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Rossignol Super 7 or Rossignol Soul 7 - Help me decide on a 2 ski quiver for Mammoth

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

I’m 35 years old, have been skiing since I was a teenage but didn’t get a chance to ski during my 20’s.  After moving to Florida and picking up surfing I forgot how much I loved skiing and fell back in love with the sport.  This season I will ski about 20 days, but the first of April I’m buying a Cali4nia season pass for 2016/17, so will get to ski much more often.  I’m a level 7 skier and live in California, LA and ski Mammoth, Snow Summit and Big Bear mostly.  I am 6’2” 195lbs, an adrenaline junkie and love to challenge myself.

 

Last year skied only about 6 days, nothing like this season or next.  Found that I picked it right back up and could hit the blacks just like my youth.  I make sure to take a lesson or two ever season to improve my skills.  I’m taking an advanced/expert lesson on Monday at Mammoth as I'm always looking to improve.  With being out west now and getting lots of powder this year I am skiing more and more off groomers and loving it.

 

I’m looking for a second wider powder ski for Mammoth to add to my 2016 Nordica NRGY 90 185.

 

I have narrowed it down to the Rossignol Super 7 188 or Rossignol Soul 7 188.  With my NRGY 90’s I was thinking the Super 7 that is 116 might be a better fit for me in the powder and trees over the Soul 7 106.  I would love to hear your thoughts and experiences.

 

I'm hoping to demo both and getting custom fitted boots at Footloose on Sunday.

 

 

Thanks for your help!

 

Dave

post #2 of 21

Go wide.

post #3 of 21

Mammoth's snow isn't deep, it's wind buffed...beautiful delicious windbuff. 

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfilms View Post
 

 

I have narrowed it down to the Rossignol Super 7 188 or Rossignol Soul 7 188.

I see a lot of people using the Soul 7. Although, to be honest, I don't know what the Super 7 looks like so maybe a lot of people are using it too :cool

 

By the way, test drive ANY Ford and you get a FREE mid week Mammoth, June, Big Bear lift ticket good to the end of the year. I got mine yesterday and I'm planning another trip in March to Mammoth :)

post #5 of 21

Out of those two, I'd do the Super.

 

I spend quite a bit of time on the Praxis GPO - which has similar dimensions to the Super - and I'd personally consider that more a middle size than the wide/powder end of a quiver in any of the west/coastal mountain ski areas that get major snow. I would certainly go no narrower for the stated purpose.  Especially at close to 200 pounds.

 

IMO that size and shape of ski kills it in wind buff too. 

post #6 of 21

How torsionally stiff is the Super ?

 

You want a ski that will handle powder but not give it up when you lay it over on edge in the heavy/tough snow.

 

I like the Volkl Shiro.

 

Oh Yea, contact Philpug, and see what he has for deals. You can trust him...he used to be a car salesman...;)

 

Really he wouldn't "steer" you wrong.

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

What other skis should I be looking at for this category to be used in Mammoth's wind buffed snow?  I was looking at the Nordica Patron's & Rossignol Super 7's.  Love to here your thoughts and suggestions.  Thanks for everyone's input.  Dave

post #8 of 21

I gave you the Volkl Shiro. Google it and read the reviews.

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 

Any thoughts on any of these for a 2nd Mammoth wind buffed powder ski:

 

 

Blizzard Gunsmoke

Billy Goats

Rossignol Super 7

Nordica Patron

Volkl Shiro

 

 

Thanks,

Dave

post #10 of 21

I googled the Super 7, found this in a review on blister.

 

"The 195 Super 7s have two layers of titanal to stiffen the ski slightly while also adding more energy to the ski. The 195’s offer a bit fatter dimensions and a little less taper through the tail compared to the 188 as well. This ski would cater to the deep pow and the charging-through-crud side of my skiing, while the standard non-metal baring 188 S7, being tighter-turning and lighter, would cater to the tight trees and jibby end of the spectrum. At that point, BAM, out comes the new for 2012 188 Super 7. Rossignol throws in the dual layers of titanal, just like the big 195, but keeps the shape identical to the regular S7. My decision suddenly feels easy and I throw down all my saved up cash for a pair of the 188 Super 7s – and some P14’s."

 

 

That's just a short piece of the 4 page review, Just read a little more on page 3 and he's not to happy with them.

