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Hate my Blizzard Bonafides. Tuning or new skis?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm 5'11 ~195lbs. 180 Bonafides bought new. They have factory tune and wax, and I have about 20 days on them.

 

They are amazing in ice, but horrible in everything else. I have skied many other skis and don't have this issue.

 

These skis are impossible to pivot, side slide, or smear. They carve very well, but I can't dump speed in the rocky or steep trees. To give you an other idea, I can ski almost all double blacks at Snowbird and Jackson Hole without an issue with my OTHER skis; however, with these Bonafides, I'm at max an easy single black guy. Its very infuriating. I have no brakes only long carve. They are also garbage in the moguls.

 

I was thinking of going with something like a 1.5/2 or 2/2 bevel tune. Would this potentially help, or make the ski unsaleable?

 

Provided I don't need a speed limit,  this ski does amazing, but I find it at most an intermediate ski, or a ski made for Olympic Moguls.

 

Thank you,

Chris

post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix27101 View Post

I'm 5'11 ~195lbs. 180 Bonafides bought new. They have factory tune and wax, and I have about 20 days on them.

 

They are amazing in ice, but horrible in everything else. I have skied many other skis and don't have this issue.

 

These skis are impossible to pivot, side slide, or smear. They carve very well, but I can't dump speed in the rocky or steep trees. To give you an other idea, I can ski almost all double blacks at Snowbird and Jackson Hole without an issue with my OTHER skis; however, with these Bonafides, I'm at max an easy single black guy. Its very infuriating. I have no brakes only long carve. They are also garbage in the moguls.

 

I was thinking of going with something like a 1.5/2 or 2/2 bevel tune. Would this potentially help, or make the ski unsaleable?

 

Provided I don't need a speed limit,  this ski does amazing, but I find it at most an intermediate ski, or a ski made for Olympic Moguls.

 

Thank you,

Chris

 

They are a very popular ski and I borrowed my son's pair (same length as yours) for a couple days recently and enjoyed them on admittedly perfect packed and loose powder conditions in Aspen. They seemed pretty ideal for western all mtn ski. Don't give up on them. I'll bet they grow on you. You could experiment with the tune, or just ski it away with a couple days of heavy use. If you decide to sell them, I'm sure you could move them quickly.
post #3 of 16

Give them a 1 deg base bevel and a 3 deg side bevel. This works for all skis unless you go in the park. Anyone who tells you different is just plain wrong. Others may prefer different numbers, but these work. Your 2 deg base bevel is too much.

 

Your skis sound like your edges are high and / or your ptex is low or concave. Another term used for it is railed. The solution is to file your edges flat to you bases and maybe bring both edge and base down till flat at least in the outer 3rds.  Take them to a shop that tunes race skis and have them evaluate and suggest what is needed. You should be able to pivot a Bonafide easily.

 

I will repeat what I said in another post that applies here too.

 

Every single time I have issues with a ski, it has been the tune. And by issues I mean the ski is doing something a ski is not supposed to do. I don't mean it has a so so grip on ice, I mean it has NO grip on ice. Every ski is a little different in feel and performance, but a ski is still a ski (as long as we are talking about alpine with metal edges) and they all perform similar at some level.

 

With age, I have learned to think its the tune, its not me. I have it tuned before I make a poor judgement. This has turned skis I hated into my favorite pair. If you are on hardpack snow, you are skiing the tune, not the ski. Words to live by.  If you are in soft packed powder, or deep powder, then its not true. You are skiing the ski shape, not the tune, and in deep powder it probably is you and not the ski 

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 

If you don't mind me asking, what kind of runs did you do on them? Were any of them steep moguls or trees?


The reason I ask is because this ski has a lot of great reviews; everyone seems to say good things about them, but they can't talking about the same skis! I can't find one youtube video of someone putting them down a chute or though trees. In fact, the only thing I have ever seen people do both in person or on video is hall ass though easy-ish groomers.

post #5 of 16

My son and I are your exact size, and we have both skied it in a 187cm since the ski was a prototype. He was on his pair #4 in the summer, and I'm on my pair #3. My daughter skis it in a 180cm, and is on her second pair. They're both former high end racers, in their late 20's. I have a pretty extensive background, and I'm still skiing as well as ever at 61. 

 

I ski mine as my go-to during my 20 or so days in CO, and I ski a pair when it's fresh snow, and whatever we call powder in the Northeast. Not so much this season? 

 

Our daughter skis hers 95% of the time in CO. Will ski a 185cm Patron when the snows real deep, and a SL ski when it's rock hard. Primarily skis at in Aspen, and Crested Butte. Son is an alpine race coach, and he spent at least 100 days a season skiing them, and another 100+ standing around on them!

