or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › How would you coach this bump skier?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How would you coach this bump skier?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Hi all, 

 

This guy in the blue jacket, number 10 bib, passed the CSIA level 3 with a score of at least 8 (a pass in the bumps is a 6). If you were doing your level 3 exam teach with him in your group, how would you further improve his bump skiing? Appreciate it if you can relate it back to the skills of stance&balance, pivoting, edging, pressure control, and timing&coordination. (Starts at 4:23)

 

post #2 of 28
Waaay out of my league, but more absorption and don't let hands fall back after pole plant?
post #3 of 28
Way above my pay grade also, but that never stopped me smile.gif. I think his head is too far down, he should look up more and be focusing further down the hill. As jzmtl mentions, after pole plant, shoulder swings behind instead of staying forward; it might help to try and keep both hands forward.

Compare to hand position and body rotation stability in this video. Also absorption and how closely his skis track the terrain.
post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 

@jzmtl and @enkidu, I'm greedy sometimes, so I'm going to ask you to give me more. How does your feedback relate to the skill you're attempting to develop and the outcome it'll have on snow? E.g. when you say "look up", what is the deficiency that looking down causes in the skier's turns? When you say there's a problem with his hand falling back, what effect do you feel it has on his skiing? Do you see him rotate into his turns because of it? 

post #5 of 28
Looks smooth. I'm no coach but understand bomechanics and racing (concepts are still similar).
As said above, eyes further down the course and hands up and forward.

Skier (while still a strong skier) looks to be more reactive than assertive/aggressive. Hard to plan multiple steps ahead when only looking at the next bump. Also hard to ski at higher speed doing the same. The hands dropping back will also limit how quickly skier will be able to further progress as the speed increases will magnify the flaw and make it harder for skier to keep up with pole plants and effect overall balance. Skier (while not really getting impacted balance wise from the hand staying back on these runs) will in more variable terrain, at higher speeds and greater pitch steepness....which require that much more aggression and will magnify flaws.

As for absorption, not sure if skier was trying to absorb or purposefully getting some air. If not trying to get air, those portions are also (I think) a function of not seeing far enough ahead and not skiing with as much aggression.
post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

@jzmtl and @enkidu, I'm greedy sometimes, so I'm going to ask you to give me more. How does your feedback relate to the skill you're attempting to develop and the outcome it'll have on snow? E.g. when you say "look up", what is the deficiency that looking down causes in the skier's turns? When you say there's a problem with his hand falling back, what effect do you feel it has on his skiing? Do you see him rotate into his turns because of it? 


Well, I'll try. @hbear has covered all my points I think. I think he's only looking one turn ahead, when he should be looking 2-3+ turns ahead allowing more planning and better setup for the turn after the one he's currently in. Usually it's anxiety about the current bump and I'm guessing that the skier is not going to be able to go any faster than the speed he's going in the video. When the hand+arm gets turned back, it definitely does result in a slight rotation of the body, making it harder to start the next turn because the body is (slightly) twisted the wrong way. You can see it best around 4:40-45.

 

With regard to absorption, compare the track of his head vs the track of the head of Tobin (the guy in the video I posted). Despite the fact that Tobin is skiing much bigger moguls, his head tracks a pretty stable line compared to the horizon. #10's head pretty much bobs up and down with every mogul he encounters.

 

Don't get me wrong, it's great skiing with many many more things right about it than wrong, but these flaws will probably keep him from increasing downhill speed or linking lots of shorter turns. Some of the good stuff I see, great leg rotation, perfect fore-aft weight distribution allowing him to maintain pitch despite the lack of absorption, agile and simultaneous rotation and tipping of both skis are the things which really work for me.

 

Head up! Arms out!

post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi all, 

 

This guy in the blue jacket, number 10 bib, passed the CSIA level 3 with a score of at least 8 (a pass in the bumps is a 6). If you were doing your level 3 exam teach with him in your group, how would you further improve his bump skiing? Appreciate it if you can relate it back to the skills of stance&balance, pivoting, edging, pressure control, and timing&coordination. (Starts at 4:23)

 

 

The skier is doing great. He is skiing down a bump run using his standard skiing mode. If I was his coach I would try to transform his skiing from "all mountain" to "bump skiing". Note that I don't consider myself a bump skier but an "all mountain" skier so don't look at my skiing and tell me I'm doing it all wrong.

