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Ski Recommendation [first purchase for east coast intermediate]

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I am in the market for my first pair of skis. I unfortuately will not be able to demo before I buy so I'd like to poll the crowd about what might be the best skis for me based on my vital stats.

 

I mostly ski groomers + moguls. Usually no powder or off-piste. East coast primarily but a few trips out west once in a while (still focus on groomers). I am probably intermediate (level 5-6).

 

I am not all about going as fast as possible so maximum stiffness is not the main priority. Want something that can hold an edge on ice, be stable with some speed, maneuver okay in moguls (doesn't have to be a world-beater but somewhat forgiving).

 

Any good recs for skis that fit the bill? Really looking forward to owning my own pair so I can stop bleeding money on crappy rentals. I have my own boots BTW, so the skis are the only missing piece. 

post #2 of 23

Welcome to Epic.  I'd recommend looking to see if you can find a used Head Rev 80 in good condition or, failing that, consider the Head iSupershape Titan, also 80mm waist.  Bot are excellent skis for back east and can also be used in the west.  I skied the iSupershape Rally last week on very firm snow and it was great.  I even took it into the trees and found a little powder and it performed quite nicely.  It was a really fun ski and I didn't have to work terribly hard to ski it.  Head says the iSupershapes are for advanced-expert skiers but I think that's overstating it.  Either ski will hold on ice as long as it has good tune.  Nordica Fire Arrow 80 Ti would also work very well, but may require a higher level of skill.

post #3 of 23
You don't indicate your weight. Or what boot you have. Or sex. That's useful info. But.

If you're lighter to average, and a male, then yep the Rally or the Rev 80. The Rossi E83 is another nice candidate for the bumps, not as good as the Rally on firm. Not so sure about the Titan. Get back on them and you could be off to the races. If you're heavier, or worry more about ice than bumps, you might also look at the new Volkl RTM's or one of the Blizzards in the 75-81 mm range. Again, some of depends on your size, sex etc.
post #4 of 23

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Edited by FF9000 - 3/10/16 at 11:02am
post #5 of 23

What is difference between Rev series and Instinct series?

post #6 of 23
The Instinct series skis are lighter in weight than the Rev series. Principal difference is the core material. In the Rev series it was wood, IIRC, and in the Instinct series it is foam. The Instinct series skis also have graphene in them which, so I've been told, adds torsional rigidity.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

The Instinct series skis are lighter in weight than the Rev series. Principal difference is the core material. In the Rev series it was wood, IIRC, and in the Instinct series it is foam. The Instinct series skis also have graphene in them which, so I've been told, adds torsional rigidity.

Since the Rev is no longer offered by Head (I do not think there is a new version this year), is the Instinct the successor to it? Is the Rev better in some fundamental way so that it's better to purchase an older model just to get the Rev?

post #8 of 23
The Rev is gone, but the Instinct is not a replacement. The Monster would be closer to a replacement but even it isn't. For heavier skiers the Rev is probably better than the Instinct and the Monster is even better for heavier skiers.
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

What about for a lighter skiier (165)?

post #10 of 23

I'm 5'7", 150 pounds and have skied the Monster 88, iSupershape Rally(just narrower than the Titan) and liked them both for different reasons.  If I didn't already have a very serious carver, Nordica Fire Arrow 84EDT, I would probably get an iSupershape Rally.

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF9000 View Post
 

Since the Rev is no longer offered by Head (I do not think there is a new version this year), is the Instinct the successor to it? Is the Rev better in some fundamental way so that it's better to purchase an older model just to get the Rev?

 

Closest comparison I can come up with would be the Rev 78 and Natural Instinct.  Both non wood non metal skis.  I've owned the 78 and skied the Natural.  I would take the 78 hands down over the Natural.  For me the others are not necessarily apples to apples.  I've also tried the Strong and Power Instinct.  Maybe you could compare the strong with the 85?  I've heard some comparing the Power with the Rally but I think that stemmed from an early season review by one of the mags.  Currently my everyday ski is a Rev 90 and honestly I'm not ready to give it up just yet but I don't ski in the east either.  I do keep thinking about the Monster 83.   

post #12 of 23

You should be able to get a good deal this spring after the lousy season the east has had.  Shops are loaded with inventory they need to get rid of.  Just about any all-mountain ski from a major mfr with a waist width from 75 to 80 or so would be where I would be looking.  

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

Welcome to Epic.  I'd recommend looking to see if you can find a used Head Rev 80 in good condition or...

Funny, I asked very similar questions here a few years ago and the Rev 80 is what I ended up with. Great ski. I'm 5'7" 130lbs male, in case the OP needs a comparison.

 

Anyone know why Head didn't make the Rev series this year?

post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 

Hey guys I am considering buying the Rev 80 170cm.

 

I need to get bindings since the only place I found that sells them in this size sells them without bindings.

 

Is there a suggestion on which bindings to get with this ski? I will go to REI to get them mounted since they do it for $25 for members...but I want to make sure I get a decent binding. 

 

I've seen a lot of times these skis come with Head PR 11 bindings, for what it's worth. Thanks!

post #15 of 23

Tyrolia AAAtack13/16 bindings are very good.  The PR11 binding is also good but can't be mounted directly to the ski, it requires s Power Rail(PR) which is sold separately.  As long you don't need a DIN over about 9, the PR11 is fine as is the Tyrolia Freeflex 11.  Personally I'd use the AAAtack.  I have it on my Nordica Soul Riders and also used it on my son's Enforcer.

