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Warm Weather Wax

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
Hello,
Does anyone have a recommendation for a warm weather, hydro carbon, recreational ski wax? I will be in Utah (SLC) shortly, and I want to hot wax my skis, but the softest wax I have is CH8 (max. 40 degrees F). The weather forecast indicates mid 50s. Any thoughts or suggestions? Thank you.
post #2 of 39
Step 1 is to look at the structure on your skis and decide if it needs a refresh.
post #3 of 39
Thread Starter 
Yes, the structure is excellent and recent. The pattern is fairly "open" for warm(er) weather skiing.
post #4 of 39
Thread Starter 
So then what is step 2? Brush and hot wax with the CH8?
post #5 of 39

Depending on the type of snow it's transformed into, Dominator Butter can be your friend.  It's relatively inexpensive and easy to apply.

 

Something you want to always take into consideration when using warm weather wax is what type of snow it is and keep and eye on the overnight lows.  The air temp may hit a peak high in the 50's but what's the snow like in the AM and when will you be doing most of your skiing, early morning to noon or noon till close??  If you're waxed for warm weather and you ski in the morning and the snow has possibly setup overnight, that soft warm weather wax will make it feel like you're skiing on sandpaper.

 

If there was a countdown clock I'd start it because I'm sure our lovable furry little friend from the west coast, Jacques, will be along soon with a link to one of his DIY videos. lol

post #6 of 39
You can use CH10 wax for warmer days. A lot of vocal voices on this forum don't use Swix. I think what sib was asking is do your bases really need to be waxed?
post #7 of 39
Thread Starter 
The skis were just ground and have a nice open structure. I was planning to give them a couple of hot scrapes with a universal wax to clean the structure and then apply a CH7 or CH8. I'm not planning to travel with my iron and brushes so I'm trying to keep myself covered with as broad a range of temps and conditions as possible. Will this work?
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

The skis were just ground and have a nice open structure. I was planning to give them a couple of hot scrapes with a universal wax to clean the structure and then apply a CH7 or CH8. I'm not planning to travel with my iron and brushes so I'm trying to keep myself covered with as broad a range of temps and conditions as possible. Will this work?

If the ski has just been stone ground it has no wax in it at all so I'd get at least two wax/scrape/brush cycles with 8 on your skis and a couple wax/scrape/brush cycles with Swix MB77 or a couple cycles with Dominator base renew and a couple cycles with Dominator Zoom w/graphite.

 

And if you really wanted to go all out you could get some Swix Marathon and do a finish coat with that.  It's a HF top coat that covers a really wide temp range and works well in sheetie spring time type snow that can change rapidly throughout the day.

post #9 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks MoJo. So if I put down a few hot scrapes with the CH8, can I finish with the CH7 and feel comfortable that I'll be reasonably well prepared? Remember, this is recreational skiing. Thanks again.
post #10 of 39
Thread Starter 
I would prefer not to use any flouro wax.
post #11 of 39
What I've generally find is that warm wax, universal wax, stuff with graphite, yada yada, don't make anywhere near the difference that a good clean structure does. That being said, I seem to have found (can't believe it) the solution to that grabby snow that stops you like you suddenly hit a rubber mat. I've been crayoning on Racewax's universal fluoro, then dribbling lots of their red wax all over that and ironing it all together. Scrape and brush thoroughly. I personally have never liked fluoro, because you need to get it off before it gets cold again. But have been alternating a treatment with that stuff between just hydro each time I do the skis and am now sort of looking for that grabby stuff to see if it's really fixed or just a fluke. Either our snow is cured past the grabby phase or I've been lucky. Can't believe after ten years I found the fix. @Fuller will tell you my glide is amazing.
post #12 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

Thanks MoJo. So if I put down a few hot scrapes with the CH8, can I finish with the CH7 and feel comfortable that I'll be reasonably well prepared? Remember, this is recreational skiing. Thanks again.

Maybe I'm confused here but when you say "a few hot scrapes" do you mean just doing a hot scrape to clean the ski or is that what you call doing a hot wax, let it cool, scrape then brush cycle?

 

If you mean just a hot scrape to clean the ski, I'm not a big fan of hot scraping so one time would be all I'd do.  Then I'd try and saturate those bases with a few wax, cool, scrape, brush, cycles with a base prep wax.  Then finish with one, two would be better, MB77 waxing cycles.  Swix MB77 is a great everyday wax in that temp range and doesn't cost a lot.  For the conditions you're describing I think it would be a much better choice than either of the other two. I think you can get a 90gr bar for around $30  

 

If you just want to stick with your CH8 and CH7, get as much wax into the ski through the waxing cycles as you can and call it good.  Dominator Zoom w/Graphite would also be a good choice if you're against fluoro's.

 

Remember, good gliding skis isn't only reserved for racers.  Sticky skis, suck, no matter what level skier you are.

post #13 of 39
Thread Starter 
Good thoughts from you both. Thank you!
post #14 of 39

mountain temp is not the same as slc temp and isn't going to be 50degrees. And snow temp is not going to be same as air temp.

 

Don't go out and buy something special.   It's going to depend most upon your structure.  Just use your ch8, brush and call it good.  

post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

Hello,
Does anyone have a recommendation for a warm weather, hydro carbon, recreational ski wax? I will be in Utah (SLC) shortly, and I want to hot wax my skis, but the softest wax I have is CH8 (max. 40 degrees F). The weather forecast indicates mid 50s. Any thoughts or suggestions? Thank you.


