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When is a ski too worn out to resell?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I have a few old pairs of skis I'd like to sell (2-5 years old). They still have plenty of edge and base left. They've definitely lost some pop, but aren't noodles. I assume it's ethical to sell them.

But it made me think: at what point is a ski too worn to ethically sell it? E.g. I would probably be furious if i bought a head titan at a ski swap and discovered it was already dead. Yet for a true beginner or even a low intermediate, a dead ski is skiable (but really should be sold very cheaply). What are your thoughts?
post #2 of 9

If its so old that no shop will touch the bindings, I'd probably not sell it.  Otherwise slap a $50 price tag on it it and see if someone buys it.

post #3 of 9

Honesty is the best policy.  Always.  

Good description of positives (edges and bases) and specifics of use (pics of skis and number of days' use) plus realistic price should alert almost anyone.  

 

I have enough reasons not to sleep well at night; I don't need any more self-made moral anxieties.


Edited by tch - 2/24/16 at 6:37pm
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Duh, stating usage removes any responsibility from the seller. Thanks!
post #5 of 9

I've always donated skis that no longer have enough life in them for me.

 

They might not give the new owner quite as rewarding an experience, but I feel good knowing that the skis will likely be bought by someone who may not have the means to buy newer skis otherwise, and for that person, skiing on relatively worn gear is better than not skiing.

 

If I'd still ski them but am simply adjusting my quiver, I'll sell them. 

post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Duh, stating usage removes any responsibility from the seller. Thanks!

Just a quick note: of course, Duh.  But it's not about removing responsibility.  I meant that a ski with 30 days on it is different than a ski with 60 days on it is different than a ski with 90 days, etc.  

 

Give the seller a pretty good sense of how used these skis are, and...perhaps if you're feeling really honest, explain who might be the target audience.  

 

As for when it's too worn....that all depends.  I'm right now thinking about selling or donating my wife's old skis: Nordica Victory's.  They don't have a lot of use on them and they're still plenty lively -- but they're from 2009-10, and not current with recent ski design (they have no tip rise at all and are stiffly cambered).  Ironically, you'd have to be a pretty good skier to really want/appreciate them.  But a good skier would already have newer skis.  So who's the market audience?  

post #7 of 9

If I'm not willing to ski them because they are too tired,  the skis and bindings should probably be retired.  (Unless the bindings are Rossi /Look Pivots etc ;-)

 

The ski should be able to live up to it's "type" regardless who might be next in line for them.  "Selling" a lifeless ski hurts everyone.  I've got no objection for the $50 "give away" to anyone though.  That's what school ski and skate sales are all about.  Gift the ski and take the write off!  ;-)

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

Just a quick note: of course, Duh.  But it's not about removing responsibility.  I meant that a ski with 30 days on it is different than a ski with 60 days on it is different than a ski with 90 days, etc.  

 

Give the seller a pretty good sense of how used these skis are, and...perhaps if you're feeling really honest, explain who might be the target audience.  

 

As for when it's too worn....that all depends.  I'm right now thinking about selling or donating my wife's old skis: Nordica Victory's.  They don't have a lot of use on them and they're still plenty lively -- but they're from 2009-10, and not current with recent ski design (they have no tip rise at all and are stiffly cambered).  Ironically, you'd have to be a pretty good skier to really want/appreciate them.  But a good skier would already have newer skis.  So who's the market audience?  

 

It removes responsibility from me for having to make judgment calls on whether or not it's an OK ski for a given skier. :o My intent is to help and at the same time get rid of some stuff I'm no longer using. The last thing I want is for someone to feel ripped off. 

 

Your wife's Nordica Victory skis are like my 2010 Dynastar Contact Cross. It's a reasonably stiff recreational carver which I might have skied 15 days on, but anyone with the skill to get the most out of them has newer skis. Maybe I'll just gift them to a friend. 

post #9 of 9
My Bonafides have almost 200 days under their p-tex.
The top sheets are cherry edges are fat and the sintered bases remain thick, they've had maybe 3 full tunes in 3 years.

With a reputation for demanding a firm input, these bones are a docile smeary off piste weapon, groomer weekend warriors need not apply.

I'm thinking a lighter skier on a budget will provide a fine new home for these while I replace with the new version.
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