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Stockli Laser SC: a ski everyone who takes their skiing seriously should own

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Stockli Laser SC 170cm: the ski everyone should own (or something similar)

 

Review: Stockli Laser SC 170cm, mounted with Attack 13 demo bindings  Gives me a bit of lift.  Mounted on the line.  Tune is factory, 1/1. 

 

Shameless plug: these are on closeout for $650 flat (163/170), but I love them even at full retail! Call for details, as they are special order items. 

 

www.dawgcatching.com

 

The ski: Stockli's Laser SC is a do-it-all frontside tool and carver. SC stands for “slalom carver” it is 72mm underfoot, 14.9m radius. The ski has a very interesting flex pattern: quite soft at the tip and tail, quite soft laterally at the tip as well (no stiffer than the Stormrider 95), and fairly stiff underfoot. On snow, this gives the skier a very progressive loading feel, predictable release, and energy on demand, without a mind of it's own.

 

Conditions: skied over 4 days. ½ groomers, ¼ bumps, ¼ buttery windpack and choppy snow off-piste. Groomers ranged from “hero” to soft granular with ice underneath.

 

Tune: out of the box. Very flat ski, tips and tails were detuned past the contact point from the factory. If anything, the edges weren't super sharp out of the wrapper, but they were good enough for this test: I didn't touch anything aside from waxing them well.

 

Construction: full laminate race-room layup. Typical Stockli: beautiful grind, perfectly flat out the wrapper. The ski has 2 sheets of metal, perforated; it skis light and doesn't feel stiff whatsoever. A very approachable ski, easily the most forgiving “carver” I have had the pleasure of owning.

 

On groomers, the SC is simply stellar. If I am buying one “frontside” ski that is going to see a lot of groomer duty, this is the one. Even though the 170cm is somewhat short, there is not even a hint of speed limit. I can crank out SL radius turns on it, or open it up and let it drift into GS arcs. I can do drills and releases from a dead stop. I can outrun anyone on the hill. There is not a ski out there with more speed range than the SC. Very impressive. I found that this ski has “positive feedback”. It will tell me when I screwed up (technically speaking) but not punish me; it is great tool for working to improve. For example, the first couple of days I skied the SC, something was off in my skiing (has been all year). I eventually realized I wasn't aggressive enough in down-unweighting at the end of the turn and pulling my feet back to absorb energy. The ski let me know that something was “off”, but never took me for a ride. After an afternoon of some slower speed skiing and skill building, I was loading and releasing the ski much more cleanly, flowing down the hill from turn to turn, loading the tip properly, moving my feet, and I was then getting feedback from the ski that I was really setting up the new turn much better. The ski rewards good skiing, but doesn't punish bad skiing. It will push you to make better turns. The more edge angle you can generate, the more fun you will have; at low edge angles, it is a great ski too. I actually had a guy stop me today and say “man, you are ripping, so fluid. I ski a lot here, what is your name? Never seen you before on the hill....” I told him it is because I hardly get time to ski anymore!

 

Bumps: not too stout. The tip handles brushed turns easily. It will swivel from edge to opposite edge if you are skiing steep competition-style bumps. The SC is one of the softer carvers I have taken into a bump run: it was quite pleasing here. The tail isn't all that soft; keep absorbing those bumps, get long after compressing, drive the feet forward, and the ski will love you for it. In the instances I did get back on the tail, I found forgiveness to be moderate, probably rate it a 6/10 here. Definitely acceptable as a bump ski and much better than a full race carver.

 

Off-piste: in 3-4 inches of windblown new snow, cream cheese snow, and cut-up cream cheese, this ski absolutely is the tool for the job. It is fairly narrow, so you need to let the ski drop though the new snow a bit, time the unweight release when the ski is bottoming, and boom, you have a fully weightless moment as you drive those tips back down and get long to start loading the ski again. It feels like you are a dolphin, arcing through the air, fully weightless, until you dive down again. Amazing. This ski has a fair amount of energy in it, but is so forgiving for a “carver” that you wouldn't know it is a carver without looking at the ski or the dimensions. Easily could be a do-everything frontside ride. I really got it loaded at speed, fairly big angles, and the release and flow from turn to turn was unreal. It is the kind of ski that you need to use the big energy it builds to release, to flow and set up the new turn. If you do that, the SC rewards you with superhero sensations, like you can do no wrong.

