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Recommended skis [for progressing beginner]

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

So I talked to the guys at Powder 7, and they recommended two or three skis for me and wanted to get thought here, all are used skis:

 

Rossignol Experience 78- 2012 Model

 

Dynastar Powertrack 79- 2015 model (said this was probably the all around best choice)

 

Salomon X (Though they said this was a little advanced for where I am now, but could use)

 

Any thoughts on these? Or other recommendations based on these? 

 

 

 

[Mod note: Thread title edited for clarity.]

post #2 of 19

You're apparently looking for a relatively narrow ski for something.  What specifically do you want the ski to do?  There are three fairly different skis on your list so it's a bit confusing what your plan is.  Where you ski, height, weight, ability all have bearing on recommendations.  Also, are you looking specifically for a used ski?

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Not specifically looking for used but I am trying to keep costs down. This is the email I sent them and those were the skis they responded with:

Message: I need ski recommendations. I'm a beginning skier but progressing relatively quickly, my first day out I was already skiing down greens semi-independently and will continue with lessons. I'm 5'5, 200 lbs, hoping to get down to around 150. I'm a piste skier, I like the snow groomed and hard, nothing soft for me. No one can seem to agree on what length or level of ski would work for me. I've had companies recommend 150s and 170s. I've had people recommend beginning level skis such as the RTM 7.3 from Volkl and had someone recommend the iRally to me. Had someone recommend the Cyclic or Venturi or Sin 7 to me because of their heft and easy ability to turn or edge and ability to still perform on piste as well as off, even though I have no plans to go off piste any time soon if ever into the powder. I don't want to spend 200, 300, 400 dollars on a pair to only out grow and over power them by beginning or mid of next season or even the end of this season. I end up skiing about 10mph, nothing too extreme. I was on a pair of Head Natural Instincts (I forget the length but it was either a 150s or 160s), that I had a very hard time controlling and getting on edge, and finding my weight shifts on. I learned most of my basics on a moving carpet using 107length kids skis, so I'd probably be most comfortable on shorter skis, and oddly enough never had too much of a problem getting them to respond to me on the carpet. I don't know the model name but they were Head and were Red, White, and Blue. So any help and advice you can give me would be fantastic. I already own a pair of boots, Fischer Vuse 9, 90 flex.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post

 ....Had someone recommend the Cyclic or Venturi or Sin 7 to me because of their heft and easy ability to turn or edge and ability to still perform on piste as well as off, even though I have no plans to go off piste any time soon if ever into the powder....

You should consider that person an enemy!

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
I didn't take them very seriously
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post
 

So I talked to the guys at Powder 7, and they recommended two or three skis for me and wanted to get thought here, all are used skis:

 

Rossignol Experience 78- 2012 Model

 

Dynastar Powertrack 79- 2015 model (said this was probably the all around best choice)

 

Salomon X (Though they said this was a little advanced for where I am now, but could use)

 

Any thoughts on these? Or other recommendations based on these? 

 

 

 

[Mod note: Thread title edited for clarity.]

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post

Not specifically looking for used but I am trying to keep costs down. This is the email I sent them and those were the skis they responded with:

Message: I need ski recommendations. I'm a beginning skier but progressing relatively quickly, my first day out I was already skiing down greens semi-independently and will continue with lessons. I'm 5'5, 200 lbs, hoping to get down to around 150. I'm a piste skier, I like the snow groomed and hard, nothing soft for me. No one can seem to agree on what length or level of ski would work for me. I've had companies recommend 150s and 170s. I've had people recommend beginning level skis such as the RTM 7.3 from Volkl and had someone recommend the iRally to me. Had someone recommend the Cyclic or Venturi or Sin 7 to me because of their heft and easy ability to turn or edge and ability to still perform on piste as well as off, even though I have no plans to go off piste any time soon if ever into the powder. I don't want to spend 200, 300, 400 dollars on a pair to only out grow and over power them by beginning or mid of next season or even the end of this season. I end up skiing about 10mph, nothing too extreme. I was on a pair of Head Natural Instincts (I forget the length but it was either a 150s or 160s), that I had a very hard time controlling and getting on edge, and finding my weight shifts on. I learned most of my basics on a moving carpet using 107length kids skis, so I'd probably be most comfortable on shorter skis, and oddly enough never had too much of a problem getting them to respond to me on the carpet. I don't know the model name but they were Head and were Red, White, and Blue. So any help and advice you can give me would be fantastic. I already own a pair of boots, Fischer Vuse 9, 90 flex.

Probably help to know what region you are skiing in.  Trail difficulty is only relative to a given mountain.  A green at Sun Valley is very different from a green at Park City or my little home mountain in northern Virginia.  Is this your first season?

post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post

Not specifically looking for used but I am trying to keep costs down. I don't want to spend 200, 300, 400 dollars on a pair to only out grow and over power them by beginning or mid of next season or even the end of this season. I end up skiing about 10mph, nothing too extreme. I was on a pair of Head Natural Instincts (I forget the length but it was either a 150s or 160s), that I had a very hard time controlling and getting on edge, and finding my weight shifts on. I learned most of my basics on a moving carpet using 107length kids skis, so I'd probably be most comfortable on shorter skis, and oddly enough never had too much of a problem getting them to respond to me on the carpet. I don't know the model name but they were Head and were Red, White, and Blue. So any help and advice you can give me would be fantastic. I already own a pair of boots, Fischer Vuse 9, 90 flex.