 

It could be the tune, and I start there. I would tune the base at 1 degree, and the edges at 3. I'd make sure that the bases are flat. 

 

Now, don't take this the wrong way, please. The ski has been wildly popular, and we all see all sorts of people on the ski, in all sorts of conditions and lengths. I know some VERY good skiers who kill it, everywhere on the ski. But they tend to ski very dynamically, with good movement, they tend to have the ski up on edge, and they tend to be charging. I can work the 187cm into all sorts of turn shapes, and ski it from slow to fast. My wife and I spend a few days last season with our daughter, skiing in a lot of very crowded spots.....trees, chutes, the works. Even a bunch of big soft bumps. We both had a blast, but we don't try to pivot on the back side of every bump, etc.

 

I absolutely would not give up on the ski. At all. It so happens that both of the "kids" are on Enforcers this season. A change in affiliation for him. He's on a 193cm, she a 185cm. If you are of the opinion that it's the ski that sucks, I would encourage you to demo a well tuned Enforcer 100 in a 185cm {skis shorter than the Bonafide}. I have skied it, and it does everything well, with a bit less effort. Based on what you're describing as frustrations with the Enforcer, it might be a better fit. 

 

Good market for used Bonafides, too. I doubt if it's ALL the ski. But not everybody does love it. It doesn't excite every skier. There are some of us for whom it's the go-to. I think we're seeing the same thing with the Enforcer. Some people expected the moon, aren't getting it.and are selling it. Some bought it in the wrong size {generally too short.} Some love it. 

 

Like I said do no give up on the Bonafife, and do NOT go to a base bevel of more than 1 degree, or, IMO an edge angle of anything but 3 degrees. Everybody that I know skis it at 1/3, and mounted right on the line. 

 

Good luck. 

post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

bttocs,

 

The ski doesn't appear to be railed, but I might take it to a shop to get a second opinion. Thank you for suggestion and knowledge.

post #7 of 16

BTW,  factory tunes are not always good. Most people expect them to be, and probably they are. But it sure sounds like you got the pair made on Friday afternoon after quitting time. A tune will fix them up if the shop knows how to do it properly (another issue, unfortunately) and then you should judge them.

 

I have never skied them, but I have skied the Brahmas and they pivot pretty easy.

 

One other suggestion to check is your binding mount position. The factory line would be the best I believe. Sometimes there are multiple lines which are confusing.  I skied a friends rockered Atomic Theory with the binding mounted very far forward and it affected the way the ski performed in a bad way for me. I out weigh him by a lot (about 80lbs). It made the tips stay in the snow and not ride up more and in soft heavy snow, the tips were being deflected a lot. I shifted weight back a little and the tips popped out of the snow and I could pivot the skis. Not sure if this applies to you or not, but just a thought. Muleski gave you some good advice also.


Edited by bttocs - 2/18/16 at 10:13am
post #8 of 16

A properly setup and tuned Bonafide will do all of what the OP say his do not, with the right pilot. 

 

Don't take this the wrong way, but I have two shop owner friends who have taken a LOT of Bonafides and Brahma's back in trade. The skis are notorious, in the East, as the example of people buying a ski based on reviews, before demoing, and buying it based on where they would like to ski, and how they hope to ski rather than where the actually DO ski, and their current skill level. It's not really a game improvement ski. When you see a really good skier ripping on either ski, you sort of see what it's designed to do.

 

I've owned the Brahma, Bonafide, Cochise, and Bodacious. More than two pairs of each, all in the longest length. The skis do NOT suck, based on my conversations with the people who I know on them. Like most skis, other than the premium brands, some do come from the factory with some irregularities, for sure. I might say "most" do.  

 

I spent three days in Vail two years ago, and it was clearly a ski of choice among East Coast and Texan guests. I saw dozens of very intermediate at best guys on short Bonafides, skidding all over. I was sort of horrified, but they were all smiling, having fun. Good for Blizzard, good for the industry. Soft intermediate terrain, I guess most people can get by on anything. I didn't see them headed to the more challenging spots there. 

 

I would invest the money to have a good tuning shop flatten the bottoms, but some structure on the bases, set up the base and edges, and do the rest....like removing any hanging burr. A real tuning shop tune. I think it will make a very big difference. 

 

If that doesn't work.....Plan B. 

 

Good luck. 