 

Let me try to brake it up according to your request.

 

stance&balance

Balance is very important in bump skiing. Looks like his balance is ok. It will change once he gets into that bump skiing mode and instead of being most of the time in static balance like he is now he will have to gain better control over dynamic balance. He will be sitting back a lot more and rely on extension to re-centre. Here is where flexing and extending comes in. In the video there is not a lot of it. I would practice running over bumps and flexing deep. Then extending into the throughs. First just crossing over bumps in a traverse but gradually starting to turn on top of the bumps slightly unweighted. Bump impact is also very critical and affects the stance. Use the bumps to slow down. Stuff the tips into the snow piles and try to stay out of the rut. And try to absorb the impact by flexing your legs and folding at the waist a bit. Remember, just like in high performance carving your default stance should be squatted. Not extended. Stay low. Extend out.

 

pivoting

I much rather talk about "turning". This is one of the most important skills in bump skiing in addition to flexing and extending and line which is tactics. The skier in the video is not turning quick enough for mimicking true bump skiing. Ramp up the turning frequency. Practise this on a flat groomer. Try to make very short turns down the fall line. Try to make them round and without a hard edge set. Progressively add edge angle. Keep your upper body facing downhill. A very useful drill is the "dwarf drill". Grab your ski poles half way down and make super short turns down in the fall line. Get those knees going. Loosen up the knees. This also helps you to stay low. I personally don't fancy the pivot and slam tactics that slams you down the zipper line. Note that the pivot is easiest made when the skis are flat or on the crest of a bump. Or actually that's when they should be flat. So pivot on the bump and shape an even turn going down the back side. Don't slide sideways. Don't be afraid of catching speed. The next bump will slow you down.

 

edging

Edging is important to shape your turns. Pro bump skiers dull the edges but I don't think this is the way to go. I use a regular ski setup with sharp edges. I try to stay out of the rut and I increase edging gradually. Practise the dwarf drill and also PreTurn concept turns on a flat groomer. Hockey stops in all forms are also good. Slided, jumped etc.

 

pressure control

Slamming into that rut base can cause a serious pressure increase under foot in form of a hurting pain. When training bumps back in the 70s and 80s in Austria it sounded like a machine gun firing when pro bump skiers flew by. Sometimes that's what you need to do so prepare yourself for a beating. However, if you stuff those ski tips into the front sides of the bump much of the impact will be absorbed by the soft snow and the bending ski. This gives you a slightly more even pressure control.

 

timing&coordination

Bump skiing is all about timing. Be quick in your legs and try to time your turning according to the bumps. There are actually two approaches here. Turn according to the bumps, much like the skier in the video, or just turn and tweak a little to match everything up. Nail is good at this. I'm better at coaching the other approach. You need to coordinate all your movements because you will be skiing in and out of the back seat and you have bumps coming at you at high speed. A good bump skier is able to bail out of a zipper line at any point and stay in balance. This is only possible if he is 100% coordinated. Practise short turns with rhythm changes.

 

Last Sunday I was out skiing for fun at our local hill. They had a man made zipper line made and it was very icy and hard due to the soft slushy conditions. However, right next to it the snow looked perfect. So I started to make my own zipper line with much more rounded turns. After a while a woman that had been failing badly in the zipper line rut skied up to me and asked for help. I told her that I was cheating. I was not skiing the zipper line rut but beside it. We did a few drills and her biggest challenge turned out to be turning her skis quick enough. She didn't pivot the skis quick enough when they were flat. When her edge angle increased pivoting became impossible and her skis stayed too much in the fall line. Her speed picked up and she missed the turns.

 

I don't have a problem with the skier in the video looking one bump ahead. I do that also. I like to deal with what's coming at me in real time. This is not entirely true because I scout for nice sections so I look ahead but not all the time.

 

The pole swing is a bit sloppy but I don't mind that either. I don't like the pro mogul type small wrist movement straight ahead with knee long poles. For me same equipment should be used as on a groomer.

 

Since it was a demo run it was more controlled than normally. I guess that's all part of the game.