 

In relation to my title: here is why you should own this ski (or a ski that is very similar): it will make you a better skier. I had been skiing my Motive 95's most of this year, and I love that ski. But it does mask mistakes. I can get away with a bit of a “push off to release” in junk snow that won't fly on the SC. I don't need to move my feet as actively on the 95: in crud and new snow, I can stay more static and it will ski fine You may ask “Scott, why would I want a ski that makes me ski cleaner; why not just the easiest ski I can find for the conditions?”. That is a valid point: I won't be taking the SC into a foot of heavy cement either, too much work. With that said, in the 3-4” conditions I described, the SC will reward you in a way the 95 won't. That “push-off” move? It is a defensive move, and doesn't provide me with the clean release at the end of the turn, that “flow” that is the hallmark of dynamic skiing. Likewise, the fore-aft foot position can be static on the 95, whereas feet need to be active on the SC. The reward is more weightless float and better setup of the new turn with active feet. All good skiers use that move, but the 95 allows a skier (me) to cheat in a way that gets me through the turn, but in a non-dynamic way that doesn't take advantage of the forces developed in releasing out of the old turn. In short, I end up “fighting” the mountain, whereas I would rather dance with what it provides me. We have all seen people who “fight” the mountain with poor backseat skiing and defensive techniques: often people choose skis based on the fact that they can get away with skiing poorly on that ski. I don't want to fight the mountain: it is far less fun than executing the perfect “flow” that all true experts seem to possess, which is the holy grail of skiing. Also, resorting to “cheating” techniques won't help you when things get steep and sketchy, or you encounter a steep bump run. Clean, fluid skiing is the best way to tackle expert terrain. While I wouldn't recommend skiing an SC on really steep, gnarly terrain with funky snow, I do believe that skiing a ski such as the SC in moderately challenging snow builds technical skills, rewards dynamic and fluid skiing, keeps the skier honest about not developing “crutch” moves, provides relevant feedback, and provides more rewarding turns when a turn is executed properly. It's very hard to describe until you have felt that perfect turn unweighting, unloading, a weightless and balanced feel with energy redirected down the fall line, as you get onto the new edges, perfectly set up for the upcoming turn. It's like skippering a planing sailboat: otherworldly, like you are defying gravity. Developing those movement patterns is much harder on a wider ski that has lots of rocker and a huge sweet spot built into it; those that grew up in a race program probably will never develop those bad habits, no matter what ski they are on. For the rest of us, myself at least; I am keeping a narrower versatile ski in my quiver from now on. I am a better skier because of it.

 


Edited by dawgcatching - 3/6/16 at 10:44pm
post #2 of 29

Dawg - Great review!  Thanks.

 

Wondering if you could do a quick comparison to the 15-16 Supershape Speed?   Comparing things like forgiveness, stability, hold on ice, etc.

post #3 of 29

Me want.

post #4 of 29

Too bad you don't have shorter lengths.  I took a couple short runs on the Laser SC at the Whitetail Demo Day in early Jan.  Expected the 156cm to be too much for me at 5'0", 120 lbs, over 55, advanced but not aggressive.  Usually for carvers, 148-149 is the optimal length but the 156 was the shortest demo available.  Boy, was I surprised.  The SC was lots of fun!  They were the only skis I checked out that day that I asked about the price. :)

 

My coach at Massanutten loves his SC skis.  He's a very experienced PSIA Level 3 instructor.

post #5 of 29

dang!! - was saving for the AX now this! argh! 

post #6 of 29

Fischer RC4 works for me ;-)

post #7 of 29

Hey Dawg - PM sent. 

post #8 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by njdiver85 View Post
 

Dawg - Great review!  Thanks.

 

Wondering if you could do a quick comparison to the 15-16 Supershape Speed?   Comparing things like forgiveness, stability, hold on ice, etc.

I wish I could do a better comparison, it has been 2 years since I skied the Speed. 

 

I can say that the SC is loads more versatile.  The Speed was a groomer ski, a dedicated carver with a bit of a GS feel.  The SC is just as good as a carver, maybe better in terms of energy and overall flex and feel, but a great off-piste ski as well. It drifts, it skivots, it isn't a hurry to get onto edge.  That is why I like it so much: it is so much more than a "carver". The flex is really close to that of the AX: just narrower, and with a non tapered, non-early rise tip. As far as edgehold: it's tough, as I rarely ski "ice".  Stability? In 170cm, probably a wash. Forgiveness: again, tough to say; but the SC is very forgiving; there is a big sweet spot. The SC has more energy, no doubt, and much more range than the Speed, and better snow feel. It almost feels like it has "suspension" in comparison. 