They were probably Head Bys? One option would be holding off for now and keep renting and taking lessons. The Natural Instinct is what Head calls a true beginner ski. Fairly easy to learn on if you have the proper length. Maybe getting more accustomed to skis a bit longer and in your range would go a long way in making the right choice? Like you said, you don't want to spend $200-$400 only to outgrow something you purchase now.
post #8 of 19
Can you demo skis? And, as someone already stated, where you ski is important. A daily driver in Rockies is not the same as a daily driver in the Sierras or the Poconos. These carpet contraptions don't do people any favors when they're given 100cm skis to use. Anybody can make parallel turns on a ski that short.

The Head Natural Instinct is a beginner ski. I haven't been on it but I own a pair Head Strong Instinct Ti and they are really fun skis. I can carve turns at 40+mph, ski in up to 8" of powder, ski bumps, pretty much all over the mountain and these skis do it all. They're 83mm underfoot and can be a good daily driver in the west. Back east or midwest, I'd say the Supreme Instinct Ti at 74mm underfoot would be a better choice. Th Strong Instinct Ti is a ski that responds nicely to the driver's input. The better the input the better the ski responds. But, unlike some skis, it doesn't punish you if your input isn't great. The Strong and Supreme are both rated for intermediates to experts.
post #9 of 19

The only worthwhile advice I can give you is to demo some skis.  Recommendations based off limited info and no knowledge of you personally is worth what you pay for it.  Many demo shops sell the skis they rent, and will knock off a day or two of demo cost if you buy after trying them out.  I've bought a few skis this way and was able to get exactly what I wanted, usually out the door with bindings for ~$300 (ymmv).  If your demo shop is on the mountain you can try out 3-4 pair a day.  You should be able to find something you enjoy on the conditions you plan to ski.

post #10 of 19

From everything you've said I think you'd be pretty happy with the Dynastar Powertrack 79.  We just did a write up of that ski on our Chairlift Chat blog and it's a pretty impressive intermediate ski.  Really promotes progression.  Easy to ski due to the rockered and early tapered tips and tails, but the partial vertical sidewall gives it some torsional stiffness as progressing skiers start to get more and more aggressive.  Check out our review:

 

Dynastar Powertrack 79 Ca Review

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

West Coast Skier. Mammoth/Big Bear/Mountain High/Tahoe, thoughts of future trips to Jackson Hole and Big Sky in Wyoming and Montana respectively. 

post #12 of 19

Hey @scott112 - Were any of the skis mentioned in your other thread that you were looking at, or that were recommended, still of interest? 

 

Fischer Viron 2.2s

Volkl RTM 73

Rossignol Pursuit 200

Head Supershape Titans

Atomic Nomad

 

Or is there more info you can provide as to why they aren't acceptable? Maybe that would help guide you... if not, I suspect you may be venturing in "paralysis by analysis", where there isn't one ski that ticks off every possible want/need/possibility, so there is no perfect ski for you to buy. In a case like that, I'd say find a good shop, discuss options with a good salesman, and go with his recommendation.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
There was some concern I might over power them because of my weight. Someone described how it felt when you over power a ski sounded like the problems I had with the Head Natural Instincts. So I'm trying to gather as much information as possible, and find out the consensus of stats to look for in these or other skis I find along the way.
post #14 of 19

At 200 pounds you might come close to over powering the Head Titan, but I'm not sure you could.  But, at your target weight there is no chance you can overpower that ski, it will overpower you.

post #15 of 19

I weigh more than you and use Head Rev Pro 80 and Salomon X-Race

I love the Salomon and my son adopted my Head

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post

There was some concern I might over power them because of my weight. 

 

I'm 6', 210 lbs, and probably about a level 6 intermediate skier (depending on what scale you're looking at). And I don't believe I've ever overpowered a ski. My current skis are Atomic Nomad Blackeye's - the non-TI version, so they aren't even as stiff as the TIs. 

 

They've been great for my development the last couple of seasons I think (but a Rossi Experience, or Head Rev80, or Dynastar Powertrack, etc. all would have been good too).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scott112 View Post

...I'm trying to gather as much information as possible...

 

That's laudable, but may work against you if you haven't skied enough to really know how things work and should feel.

post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 

That's laudable, but may work against you if you haven't skied enough to really know how things work and should feel.

Especially when you learn on one of those carpet monstrosities with 100mm skis.

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

I skied in Snow Valley yesterday on an old pair of Rossignol Experience 74, 156. I'm considering just purchasing since it's hard to find rental Rossignols at a resort, and it's a hassle hunting down stores. 

 

I can get the Experience 75 in a 160 at a great price locally. But I'm concerned if they will be as easy. But I think I'm sold on Rossignol. I could buy the exact pair used for 199 or get mine new for 299, bindings included. This model only comes in a 152 and a 160. 

post #19 of 19

I've had a few days and demos on Rossignol Experience skis and I like them. I think they'd be a great choice. 

 

As far as length, at your height/weight I'd tend to go toward the longer one, assuming you'll improve over time.

 

One thing I did last season, was get a longer (rental) ski each time I went out to see what difference it made. (From 150 up to 175, which was the longest rental places around here carry.) I found once I made a couple of runs, and as I was getting better, longer skis were more appropriate. By the end of the season, I wound up buying a 174, which is probably one size larger than I would have expected. 

 

156 to 160 is really a pretty minor difference, and various calculators online seem to put you in the 150-160 range, so I'd suggest the 160 length. Either should work well though.  

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