or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Women's natural alignment and joint stress
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Women's natural alignment and joint stress

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
Someone commented recently (can't recall who) that women are subject to experiencing more knee and joint problems due to their physiology (increased q angle, wide hips). I believe the premise is that when a leg is out of alignment, forces act through the outside of a joint rather than the centre, creating stresses and potentially leading to tissue damage.

Is this concept true for some, many, or nearly all women?

How do symptoms manifest? Obviously the affected women will experience pain or soreness, but are there external cues we can see?

Are there any technique interventions we can offer affected individuals short of skiing at lower performance levels?

Are there bootfitter, physiotherapeutic, or other interventions to proactively prevent these issues?

(Edit: prevent, not percent! Thanks, auto correct. rolleyes.gif)
Edited by Metaphor_ - 2/26/16 at 12:42pm
post #2 of 3
You cannot cure a big q angle. At best you can adjust the boots and work out to keep the knees and pelvis strong. My youngest cannot stand touching her ankles together and it has led to many knee problems. She skis at a very high level in spite of that abnormality though. Off the snow always give her more problems as her knees just track funny.
A couple ideas for young girls would be posture and spinal curve management as well as no sitting in a W position.
But in the end genetics plays the biggest role and nothing can change that. Chad might have more insight into corrective actions.
post #3 of 3

Women have more knee injuries than men. However, a recent thesis on alpine knee injuries did not see any correlation between knee/ankle angles and alpine knee injuries. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Women's natural alignment and joint stress