 

I skied soft bumps on it for 2 hours today, and it really, really impressed me.  A friend and I were trading back between the SC and an SLX Waveflex from Elan in 170cm (slalom carver). The Elan was just a lot stiffer at the tip, a lot less forgiving if you stay direct fall line in the bumps.  It also was more likely to kick me around in crud at speed; the SC just floats over the same terrain, and is stable easily at 10mph more. It wants to go 10mph more, it is so comfortable that you just let the ski do it's thing.  The SC was so much easier to pilot through zipper line bumps due to the softer tip.  There just aren't many skis out there these days that have top-end carving and race like characteristics, yet can rip off-piste. The old Top Fuel from Nordica was such a ski.  The Kastle MX78 was another; various versions of Progressors have been, others were more groomer focused.   But those skis are now exceedingly rare, which is a shame. I love being able to attack a steep groomer as if I am in the gates, and then head over next run to steep bumps, and then cruddy off-piste trees the run after that, all while having a very capable ski on my feet and not wanting anything different. 


I really hope to see these type of "frontside" all-mountain/carver skis make a comeback.  Not a full on Fischer WC RC that is heavy with a plate, but something 97% of that ski on piste, yet a ski that can be skied all day, outside of heavy or scary snow where you want max float.  Next year, the new Fischer CURV DTX is along those lines too.  

post #9 of 29
Factory tune on a race ski is 1/1? Is that throughout the line?
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by smileguy1 View Post

Factory tune on a race ski is 1/1? Is that throughout the line?


I don't think it is a "race" ski.  That job would be for the SL,GS, etc.,  The SC is more a one step down from race Carving ski or if you preffer a "cheater".   That being said, I think the 1 1 tune has a lot to do with its characteristics; it might be a little less forgiving with a 0.5, 3 tune.   Still being softer than the Laser SX (as befits the smaller turn radius), it is probably the most forgiving stockly one-step down from race ski going.  I like 0.5, 3, but if your on the type of soft snow you get out west instead of the boiler plate we tend to get in Northern Ontario most of the time a less aggressive tune might be in order.

post #11 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by smileguy1 View Post

Factory tune on a race ski is 1/1? Is that throughout the line?

Yes, on the non-carver lineup.  They have impressive grip.  Exceeded the grip on a cheater SL I was testing from Blizzard, and that ski was at 1/2.  The 1/1 may make the ski more versatile too: out here, I don't need a sharper edge as we don't get full-on ice (although rain and then frozen concrete has been common this year: the 1/1 handles it fine).  I like the more overall feel of the 1/1 personally, as I spend 70% of my time off-piste, even on this ski.  I do want it to rip on groomers, however. 

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

Yes, on the non-carver lineup.  They have impressive grip.  Exceeded the grip on a cheater SL I was testing from Blizzard, and that ski was at 1/2.  The 1/1 may make the ski more versatile too: out here, I don't need a sharper edge as we don't get full-on ice (although rain and then frozen concrete has been common this year: the 1/1 handles it fine).  I like the more overall feel of the 1/1 personally, as I spend 70% of my time off-piste, even on this ski.  I do want it to rip on groomers, however. 

isn't the laser SC a club racer designed to use in SL and GS events? surprised by the 1/1.  though i'm not surprised by their versatility. I have a pair of the old 63mm underfoots in a 168 that I pull out once in a while to feel some serious G forces. But find they handle bumps and off piste extemely well. Sure that versatility has gotten even better over the years with the addition of width and new tech.

post #13 of 29

Hi Scott,

I wish I had your description skills ! I bought  Laser SC skis last year , and have had the same thrills skiing them as you describe . They are truly amazing in all respects . I make effortless turns with complete ease and control , which enables me to ski faster with great confidence . Of the many skis I have skied in my 85 years of skiing , the Laser SC is right at the top in all regards . Thanks for the great review .

post #14 of 29

... 85 years of skiing ?!?!!!

