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Skiing with a backpack

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

I'm planning a Mammoth trip in the upcoming weeks and planning to do at least one, if not two, of the 5 hour day lessons (Split 3 and 2). Would I look like an idiot skiing with a backpack to carry extra layers, goggles, snacks, water, etc... or is it a bad idea just all around to ski downhill with a backpack when more or less first starting out, not quite starting out but practically. Smart idea or bad idea?

post #2 of 13

I did this the for the first (and only) time on my trip to Utah last week. Coming from humid sea level, going to dry high altitude mountains, I was concerned about altitude sickness, so I wanted to make sure I stayed hydrated. I had a small Camelback, I filled it to about a liter and a half. On the lift it was a little annoying, but while skiing I wasn't even noticing it.

 

Doesn't necessarily answer your question, but that's my experience.

post #3 of 13

I skied with a small back pack on my trip to Aspen if Feb.  I only had a few snacks, water and some extra gloves, hat etc.  While I enjoyed having that stuff and I did use most of it, I did notice that my skiing suffered somewhat.  I am an intermediate so that probably effected me more than an advanced or expert skier.  I didn't ski with it the last day and I notice that I was turning much better without it. I think subconsciously I my body was trying to make up for pack when I had it on.   I'm sure not everyone experiences this, just my two cents.

post #4 of 13

My short answer is to not take the pack.  

 

If you insist, it depends what kind of backpack.  Other than perhaps a small, thin, ski-specific pack, I would not recommend carrying a pack for a beginner. Definitely don't take a regular hiking day pack.  

 

A pack won't likely affect your skiing so much, but will make being on the lift more difficult and, perhaps, more dangerous, because it pushes you forward.  It's one more thing to think about that isn't necessary.  

 

I sometime carry a small Dakine ski pack with a hydration bladder, but usually only when I know I will need to carry my skis to hike somewhere, or if I want to carry more camera gear.  

 

I would recommend carrying an energy bar or small snack in your pocket if you think you can't make it to lunch, and a small water bottle.  Ski jackets generally have big inside pockets.  You can always stop somewhere for water or a snack.  Just dress appropriately for the weather, and be able to open zippers, etc. for when you get warm.  Note also that, if it's cold, Camelbacks and the like tend to freeze up, so a water bottle is more useful.  

post #5 of 13

I ski with a small day pack all the time. It's a skiing-specific pack that allows me to have water, an extra layer if the weather may get colder or the space to remove a layer if the weather gets warmer. Snacks and lunch to avoid paying mid-mountain meal prices. Plus a few small safety items like a space blanket and first aid kit (we get into the tree's and back bowls often).

 

Another benefit is it has straps for carrying ski's if I decide to hike.

 

Just makes sense to me and I could care less what others think about it. And I'm used to it so it doesn't bother me a bit on the lifts - although I'm only 5'9" and 150 lbs so bigger folks may feel differently.

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post
 

Hello all,

 

I'm planning a Mammoth trip in the upcoming weeks and planning to do at least one, if not two, of the 5 hour day lessons (Split 3 and 2). Would I look like an idiot skiing with a backpack to carry extra layers, goggles, snacks, water, etc... or is it a bad idea just all around to ski downhill with a backpack when more or less first starting out, not quite starting out but practically. Smart idea or bad idea?


When I'm at a large resort out west, I usually have a small backpack (11L) for an extra pair of socks, gloves, sunscreen, granola bar, etc.  In those cases, I do not expect to get back to where I started at lunch time.  However, for a lesson I would not want to have a pack, even a small one.

 

When I was an intermediate mostly skiing groomers out west, I just put stuff in my pockets.  I tended to go in more often for breaks back then.

 

One of my ski buddies uses a fanny pack.  I tried that but didn't like it.

post #7 of 13
Backpacks can affect a skier's stance and affect weight distribution. Put a credit card in your pocket. Your skiing will thank you.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

Backpacks can affect a skier's stance and affect weight distribution. Put a credit card in your pocket. Your skiing will thank you.

Thumbs Up I hate skiing with anything x-tra on me!

post #9 of 13

I only use a backpack when I think I may be far from the car/lodge/base most of the day (i.e. out west, and not in the mid-Atlantic). It's a small one that is low profile - I could probably wear it under my jacket if I wanted to. I don't think it really affects things - I don't notice it, and as I empty it (of Gatorade or water throughout the day) I don't notice the weight change. 

 

I took an all day intermediate lesson at Aspen this year while wearing it, and I don't think I had any issues.

 

I could certainly see a larger, heavier pack being a real issue.

post #10 of 13
I ski with the smallest Dakine helipack 16l? Or so. It has a hydration bladder section. I've been told that my skiing would improve without it, but I've gotten so used to having water, alternate goggle lens, snack bar, extra vest layer, cable lock for skis, and cat tracks for boots with me all the time that I'm loath to ski with my pockets full or my back up supplies in a locker somewhere. If you can live without it, skiing without a backpack is probably better for your form. I typically try to start with first chair (or close to it) and go with no rest until a little after lunch and then stop for the day and having water and snacks and supplies with me all the time helps me do that. At least that's my excuse. biggrin.gif

Update, just checked and the bag is 11 liters, not 16. It's the previous version of this bag http://www.amazon.com/Dakine-Heli-Pack-Black-12/dp/B00WO459WE%3Fpsc%3D1%26SubscriptionId%3DAKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q. Great bag covered hydration pockets and attachment points for skis etc.
Edited by enkidu - 3/8/16 at 7:30pm
post #11 of 13

One of my ski buddies uses a fanny pack.

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

 

One of my ski buddies uses a fanny pack. 

 

Confirm you are no longer friends :)

post #12 of 13

Small camelback or something like that is great.  Love having water, some food, etc.  

post #13 of 13
I use a backpack on occasion when skiing all day with my daughter to keep us both hydrated and to shed a layer during day. It does not affect my skiing at all. My backpack has straps to tighten around my chest and waist to keep it in place. The only thing that sucks is riding the lifts. It's nice to be able to keep hydrated.

Never wear a pack at 7 Springs ski area they are dicks about it on lift.
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