 

With the skier in the video I would work on short turns on a flat groomer for a solid quick and shaped short turn technique. Then I would practice flexing and extending and then how to apply it all in the bumps. Also, I'm old school so I don't have a problem with screwing it all up once in a while. Go faster than you can. Take air. Skip a bump. Crash. Have fun, its all part of bump skiing.

post #8 of 28

Arm circles stand out the most. They are using regular ski gear without shorter poles bump skiers would be using.   Is that video actual speed or slow motion?  Other than the arms, looks like decent slow to moderate speed cruising through some nice, puffy pow bumps!  Good skiing.

post #9 of 28

As to technique, in the early 90's I was told to pivot under boot because I skied old school by following the tip (still do and prefer it, but can pivot under boot) and this was on 205 GS skis at the mogul run in Norquay (yes the one with the VW Bug moguls on a super steep run).  Both methods require commitment and slightly different lines and approach to a mogul run.  Being able to both makes for a really good skier as you very rarely get caught in a bad situation.  What is interesting that while both methods are different they require several items that are very similar and the skier shown did not exhibit:

 

  • Hands stay up and forward, hands come back/down only for correction (as it shows you made an error).  Also means you can get hurt bad in the upper body (back) if you get caught with the hands down and back.
  • Head up to pick your line
  • Knees compress and move, not whole body (body movement means you didn't absorb the bump correctly),
  • Upper body always remains facing (appears stationary) down the line, lower body (hips down) reacts to the line as required.

 

As to a good run how about this.

 

post #10 of 28

This is a separate post and comment not on the mogul run, but more on the level of instructors themselves.

 

This is a CSIA III?, really doesn't make me want to get any lessons.

 

On Monday this week I was out skiing, hard pack underneath, 1" of packing snow on top, skiing with a seasoned and experienced CSIA II, found out that she could not do 360 spins in these conditions (actually she got slammed hard that even I felt the pain).  To make matters worse, she was on 165 SL type cut top end rec ski with 1/3 tune, with at least 16 days this season, and I was on GS FIS with a 0.5/4 tune spinning no problem (I do it for balance and edge feel couple of times each day out for practice) and this was the first day out.  Come on..... balance/edge feel should be second nature at this point.

 

This is not the first time that I have encounter this.  My complaint is that most instructors can ski the CSIA way, but nothing else and are very limited in understanding technique.  The top ones well they can ski period and do have the full basket of technique and understand the implications but are not allowed to teach that.

 

As shown in the video, he passed because he knew the still not because he skied well.  In various threads it has been commented on how to correct certain issues, and they stem not from a skier making the mistake but poor instruction at certain stages that sets the wrong patterns.  Looking correct and skiing correct is two different things.

 

For the instructors that are amazing (and there are a few on this site), my hats off to you, but you are undermined by CSIA (I'll include PSIA) and those that they let pass.  I'd rather learn from someone who knows right from wrong than someone that looks right but has no clue.

 

Sorry for the rant, but had to get that off my chest.

post #11 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
I'd rather learn from someone who knows right from wrong than someone that looks right but has no clue.

This is very important, but I doubt most people understand the difference...

post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 

oldschoolskier, level 3s can teach at the advanced level (e.g. black bumps, advanced parallel on blue-to-black groomers, advanced short radius on black). If you ski beyond the level 3 standard and you want a lesson, you should get a level 4. If you ski beyond the level 4 standard, get a demo team member. If you want to ski with a racer "look", hire a race coach. If you want to learn to ski a zipperline, hire a freestyle coach. 

 

If you want to start a separate thread to bemoan the state of ski instruction, I'd be happy to point out the fallacies in your argument. What I'm going for here though is how epicski instructors would develop this guy. 

post #13 of 28

To my untrained eye it seems like his absorption/extension is backward. Like he's hunkering down between the bumps and standing tallest at the crest of the bump.  I think having him compare video of what he's doing in that regard to say the video enkidu posted would give him a good idea of what he needs to work on.

 

edit: looking at it again, backward or not he seems to be pulling it off...so maybe not what he needs to work on but what he could work on if he wanted to try a different approach.


Edited by Abox - 2/18/16 at 6:35pm
post #14 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

oldschoolskier, level 3s can teach at the advanced level (e.g. black bumps, advanced parallel on blue-to-black groomers, advanced short radius on black). If you ski beyond the level 3 standard and you want a lesson, you should get a level 4. If you ski beyond the level 4 standard, get a demo team member. If you want to ski with a racer "look", hire a race coach. If you want to learn to ski a zipperline, hire a freestyle coach. 

