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Did I tune correctly?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Just tuned my skis for the first time, and using initially a regular stone and then a diamond stone with a guide set for base at 1 degree and sides at 2 degrees did the edges. This is on a pair of Salomon X-Drive 75 skis. I then waxed the bottoms a few times, just going over the drips of wax with the iron set at about 120 degrees C, and while doing so the wax streaked up before I scraped and brushed it away. This streaking is normal, correct?

 

On a side note, when I put a straight edge on the ski and shine a flashlight on the other side, all throughout the ski there is a slight concave towards the middle and less light at the sides. It is slight, enough for the light to come through but not enough to slide a piece of paper underneath. The light is not completely uniform, just a little more in the middle.

 

Also, When I look at the metal edges, it looks as if they slightly wing out towards the ground (when the ski is upside down) so they aren't flat. This is good, right?

post #2 of 18

Lots of shaped skis will be a little low in the middle like that, not a big issue.

 

Not sure about the wing effect, have you cut back the sidewall of the ski ? If not that may be pushing the stone off.

 

 

IMO first off you need to verify the bases are flat with the Ski Visions base flattening tools. Then just verify the base edge has no high spots in it by sliding the Moonflex diamond stone which is held at 1* in a base guide tool, hint, not a plastic one.

You should not be removing much if any metal from the base edge.

 

Then after you have cut the sidewalls back, put the Moonflex in a steel edge guide, most of us use a 3* and set the edge.

 

Then wax.

 

Not sure what your saying about streaking?

 

not sure, but I think 120C is to hot. You want to melt the wax, it shouldn't smoke.

 

I'm sure your reading other threads here about tuning, we have posted links to tools in some of those.

 

Tognar tools google it. lot of info on the site.  http://www.tognar.com/ski-and-snowboard-tuning-tools/

 

 

Got my ski visions tools from here, http://www.slidewright.com/ Terry is a trusted person to buy from with great customer service.

 

FWIW, I'm not a fan of adjustable guides.


Edited by Max Capacity - 3/11/16 at 9:32am
post #3 of 18

You can't set the base bevel and side edge bevel with a diamond stone.

 

Ya gotta use a file!

 

 

Initially a regular stone, WTF is a regular stone?

 

120C is correct. Dominator recommended Iron Temp.

post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
All of the instructional videos I've seen call for using a diamond stone in the guided tool.
post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by coasterblu View Post

All of the instructional videos I've seen call for using a diamond stone in the guided tool.

That is for maintaining the edge (and I should add all done on the side edge ONLY!) and for polishing a the edge after setting the bevels with a file!

post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by coasterblu View Post

All of the instructional videos I've seen call for using a diamond stone in the guided tool.


That is not the complete process. Setting the initial edge angles is done by a shop with their machine, or by you with a file, or maybe a combination of the two. Once the angles are set, THEN you use stones in progressively finer grits to polish the edges.

 

Theoretically, you could use a file to set the angles only once in the life of the skis. Regular daily/weekly/etc sharpening is done with the "stones". You don't set angles with stones.

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

You can't set the base bevel and side edge bevel with a diamond stone.

 

Ya gotta use a file!

 

 

Initially a regular stone, WTF is a regular stone?

 

120C is correct. Dominator recommended Iron Temp.


Oh I see 120C is 248F, I'm good now. ;)

 

Oh I see now where I miss spoke. Yes use a file to set the 3* edge keep it there after every ski day with a Moonflex.

 

May be the MOD's can put together a basic tuning thread, so we can send new members there for the basics so we don't go through this once a week.

post #8 of 18
Then Jacques wouldn't have new threads to post his videos in.

Tuning articles here: http://www.epicski.com/atype/2/Gear/tag/care-and-upkeep

The "winging down" of the base edge I think is just the base bevel.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

You can't set the base bevel and side edge bevel with a diamond stone.

 

Ya gotta use a file!

 

 

Initially a regular stone, WTF is a regular stone?

 

120C is correct. Dominator recommended Iron Temp.


Oh I see 120C is 248F, I'm good now. ;)

 

Oh I see now where I miss spoke. Yes use a file to set the 3* edge keep it there after every ski day with a Moonflex.

 

May be the MOD's can put together a basic tuning thread, so we can send new members there for the basics so we don't go through this once a week.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Then Jacques wouldn't have new threads to post his videos in.

Tuning articles here: http://www.epicski.com/atype/2/Gear/tag/care-and-upkeep

The "winging down" of the base edge I think is just the base bevel.


What would the fun of that be!  No Funitol.  Take a Geritol instead! 