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank you for everyone's thoughtful replies. I take no offense in questioning technique. That is normally the culprit. In truth, my technique on these are horrible. Whereas I normally have good technique on my other skis, I ski these like a beginner. Also, on these, I attempt to pivot on the top of every turn. The reason is because, on these skis, I have my tail in-between my legs. I can't get them to turn when I want and need them to. I always have that out-of-control feeling.

post #10 of 16

Never been on the Bonafides before, but I own the Latigo and Cochise both in 177 and have skied the 180 Brahma before and absolutely love them all. The blizzards are a pretty burly ski and not all that forgiving, and the thing I noticed the most is you want to be out front driving them, if you get backseat they will quickly remind you. I would get a 1/3 tune and if they still don't pivot, try detuning the tips and tails a little, my buddy with the 180 Brahmas detunes his a little.

post #11 of 16

I borrowed a friend's Bonafides, ugh. He rocked the skis in steeps and bumps. I've tried a few of his other skis and liked them. So I trust his setup. But I hated his Bonafides. They wouldn't turn for me and were a very uncomfortable feel - like the OP.

 

I did like the Brahamas I demoed so it's not a manufacturer prejudice. These were the same hills on the same day that I was enjoying my own skis. And "I am the best skier on the mountain".

 

Some skis suit your style, others don't. Keep them for the ice and get something more fun for the other days.

 

Eric

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix27101 View Post
 

I'm 5'11 ~195lbs. 180 Bonafides bought new. They have factory tune and wax, and I have about 20 days on them.

 

They are amazing in ice, but horrible in everything else. I have skied many other skis and don't have this issue.

 

These skis are impossible to pivot, side slide, or smear. They carve very well, but I can't dump speed in the rocky or steep trees. To give you an other idea, I can ski almost all double blacks at Snowbird and Jackson Hole without an issue with my OTHER skis; however, with these Bonafides, I'm at max an easy single black guy. Its very infuriating. I have no brakes only long carve. They are also garbage in the moguls.

 

I was thinking of going with something like a 1.5/2 or 2/2 bevel tune. Would this potentially help, or make the ski unsaleable?

 

Provided I don't need a speed limit,  this ski does amazing, but I find it at most an intermediate ski, or a ski made for Olympic Moguls.

 

Thank you,

Chris


I had a chance to express my feelings for this ski on several occasions and I didn't get much love for what I said about them. Now I feel relieved  I'm not alone. Your answer is simple -- new skis. And don't worry about selling them -- there  are still tons of Bonafide lovers out there.(fortunately) (and unfortunately)

post #13 of 16

I skied on a friends brand new pair of Bonafides. 

 

Not my cup o' tea. But they skied OK. EAsy as pie to turn!

 

I have never understood why folks say the ski is stiff or demanding. I found neither to be remotely the case. In fact what I didn't like about them is the folding flexible  feeling underfoot.

 

The Bonafide comes with a 1/3 tune from the factory, but that does not mean the base bevel is accurate. 

 

Any ski with a true clean 1 degree is going to side-slip or skid and pivot with no problem. 

 

So to the OP my guess is your base bevel is F'ed up. Erratic base edge or under beveled in the tip and or tail or has a hanging burr on them from side edge work. 

 

Have the side edges been worked on recently in any way?

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix27101 View Post
 

I'm 5'11 ~195lbs. 180 Bonafides bought new. They have factory tune and wax, and I have about 20 days on them.

 

They are amazing in ice, but horrible in everything else. I have skied many other skis and don't have this issue.

 

These skis are impossible to pivot, side slide, or smear. They carve very well, but I can't dump speed in the rocky or steep trees. To give you an other idea, I can ski almost all double blacks at Snowbird and Jackson Hole without an issue with my OTHER skis; however, with these Bonafides, I'm at max an easy single black guy. Its very infuriating. I have no brakes only long carve. They are also garbage in the moguls.

 

I was thinking of going with something like a 1.5/2 or 2/2 bevel tune. Would this potentially help, or make the ski unsaleable?

 

Provided I don't need a speed limit,  this ski does amazing, but I find it at most an intermediate ski, or a ski made for Olympic Moguls.

 

Thank you,

Chris


I feel your pain. I had a similar experience with some brahma's.  Couldn't pivot , skid , slide. Awful in the bumps, etc .  I ever had them tuned, I just assumed the factory would have done a proper job. I sold them before someone said it was probably the tune, probably railed. I guess I should have hung in and sent them to the local shop.

post #15 of 16

20 days on them and they have not been tuned ?

 

Take them to a good shop and tell them you want them set at 1 and 3 

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

20 days on them and they have not been tuned ?

 

Take them to a good shop and tell them you want them set at 1 and 3 

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