 

"From that day forward, my love of the Super 7 went only one direction: downhill. I skied a couple more days on some excellent packed powder conditions at Alta before the next huge storm rolled in. It was then that I started to notice the extremely low speed limit of the skis. Basically, the only place the skis felt stable enough to really let fly was on groomers. To my disappointment, the tip taper of these skis acted exactly the same as the skis I had been on before: in any amount of crud or crust, if I rolled the ski up high on edge they would start darting out from under my body. (And this even happened on soft groomers when I’d throw the skis out to a super high edge.)"

 

IMO most us want a fat ski with metal unless you have you already have another powder ski with out for true powder day's. For most if us we need a ski that will ski powder and crud.

 

Having skied wind blown snow, your going to want a ski with metal.

post #11 of 21

if you're not the kind that can 'pick out of a hat' and go with it...  demo when the fluff is freshie...

if you want 18" of fresh to ski like 4" then go wide, if you prefer to be down 'in it', then go as narrow as you dare...

personally being knee+ deep in it is my idea of great speed control  :D  and mammoth almost never has it soo light that being too deep becomes an issue.

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

I googled the Super 7, found this in a review on blister.

 

"The 195 Super 7s have two layers of titanal to stiffen the ski slightly while also adding more energy to the ski. The 195’s offer a bit fatter dimensions and a little less taper through the tail compared to the 188 as well. This ski would cater to the deep pow and the charging-through-crud side of my skiing, while the standard non-metal baring 188 S7, being tighter-turning and lighter, would cater to the tight trees and jibby end of the spectrum. At that point, BAM, out comes the new for 2012 188 Super 7. Rossignol throws in the dual layers of titanal, just like the big 195, but keeps the shape identical to the regular S7. My decision suddenly feels easy and I throw down all my saved up cash for a pair of the 188 Super 7s – and some P14’s."

 

 

That's just a short piece of the 4 page review, Just read a little more on page 3 and he's not to happy with them.

 

"From that day forward, my love of the Super 7 went only one direction: downhill. I skied a couple more days on some excellent packed powder conditions at Alta before the next huge storm rolled in. It was then that I started to notice the extremely low speed limit of the skis. Basically, the only place the skis felt stable enough to really let fly was on groomers. To my disappointment, the tip taper of these skis acted exactly the same as the skis I had been on before: in any amount of crud or crust, if I rolled the ski up high on edge they would start darting out from under my body. (And this even happened on soft groomers when I’d throw the skis out to a super high edge.)"

 

IMO most us want a fat ski with metal unless you have you already have another powder ski with out for true powder day's. For most if us we need a ski that will ski powder and crud.

 

Having skied wind blown snow, your going to want a ski with metal.

Not necessarily. A ski does not need metal to have favorable characteristics in wind blown. Just like a ski does not need metal to be damp. You are engaging in old paradigm's.

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
 

Not necessarily. A ski does not need metal to have favorable characteristics in wind blown. Just like a ski does not need metal to be damp. You are engaging in old paradigm's.


Yea, your right some of the fat skis don't have metal and do well. Lets try this, they need to be torsionally stiff

post #14 of 21

Hey Dave, i,m 53 and have skied mammoth my whole life. Because windblown is , in my opinion the easiest to ski of any condition and mammoth is famous for it, it doesn't really matter what kind of ski your on. You picking a Rossignol though is a great start.I think at your weight if you control your speed with turns the Super would be fine .

If you like to go fast, go with the squad.Like alot of people you'll probably be spending alot of time at the top and 2/3rds of that terrain is going to be wind effected even with fresh snow and at your size you will want the more sturdier 7.

Most people that have a 90 waisted ski like you will ski  that 90  5 1/2 to 6 days out of a normal mammoth storm cycle because you just don't sink that much and the wind just keeps delivering.

Myself I use a 70 ( I like bumps ) and a twin tip 110 but your heavier than me.

Good luck!

post #15 of 21
I think you can do better than a soul 7. Every time I am on that ski, it falls apart in chop and crud. I can get the same ease of use, with much better snow feel and top end, in a storm rider 107 from stockli. A Ranger 108 is quicker, more forgiving, with better float and more top end. A BMX105 is just as playful whole blasting crud around 300 % better, and ripping groomers is more energetic and balanced too.

