

 

 

Agree, there is definitely a bit of hip dumping going on. 

 
 

:o

post #66 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

 

:o

You have removed the text I was responding to, it was about Ted, not Felix. The Picture of Felix just happened to be there when responding with a quote. Felix was used as an example of better position at the same gate as Ted. 

 

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