Cheers to your health and love of the sport !  :beercheer:

 

~ Andy

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfool91 View Post
 

Hi Scott,

I wish I had your description skills ! I bought  Laser SC skis last year , and have had the same thrills skiing them as you describe . They are truly amazing in all respects . I make effortless turns with complete ease and control , which enables me to ski faster with great confidence . Of the many skis I have skied in my 85 years of skiing , the Laser SC is right at the top in all regards . Thanks for the great review .

 

That's awesome!  I hope to hit 70+ years someday! 

post #16 of 29

Really nice review. Not just about the Laser SC, but about the passion of high performance skiing. I purchased the SC last season on a recommendation a couple of years ago. I have been so pleased with this purchase that Stocklis [Laser SL,SC,GS and AR]  have pushed almost everything else out of my quiver. Thanks for sharing! 

post #17 of 29

How differently does it ski vs. the 2013 Laser SC, which was also 72 mm wide and 14.9 m @ 170?   [That's the one I own.]

 

I understand the 2014 SC was essentially identical to that from 2013, except for the addition of a small amount of tip rocker, a rubber insert at the heel, a 1 mm decrease in heel width to maintain the same effective turning radius, and a change in the core from wood/fiberglass to just wood.   Not sure what changes they made between the 2014 and 2016 models.

post #18 of 29

I have no idea idea what other people are selling them for , but at $ 650.00 for that ski?

Nice job,,,,AS USUAL ,,,, Scott!!

post #19 of 29

Great review Dawg!

I spent a week skiing Stockli skis in France in Trois Valles, firm perfectly prepped groomers, mostly blue skies, off piste pretty scratchy with a few nicer patches. A few days we got in well over 30,000 vert with one day over 40,000. 

I went from the AX 183 to the SC in 177 and regularly ski a FIS Head RD SL, MX83, MX98, BMX115.

My short take is similar to Dawgs and I would happily own this ski or the SX which I hear is a bit more responsive and powerful. 

Standouts - Edge hold very good, top end speed limit is very high most wont ever hit it, you'll chicken out before this ski will show any nervousness. When skied well it generates a ton of speed and is notably one of the fastest skis I've ever spent time on.Ride is velvety smooth, with good edge feel and nice and easily controllable rebound energy. 

Off piste and in bumps its also quite good and forgiving. The tip and tail shape are a little less aggressive than many other carvers which along with a medium stiff flex it's a very versatile combo.

I would love to do a back to back with the Kastle RX12 in 176. My recollection is the RX12 is a bit more powerful and a touch more demanding than the SC. Edge grip is similar, snow feel I'd give the RX12 the edge. Bumps and off piste - I can't say as the conditions I tried both in were very different although I felt the RX12 was better everywhere than my beloved MX78 provided you skied it with some gusto.

 

The SC can be had flat or with the Salomon System binding to me I'd love to have a Race-plate (RDX, Speedflex 13) on that ski but same goes for the RX12. The demo plate system is fine but I think given the performance I'd pass on the demo setup on either ski. That demo system on the SC is hefty.

post #20 of 29

^^^^^^^ The binding/plate set up is an interesting question. IMHO, a ski like this needs careful consideration in order to pull the maximum enjoyment and performance out of it.

I have the Laser AX, SL,GS and SC. The AX and SL are set up with Marker Piston Plates, the SC and GS have Tyrolia equipment. I am a tall, heavy skier and find the Marker set up to be optimal in terms of adding stiffness/dampness. 

I am not saying that there is anything wrong with the Tyrolia equipment, it just changes the feel of the ski a bit. IMO it was the correct choice for my Laser SC, as it agrees with the flex pattern of the ski. The Laser SC is a more "playful" ski than the GS or SL. IMHO, the Laser AX benefits from the more stout approach as this is my all mountain ski. My Laser AX sees a good share of its time as a late day chop and spring ski.

post #21 of 29

John, agree about the binding/plate comment. IME, the Marker plate is pretty beefy (I'm tall and lighter), very damp, while the Tyrolia (assume you mean the carver plate) is almost neutral. Curious: Seems like some decent overlap in your gear. If the AX is your chop and softer snow ski, is the SC for firm days and the SL and GS for racing? Also curious about your opinion on VIST plates if you have used them. 

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

Stockli Laser SC 170cm: the ski everyone should own (or something similar)

 

Review: Stockli Laser SC 170cm, mounted with Attack 13 demo bindings  Gives me a bit of lift.  Mounted on the line.  Tune is factory, 1/1. 

 

Shameless plug: these are on closeout for $650 flat (163/170), but I love them even at full retail! Call for details, as they are special order items. 

