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Park City Question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I was just in Park City at the beginning of Feb for a 4 days of skiing/boarding.  Couldn't have timed it better.  2 days of fresh snow (9"+) and 2 days of sun.

 

While there we did the hike up Murdock Peak.  I was trying to determine how much vertical you gain on the climb from the top of Super Condor to the top of the peak.  

 

Anyone know?  

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks in advance,

John

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannsj View Post
 

...we did the hike up Murdock Peak.  I was trying to determine how much vertical you gain on the climb from the top of Super Condor to the top of the peak.  

 

Anyone know?

 

According to last year's Canyons Resort trail map, the rise would be 602 feet, not a bad hike.

post #3 of 8

double black? That looks like a blue at Snowbird....

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the answer

By the way, the tracks in the photo are from folks who bailed part way through the hike. Although I would agree that it was not all that steep - even if it did feel that way on the way up :-)
post #5 of 8

I don't know if this is actually the hiking route, but here's a Hillmap path/profile of the top of Super Condor to the peak :

 

 

 

And the Five Trees bowl near the top seems to top out at about 37 degrees - pretty steep.

post #6 of 8

It's tough to take a photo looking down the slope that accurately reflects the steepness of a trail. I'm always a little disappointed about that because, when I look at my own photos, I also remember the butterflies in my stomach when I took them. I remind myself that I need to take a photo looking across the trail once I'm down in it... but I'm always more interested in skiing (and in some cases staying upright) at that point!

 

Here's a video-capture of the National drop-in at Stowe (which I took a few weeks ago). It looks like a typical blue, but the average slope is 32.9% (assuming you trust Google Earth's elevation numbers).

 

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tactical Speed View Post
 

It's tough to take a photo looking down the slope that accurately reflects the steepness of a trail. I'm always a little disappointed about that because, when I look at my own photos, I also remember the butterflies in my stomach when I took them. I remind myself that I need to take a photo looking across the trail once I'm down in it... but I'm always more interested in skiing (and in some cases staying upright) at that point!

 

Here's a video-capture of the National drop-in at Stowe (which I took a few weeks ago). It looks like a typical blue, but the average slope is 32.9% (assuming you trust Google Earth's elevation numbers).

 

For accuracy's sake, National Drop-in is a different trail, which is behind you from where you're taking that picture. What you're looking at there is the National headwall, which yes, is steep. And usually covered in glare ice. Most people take the S-53 around the headwall because it's hardly worth skiing usually. 

post #8 of 8

Good catch freeski. Thanks for the clarification. I double checked my numbers and they still hold up.

 

I didn't mention the ice because that's yet another element the photo does no justice. It was very icy this particular day, but it looks like packed powder in the photo. Just as you mentioned, I skied down to Liftline and took that one instead.

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