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 

What is the major difference between the Head Rev 80 and the Head Rev 80 Pro?

post #17 of 23

If I remember correctly the Pro has a sheet of metal and non pro doesn't. I think some years there was only one version. I have the pro, with metal, would definitely recommend that one.

post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 

Hmm, from googling the sh*t out of this, I am not sure there is a Rev 80 "Non-Pro" for 2015. Seems like there was just one model. I could be mistaken.

post #19 of 23

Get the Pro, it's better.

post #20 of 23

I wouldn't buy skis without demoing them, unless you've tried a bunch of different skis, and already know what you like.

 

I just finished my third season. NYC based, 5'7", 170-180 pounds, currently a level 8. I bought the Blizzard Brahmas at the beginning of last season. They're great on piste here in the North East, but can handle powder as well. They are consistently top rated, and a fantastic 1 ski quiver for the east coast. When I bought them, I was just learning moguls, and dabbling off-piste. Now I spend as much time off piste as conditions allow, and can still rail on groomers. 

 

Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly. 

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Keller View Post
 

I wouldn't buy skis without demoing them, unless you've tried a bunch of different skis, and already know what you like.

 

I just finished my third season. NYC based, 5'7", 170-180 pounds, currently a level 8. I bought the Blizzard Brahmas at the beginning of last season. They're great on piste here in the North East, but can handle powder as well. They are consistently top rated, and a fantastic 1 ski quiver for the east coast. When I bought them, I was just learning moguls, and dabbling off-piste. Now I spend as much time off piste as conditions allow, and can still rail on groomers. 

 

Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly. 


Hi: Can you clarify what do you mean by: "Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly."?  

Reason I am asking is, I need to purchase new pair of skis next season.  So I have been following this thread as well.  Up to now, I've been using "entry level" skis (I am 5'5".  Skis length" 143 cm).  Now I am progressing to intermediate and I need longer length.  

 

If not intermediate skis, what should I get?  The advanced ones?  If so, what is considered "advanced"?  

I was told I need to get something between 147 cm to 155 cm. For sure I will need to "demo" them before purchasing.  Besides the length, I have no idea what I am "demoing" (or look for) when I try on new skis the next season.  So I can use some advice.  Thanks!

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 


Hi: Can you clarify what do you mean by: "Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly."?  

Reason I am asking is, I need to purchase new pair of skis next season.  So I have been following this thread as well.  Up to now, I've been using "entry level" skis (I am 5'5".  Skis length" 143 cm).  Now I am progressing to intermediate and I need longer length.  

 

If not intermediate skis, what should I get?  The advanced ones?  If so, what is considered "advanced"?  

I was told I need to get something between 147 cm to 155 cm. For sure I will need to "demo" them before purchasing.  Besides the length, I have no idea what I am "demoing" (or look for) when I try on new skis the next season.  So I can use some advice.  Thanks!

 

Ski length should be based on your weight and height, not just your height. My girlfriend is a 135lb intermediate skier who is 5'9". Based on her height, she should be on skis that are 170cm or more. But based on her weight, and ability, shorter skis are better. She demoed a few different pairs this season, and to her, the Volkl Kenjas at 163cm felt the best. They're considered an advanced/expert ski.

 

If you ski a lot, I feel that advanced beginner skis will last you long enough till you can get advanced/expert skis. Skip the intermediate step. You'll outgrow them quickly, while you'll be able to continuously improve on advanced skis, pushing them harder.

 

When you demo, you're looking for a ski that 'feels' right to you. No one can tell you what feels right. People can give you guidance based on the terrain you like to ski. 

 

Generally, beginner skis are more forgiving, being softer and easier to flex, and lighter weight than expert skis.

 

http://www.skis.com/Buying-Guide-for-Skis/buying-guide-1-12-2012,default,pg.html

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by fosphenytoin View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan Keller View Post
 

I wouldn't buy skis without demoing them, unless you've tried a bunch of different skis, and already know what you like.

 

I just finished my third season. NYC based, 5'7", 170-180 pounds, currently a level 8. I bought the Blizzard Brahmas at the beginning of last season. They're great on piste here in the North East, but can handle powder as well. They are consistently top rated, and a fantastic 1 ski quiver for the east coast. When I bought them, I was just learning moguls, and dabbling off-piste. Now I spend as much time off piste as conditions allow, and can still rail on groomers. 

 

Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly. 


Hi: Can you clarify what do you mean by: "Do not buy intermediate skis. You'll outgrow them very quickly."?  

Reason I am asking is, I need to purchase new pair of skis next season.  So I have been following this thread as well.  Up to now, I've been using "entry level" skis (I am 5'5".  Skis length" 143 cm).  Now I am progressing to intermediate and I need longer length.  

 

If not intermediate skis, what should I get?  The advanced ones?  If so, what is considered "advanced"?  

I was told I need to get something between 147 cm to 155 cm. For sure I will need to "demo" them before purchasing.  Besides the length, I have no idea what I am "demoing" (or look for) when I try on new skis the next season.  So I can use some advice.  Thanks!


In case you missed it, there are tips about demo'ing skis in a Beginner Zone thread that is actually more for intermediates.  Bottom line is that it's actually easier than you might think to tell when a pair of skis are "fun" versus too much work.  The trick is to be flexible and try a variety of models, including ones that you think are not appropriate based on how they are marketed.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/142999/what-is-a-demo-day-for-skis-a-beginner-zone-thread

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