 

www.dawgcatching.com

 

The ski: Stockli's Laser SC is a do-it-all frontside tool and carver. SC stands for “slalom carver” it is 72mm underfoot, 14.9m radius. The ski has a very interesting flex pattern: quite soft at the tip and tail, quite soft laterally at the tip as well (no stiffer than the Stormrider 95), and fairly stiff underfoot. On snow, this gives the skier a very progressive loading feel, predictable release, and energy on demand, without a mind of it's own.

 

Conditions: skied over 4 days. ½ groomers, ¼ bumps, ¼ buttery windpack and choppy snow off-piste. Groomers ranged from “hero” to soft granular with ice underneath.

 

Tune: out of the box. Very flat ski, tips and tails were detuned past the contact point from the factory. If anything, the edges weren't super sharp out of the wrapper, but they were good enough for this test: I didn't touch anything aside from waxing them well.

 

Construction: full laminate race-room layup. Typical Stockli: beautiful grind, perfectly flat out the wrapper. The ski has 2 sheets of metal, perforated; it skis light and doesn't feel stiff whatsoever. A very approachable ski, easily the most forgiving “carver” I have had the pleasure of owning.

 

On groomers, the SC is simply stellar. If I am buying one “frontside” ski that is going to see a lot of groomer duty, this is the one. Even though the 170cm is somewhat short, there is not even a hint of speed limit. I can crank out SL radius turns on it, or open it up and let it drift into GS arcs. I can do drills and releases from a dead stop. I can outrun anyone on the hill. There is not a ski out there with more speed range than the SC. Very impressive. I found that this ski has “positive feedback”. It will tell me when I screwed up (technically speaking) but not punish me; it is great tool for working to improve. For example, the first couple of days I skied the SC, something was off in my skiing (has been all year). I eventually realized I wasn't aggressive enough in down-unweighting at the end of the turn and pulling my feet back to absorb energy. The ski let me know that something was “off”, but never took me for a ride. After an afternoon of some slower speed skiing and skill building, I was loading and releasing the ski much more cleanly, flowing down the hill from turn to turn, loading the tip properly, moving my feet, and I was then getting feedback from the ski that I was really setting up the new turn much better. The ski rewards good skiing, but doesn't punish bad skiing. It will push you to make better turns. The more edge angle you can generate, the more fun you will have; at low edge angles, it is a great ski too. I actually had a guy stop me today and say “man, you are ripping, so fluid. I ski a lot here, what is your name? Never seen you before on the hill....” I told him it is because I hardly get time to ski anymore!

 

Bumps: not too stout. The tip handles brushed turns easily. It will swivel from edge to opposite edge if you are skiing steep competition-style bumps. The SC is one of the softer carvers I have taken into a bump run: it was quite pleasing here. The tail isn't all that soft; keep absorbing those bumps, get long after compressing, drive the feet forward, and the ski will love you for it. In the instances I did get back on the tail, I found forgiveness to be moderate, probably rate it a 6/10 here. Definitely acceptable as a bump ski and much better than a full race carver.

 

Off-piste: in 3-4 inches of windblown new snow, cream cheese snow, and cut-up cream cheese, this ski absolutely is the tool for the job. It is fairly narrow, so you need to let the ski drop though the new snow a bit, time the unweight release when the ski is bottoming, and boom, you have a fully weightless moment as you drive those tips back down and get long to start loading the ski again. It feels like you are a dolphin, arcing through the air, fully weightless, until you dive down again. Amazing. This ski has a fair amount of energy in it, but is so forgiving for a “carver” that you wouldn't know it is a carver without looking at the ski or the dimensions. Easily could be a do-everything frontside ride. I really got it loaded at speed, fairly big angles, and the release and flow from turn to turn was unreal. It is the kind of ski that you need to use the big energy it builds to release, to flow and set up the new turn. If you do that, the SC rewards you with superhero sensations, like you can do no wrong.