That wax should be fine.  "If you could add some HF8 with that, that would be great."  :drool

post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 

Depending on the type of snow it's transformed into, Dominator Butter can be your friend.  It's relatively inexpensive and easy to apply.

 

Something you want to always take into consideration when using warm weather wax is what type of snow it is and keep and eye on the overnight lows.  The air temp may hit a peak high in the 50's but what's the snow like in the AM and when will you be doing most of your skiing, early morning to noon or noon till close??  If you're waxed for warm weather and you ski in the morning and the snow has possibly setup overnight, that soft warm weather wax will make it feel like you're skiing on sandpaper.

 

If there was a countdown clock I'd start it because I'm sure our lovable furry little friend from the west coast, Jacques, will be along soon with a link to one of his DIY videos. lol


Ha ha you so funny.  Is this what you are looking for! 

post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

The skis were just ground and have a nice open structure. I was planning to give them a couple of hot scrapes with a universal wax to clean the structure and then apply a CH7 or CH8. I'm not planning to travel with my iron and brushes so I'm trying to keep myself covered with as broad a range of temps and conditions as possible. Will this work?


Sure it will work, but even the best choice given certain conditions will get slower and sticky.  There is no golden ticket!

post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

I would prefer not to use any flouro wax.


Don't be afraid of fluorocarbon waxes.  Don't overheat the iron.  Swix HF & LF waxes won't kill you.  It's stuff like Super Cera that will kill you, but you don't need that stuff!

post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoJo23 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

Thanks MoJo. So if I put down a few hot scrapes with the CH8, can I finish with the CH7 and feel comfortable that I'll be reasonably well prepared? Remember, this is recreational skiing. Thanks again.

Maybe I'm confused here but when you say "a few hot scrapes" do you mean just doing a hot scrape to clean the ski or is that what you call doing a hot wax, let it cool, scrape then brush cycle?

 

If you mean just a hot scrape to clean the ski, I'm not a big fan of hot scraping so one time would be all I'd do.  Then I'd try and saturate those bases with a few wax, cool, scrape, brush, cycles with a base prep wax.  Then finish with one, two would be better, MB77 waxing cycles.  Swix MB77 is a great everyday wax in that temp range and doesn't cost a lot.  For the conditions you're describing I think it would be a much better choice than either of the other two. I think you can get a 90gr bar for around $30  

 

If you just want to stick with your CH8 and CH7, get as much wax into the ski through the waxing cycles as you can and call it good.  Dominator Zoom w/Graphite would also be a good choice if you're against fluoro's.

 

Remember, good gliding skis isn't only reserved for racers.  Sticky skis, suck, no matter what level skier you are.


Well, I gotta' say for wet snow graphite is not you best choice.  For wet snow fluorocarbon wax without graphite will be superior.  Graphite is not hydrophobic.  The fluoro-graphite polymer found in Dominator Race Zoom Old Snow and SRB line of waxes are hydrophobic, but are quite costly. 
I use them because they work.  A chunk of SRB 32 last me a long time.  Here is how I use it.  Same as mixing any two waxes such as CH8 and HF8

Then again you can just use Hyper Zoom. It is good and simple for wetter snow.
 

post #20 of 39

Hertel Super Hot Sauce universal wax works very well for me in all conditions.  I know, finding just the right wax is always better, but not that much better for me.  Your mileage will certainly vary.

post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 
Many thanks, Jacques, Ray, and Softsnow. I really appreciate your help! I'll hot wax, scrape, brush with a base prep first (the skis were ground recently) and then do the same with the CH8. Since I'm leaving in a few days, I don't have time to order and apply the other (and perhaps better) waxes.
post #22 of 39
Thread Starter 
And... I don't think I'll be skiing in wet snow. Probably more like heavy snow with warmer-than-usual air temp. And, if what I have on my bases is totally wrong, I can always take the skis to a shop for a quick wax near the resort.
post #23 of 39

We use a Universal Warm Swix wax for temps above 28 degrees. Its the cloudy white looking one.

post #24 of 39

For rec use no need to overthink the wax.

 

Error on colder is better than using too warm a wax.

 

CH8 is fine (you can run CH6/7 by the edges if you want as well), but is a pretty soft wax so doesn't do very well for abrasive snow.

post #25 of 39
Forgot to add, sometimes it's not just the wax but also how well you brush it out.
If you don't brush well and wax sits in the structure, you're going to get a more pronounced suction effect for sure.

Chances are (unless you used to prep a lot of race skis) you aren't brushing enough.
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbear View Post

Forgot to add, sometimes it's not just the wax but also how well you brush it out.
If you don't brush well and wax sits in the structure, you're going to get a more pronounced suction effect for sure.

Chances are (unless you used to prep a lot of race skis) you aren't brushing enough.


Bump and I second the above and raise you another video.

post #27 of 39
Thread Starter 
So, Jacques: if you had to choose between a bronze brush or a brass brush for recreational skiing under most conditions which one would you choose? Thanks!
Michael
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

So, Jacques: if you had to choose between a bronze brush or a brass brush for recreational skiing under most conditions which one would you choose? Thanks!
Michael


Brass.  Brass usually has the finest bristles.

post #29 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Jacques. Always good to have your advice!
Michael
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF View Post

Thanks, Jacques. Always good to have your advice!
Michael


Your welcome.  A brass brush is fine for post wax removal.  Cleans the structure out well.  Be more aggressive with it pre-wax as far as how many strokes and passes.

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