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Advice for skiing straight. Sometimes I have to.

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I tried pressing down on one ski and it worked on the green runs.  What about in powder.  Sometimes skiing straight is the only option and I need to get solid.  I almost wrecked in Mineral Basin Snowbird.

post #2 of 18

What exactly do you mean by skiing straight? I assumed you meant straight as in not turning, but your first sentence regarding pressure one ski has me confused.

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsk94 View Post
 

What exactly do you mean by skiing straight? I assumed you meant straight as in not turning, but your first sentence regarding pressure one ski has me confused.

I'm stupid so bear with me

post #4 of 18
Can you give us an example of places you're talking about? Cat tracks? Flat run outs? Traversing? Pressuring a ski will make it turn.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Cat tracks, powder

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Can you give us an example of places you're talking about? Cat tracks? Flat run outs? Traversing? Pressuring a ski will make it turn.


Anything any slope anywhere, powder.  I almost wrecked in the powder.  Sometimes theres a traverse path where we have to follow straight.

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post
 

Cat tracks, powder


Anything any slope anywhere, powder.  I almost wrecked in the powder.  Sometimes theres a traverse path where we have to follow straight.


I want to blast in a straight line with no skis vibrating side to side.  My ski instructor does it Im going to ask him but I also need extra feedback

post #7 of 18

I was going to suggest taking a lesson, but it sounds like you are.Thumbs Up

 

Snowbird is no place for beginners or low intermediates, even if you are taking lessons.

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Can you give us an example of places you're talking about? Cat tracks? Flat run outs? Traversing? Pressuring a ski will make it turn.

Huh? I can balance on a single ski (11.5m radius) while carrying an additional 30 to 40 pounds and ski in a straight line. How much more pressure do I need to make the ski turn? biggrin.gif
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

I was going to suggest taking a lesson, but it sounds like you are.Thumbs Up

 

Snowbird is no place for beginners or low intermediates, even if you are taking lessons.


All my instructors admire me because I'm recovering from a fatal crash.  I survived because I had a DOT certified helmet

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacmantwoskis View Post


Huh? I can balance on a single ski (11.5m radius) while carrying an additional 30 to 40 pounds and ski in a straight line. How much more pressure do I need to make the ski turn? biggrin.gif


That sounds like a serious correction to my way of thinking

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


That sounds like a serious correction to my way of thinking

Maybe if I tell my skis they have been gaining weight, and tell them that they need to lose 20 pounds or else I will leave them, they will turn for me? Maybe that's the kind of pressure they need?
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


All my instructors admire me because I'm recovering from a fatal crash.  I survived because I had a DOT certified helmet

Aha, you are Lazarus! roflmao.gif
post #13 of 18

In powder it is important to keep both skis equally weighted and fairly close together so they don't take off in two different directions. Even then going in a straight line can be challenging because unless your weight is perfectly centered you will veer off to one side or the other, so it's a question of how good your balance is. Also, any irregularity in the snow will do the same thing. Going straight in low angle powder is actually the hardest thing to do in powder (and if you fall getting up can be a real challenge). 

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacmantwoskis View Post


Aha, you are Lazarus! roflmao.gif


Wasn't Lazarus the guy who was dead at the tomb and all that.  He didn't have a DOT helmet though.  I think he had a DOT rock.  Didn't Jesus have a helmet.  I forgot because they have so many tails.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


Wasn't Lazarus the guy who was dead at the tomb and all that.  He didn't have a DOT helmet though.  I think he had a DOT rock.  Didn't Jesus have a helmet.  I forgot because they have so many tails.

Well, you did say that you were recovering from a fatal crash, so naturally I assumed that you've recently been risen from the dead.
post #16 of 18
I am here to post in this important thread.
post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 

Someone please post as long as it's not Rachael Ray

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

In powder it is important to keep both skis equally weighted and fairly close together so they don't take off in two different directions. Even then going in a straight line can be challenging because unless your weight is perfectly centered you will veer off to one side or the other, so it's a question of how good your balance is. Also, any irregularity in the snow will do the same thing. Going straight in low angle powder is actually the hardest thing to do in powder (and if you fall getting up can be a real challenge). 


Old Goat great advice.  I will get drunk and  deal

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