 

In relation to my title: here is why you should own this ski (or a ski that is very similar): it will make you a better skier. I had been skiing my Motive 95's most of this year, and I love that ski. But it does mask mistakes. I can get away with a bit of a “push off to release” in junk snow that won't fly on the SC. I don't need to move my feet as actively on the 95: in crud and new snow, I can stay more static and it will ski fine You may ask “Scott, why would I want a ski that makes me ski cleaner; why not just the easiest ski I can find for the conditions?”. That is a valid point: I won't be taking the SC into a foot of heavy cement either, too much work. With that said, in the 3-4” conditions I described, the SC will reward you in a way the 95 won't. That “push-off” move? It is a defensive move, and doesn't provide me with the clean release at the end of the turn, that “flow” that is the hallmark of dynamic skiing. Likewise, the fore-aft foot position can be static on the 95, whereas feet need to be active on the SC. The reward is more weightless float and better setup of the new turn with active feet. All good skiers use that move, but the 95 allows a skier (me) to cheat in a way that gets me through the turn, but in a non-dynamic way that doesn't take advantage of the forces developed in releasing out of the old turn. In short, I end up “fighting” the mountain, whereas I would rather dance with what it provides me. We have all seen people who “fight” the mountain with poor backseat skiing and defensive techniques: often people choose skis based on the fact that they can get away with skiing poorly on that ski. I don't want to fight the mountain: it is far less fun than executing the perfect “flow” that all true experts seem to possess, which is the holy grail of skiing. Also, resorting to “cheating” techniques won't help you when things get steep and sketchy, or you encounter a steep bump run. Clean, fluid skiing is the best way to tackle expert terrain. While I wouldn't recommend skiing an SC on really steep, gnarly terrain with funky snow, I do believe that skiing a ski such as the SC in moderately challenging snow builds technical skills, rewards dynamic and fluid skiing, keeps the skier honest about not developing “crutch” moves, provides relevant feedback, and provides more rewarding turns when a turn is executed properly. It's very hard to describe until you have felt that perfect turn unweighting, unloading, a weightless and balanced feel with energy redirected down the fall line, as you get onto the new edges, perfectly set up for the upcoming turn. It's like skippering a planing sailboat: otherworldly, like you are defying gravity. Developing those movement patterns is much harder on a wider ski that has lots of rocker and a huge sweet spot built into it; those that grew up in a race program probably will never develop those bad habits, no matter what ski they are on. For the rest of us, myself at least; I am keeping a narrower versatile ski in my quiver from now on. I am a better skier because of it.

 


WOW I have 210's i think they are World Cup.  I had 191's Stormrider.  I now have 175's Rotor.  Are the Laser all mountain or piste only

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by John B View Post

^^^^^^^ The binding/plate set up is an interesting question. IMHO, a ski like this needs careful consideration in order to pull the maximum enjoyment and performance out of it.
I have the Laser AX, SL,GS and SC. The AX and SL are set up with Marker Piston Plates, the SC and GS have Tyrolia equipment. I am a tall, heavy skier and find the Marker set up to be optimal in terms of adding stiffness/dampness. 
I am not saying that there is anything wrong with the Tyrolia equipment, it just changes the feel of the ski a bit. IMO it was the correct choice for my Laser SC, as it agrees with the flex pattern of the ski. The Laser SC is a more "playful" ski than the GS or SL. IMHO, the Laser AX benefits from the more stout approach as this is my all mountain ski. My Laser AX sees a good share of its time as a late day chop and spring ski.

Years ago I changed out the Nordica plates on a pr. of slaloms to Marker piston, to mellow them a bit.....there was a slight difference, not much, just enough to feel a little and that's about it. But that was on a little pogo stick of a ski. My AX's have Head plates and Fischer bindings. Those plates work fine on my Heads and Fischers, and I had them.
post #24 of 29

Am I supposed to be getting My Stokli Rotor center mounts re-drilled.........Oh God-I have a new underlined pair

post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post

Am I supposed to be getting My Stokli Rotor center mounts re-drilled.........Oh God-I have a new underlined pair
Your supposed to make sense.
post #26 of 29

S

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


Your supposed to make sense.


Sorry I meant underlined pair

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post


WOW I have 210's i think they are World Cup.  I had 191's Stormrider.  I now have 175's Rotor.  Are the Laser all mountain or piste only

Really?!? You quoted an entire detailed review that describes their performance on piste, in bumps, off piste? Maybe read it?
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post
 

S


Sorry I meant underlined pair


un-drilled not underlined-I have Stockli World Cup 210's does that make sense?  and also they are un-drilled and not underlined-does that make 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smileguy1 View Post


Really?!? You quoted an entire detailed review that describes their performance on piste, in bumps, off piste? Maybe read it?


Sorry

post #29 of 29

:popcorn:ROTF

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