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by coasterblu View Post
 

Just tuned my skis for the first time, and using initially a regular stone and then a diamond stone with a guide set for base at 1 degree and sides at 2 degrees did the edges. This is on a pair of Salomon X-Drive 75 skis. I then waxed the bottoms a few times, just going over the drips of wax with the iron set at about 120 degrees C, and while doing so the wax streaked up before I scraped and brushed it away. This streaking is normal, correct?

 

On a side note, when I put a straight edge on the ski and shine a flashlight on the other side, all throughout the ski there is a slight concave towards the middle and less light at the sides. It is slight, enough for the light to come through but not enough to slide a piece of paper underneath. The light is not completely uniform, just a little more in the middle.

 

Also, When I look at the metal edges, it looks as if they slightly wing out towards the ground (when the ski is upside down) so they aren't flat. This is good, right?


Okay, when you say streaky we need photos, and to know what kind of wax your using.  Graphite's and mollies can leave a streaking effect as the graphite remains in some places more than others.  Also any wax may look that way as some spots may be a bit thicker or thinner.  That's where you need to scrape and brush really good.   As for a flat base from what you say seems flat enough to me.  Don't get to hung up on a base being perfectly flat.  A concave base will be quicker to engage as the edges will be in constant contact with the snow.  Convex bases will be more fun and not so fast to engage.  Many skis will be variations of this flatness.  Usually we see these effects more at the tips and tails of skis and the centers are usually the flattest.   Again, these variations make a ski handle differently.

 

So without further delay here is the starting video of how to tune a new ski.  The same applies for a used ski for the most part.  Where things are different for a used ski, I point that out.  Good luck to you!  Keep doing your ski work and you will get better at it, just as you get better skiing as you ski more.  A well tuned ski is good for skiing progression.  A crappy tuned ski will hold you back like a "B"!

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Alright, thanks. If you remove burrs, what kind of stone should you be using? A diamond stone? What angle should you hold it?
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by coasterblu View Post

Alright, thanks. If you remove burrs, what kind of stone should you be using? A diamond stone? What angle should you hold it?

Arkansas or surgical stone.

 

flat against the base edge in contact with the metal.


Edited by Atomicman - 3/12/16 at 8:10am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

Arkansas or surgical stone.

flat against the base edge in contact with the metal.

Yes, for the final step of removing the hanging burr, but I assumed he was asking about the first step of removing larger burrs from rock damage?

If that's the case, I start with a coarse "regular" stone (ceramic) on the side edge, held with the guide at the same edge angle I tune to. And also a freehand pass along the base edge with a finer ceramic stone to make sure you've removed all the burr.

I guess you could use a coarse diamond stone for that too, but the ceramic works fine and is cheaper.
post #14 of 18
Since he was speaking of tuning and had already tuned the skis.........
Edited by Atomicman - 3/12/16 at 6:06pm
post #15 of 18
I was thinking it was a second question, and that he said "if".

Removing the hanging burr shouldn't be optional. But rock damage doesn't happen all the time, so that's the "if"...

But you may very well be correct.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post
 


That is not the complete process. Setting the initial edge angles is done by a shop with their machine, or by you with a file, or maybe a combination of the two. Once the angles are set, THEN you use stones in progressively finer grits to polish the edges.

 

Theoretically, you could use a file to set the angles only once in the life of the skis. Regular daily/weekly/etc sharpening is done with the "stones". You don't set angles with stones.

 

I have a nooby question, how come this can only be done once in the life of the skis? Wouldn't this depend on how much material you have left on the edges?

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by HulaHoop View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post
 


That is not the complete process. Setting the initial edge angles is done by a shop with their machine, or by you with a file, or maybe a combination of the two. Once the angles are set, THEN you use stones in progressively finer grits to polish the edges.

 

Theoretically, you could use a file to set the angles only once in the life of the skis. Regular daily/weekly/etc sharpening is done with the "stones". You don't set angles with stones.

 

I have a nooby question, how come this can only be done once in the life of the skis? Wouldn't this depend on how much material you have left on the edges?

 

I believe that's a misread of the original sentence.   

The original sentence was directed to saying that, in an ideal world, you would only need to use a file only once in the lifetime of any given set of skis.     

But we live in a world where s***t happens, so you might do more than that.

post #18 of 18
Absolutely it would depend on the material left on the edges. But, assuming soft snow and no rocks, you might never file again and just maintain it with stones. Or you could change them to a different angle or find you need to sharpen them a lot due to hard conditions or you might ding the edge on rocks, etc. Most of us file at least every season, and some seem to go nuts and file weekly (not me).
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