It always seemed like a Soul 7 was for the skier who skids around, likes a dull feeling ski that offers little for feedback or tip engagement. It's popular with our mountain ambassadors, mostly retired folks who show people how to get back to the base. Nothing wrong with that, if that describes you. I suppose it's the modern day Camry. I know good skiers who liked it, till they got into challenging snow and it fell apart. Wind pack? At speed? No thanks, the 7 will fold like a WalMart tent

I am a huge fan of the Exp88; rossi makes some good skis. This one is a crowd pleaser, but not for me.
post #16 of 21
You can always size up on a narrower ski that isn't stiff. Length for wind pack is hugely important. Ski it all the time at bachelor, I love the Stormrider95 in 183 on those days. Surf, soft tip, 2 sheets of metal. ON3P tychoon is very good too
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post
 

Out of those two, I'd do the Super.

 

I spend quite a bit of time on the Praxis GPO - which has similar dimensions to the Super - and I'd personally consider that more a middle size than the wide/powder end of a quiver in any of the west/coastal mountain ski areas that get major snow. I would certainly go no narrower for the stated purpose.  Especially at close to 200 pounds.

 

IMO that size and shape of ski kills it in wind buff too. 

Agree 100%.  I demoed both a few years ago and especially on a powder day greatly preferred the Super 7.  The Soul felt more skittish and less stable to me.  I chose the Praxis GPO also because I liked the general shape and size of the Super 7, but wanted something that has a little more stability and harder snow ability also.  I love the GPO as a basically anything soft or fresh snow ski, not just a powder ski.  I combine it with a 98mm underfoot Nordica Hell and Back as a great 2 ski quiver.  The Soul 7 would do better as a 1 ski quiver.

post #18 of 21
I'm a bit confused about why Max would be quoting a 2012 review when the design of the Super 7 completely changed after that. FWIW, I skied the old Super 7, owned the S7, and own the new Super 7. The new one, even with carbon instead of metal, is smoother, more predictable, has a much better rocker curve, and IMO is a far better ski than either its ancestor or the Soul 7. No it's not a high speed smasher - and for many here that's the sine qua non for any ski - nor is it especially happy on firm snow; it's a powder ski. And IMO it's the best fat powder ski I've ever been on, including several DPS models, for variable soft snow conditions in tighter spaces like trees, bumps, and narrow chutes. Mainly, it's fun for a wide range of abilities. A quality that seems to be low on many lists because we're looking for shock and awe models that reduce crud to whimpering surrender.
Edited by beyond - 2/28/16 at 7:56pm
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 

I settled on a pair of 2016 Dynastar Cham 117 190s. Haven't had a chance to try them out yet but can't wait for some April storms up at Mammoth.

 

 

post #20 of 21

I think that is a good choice. Mammoth does occasionally  get deep light snow so the 117cm Chams will be good for that and also they will keep you off the bottom when the fresh snow isn't deep enough. Your 90mm skis will be great for everything else. 

Party on.

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

I think you can do better than a soul 7. Every time I am on that ski, it falls apart in chop and crud. I can get the same ease of use, with much better snow feel and top end, in a storm rider 107 from stockli. A Ranger 108 is quicker, more forgiving, with better float and more top end. A BMX105 is just as playful whole blasting crud around 300 % better, and ripping groomers is more energetic and balanced too.

It always seemed like a Soul 7 was for the skier who skids around, likes a dull feeling ski that offers little for feedback or tip engagement. It's popular with our mountain ambassadors, mostly retired folks who show people how to get back to the base. Nothing wrong with that, if that describes you. I suppose it's the modern day Camry. I know good skiers who liked it, till they got into challenging snow and it fell apart. Wind pack? At speed? No thanks, the 7 will fold like a WalMart tent

I am a huge fan of the Exp88; rossi makes some good skis. This one is a crowd pleaser, but not for me.

 

Have you had a chance to try the '17 Super 7 and Soul 7 yet? I'm looking into those. Curious to hear how they've changed with the minor materials updates.

 

Coming off the Head RnR which I really enjoyed a lot (versatile, light, easy, pretty floaty but could still carve). 

 

The RnR was 95 underfoot, and basically I'm looking at the Soul or Super as a wider similar feeling ski with better float in fresh stuff. It'll be my 1SQ, whatever I end up with. 

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