 

If you want to start a separate thread to bemoan the state of ski instruction, I'd be happy to point out the fallacies in your argument. What I'm going for here though is how epicski instructors would develop this guy. 

As I said in the post, it is a little off topic (and apologized up front), just a rant that had to be said, seeing that this is what passes for a Level 3 as it does look bad for CSIA and give a poor representation of what they can do.  BTW you are right it should be a separate thread and has been when you go through the site.

 

On Topic, as to what he requires, here it is again.

 

  • Hands stay up and forward, hands come back/down only for correction (as it shows you made an error).  Also means you can get hurt bad in the upper body (back) if you get caught with the hands down and back.
  • Head up to pick your line
  • Knees compress and move, not whole body (body movement means you didn't absorb the bump correctly),
  • Upper body always remains facing (appears stationary) down the line, lower body (hips down) reacts to the line as required.
post #15 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

@jzmtl
 and @enkidu
, I'm greedy sometimes, so I'm going to ask you to give me more. How does your feedback relate to the skill you're attempting to develop and the outcome it'll have on snow? E.g. when you say "look up", what is the deficiency that looking down causes in the skier's turns? When you say there's a problem with his hand falling back, what effect do you feel it has on his skiing? Do you see him rotate into his turns because of it? 

That guy can ski way better than I can so I could only relate the problems with my own experience in bumps. From what I can tell in the video, the bumps are relatively wide apart and snow is relatively soft, so skiing that way isn't a problem. But when it gets icy and bumps are tight, arm/shoulder falling back would cause too much upper body rotation, which put the skier in a bad position to deal with the following moguls. Say your skis are turned to the left, sliding up the 1st bump to your right. You plant your pole on the 1st bump but let it push and rotate your upper body to the right. For the 2nd bump, which is to your left and you need to turn your ski to right, the effect isn't immediately seen, but on the 3rd one to your right again where you need to turn ski to the left, it will be very difficult because your body is facing the wrong direction.

Without absorption you would rely on your COG to drop down naturally with gravity, again not a problem if there's enough time to do it between moguls. But when it gets tight gravity won't pull you down fast enough to engage the edge until your skis are already near top of the next bump, so speed control becomes a real problem.
post #16 of 28

That's a good pass for CSIA 3 in my book, but there are unlimited opportunities in all the skills (even though I don't call all of those things skills) mentioned for ramping up performance. How I would coach that skier for improvement depends. If I was being scored in an exam for improvement I would choose a coaching approach that would show immediate improvement like a straighter line, faster foot speed, and keeping the hands in front. The straighter line forces a lot of things.It gives him less of a chance to get caught in the back seat (stance and balance), requires quicker turns (pivoting and timing), higher edge angles instead of skis turned more out of the fall line (edging), more time with ski to snow contact (pressure control). If I was coaching this skier as a student who wanted to go on the path for the most improvement long term, I'd teach him looking ahead and seeing bumps in groups of threes and skiing the current set of three while looking for the next set. If I was coaching this skier as a student who wanted some quick tips for quick improvement I'd give him some tactics to add to his bag of tricks (e.g. carving the back sides of moguls to set up for getting on edge above the fall line on the front side of the next mogul, quick edge set check moves to control speed and chopping large bumps in half by putting in an extra turn in between the ruts to go over the top instead of staying in a long rut and getting turned out of the fall line. Those kinds of tactics utilize the skills mentioned as opposed to developing them.

post #17 of 28
Try shortening poles an inch or two to start. The blocking pole plants won't "block" quite as much.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 

Rusty, I like your tactical approach of using skills rather than developing skills. The skier likely already has strong skills, so expanding his tactics should get him some improvement. 

 

Can you clarify how you find his line isn't very direct? He doesn't appear to be shopping, his skis travel horizontally by one bump max per turn... 

 

Can you clarify your group of 3 tactic? What configuration of 3 do you look at? (e.g. 3 side by side isn't the same as 3 directly downhill, or 2 downhill plus the 1 in between. Can you show me an example?) This tactic is not specifically a CSIA standby, but anything that helps the skier tactically is valid. 

 

Regarding skills: When we do our level 3 teach, we don't try to develop every single skill :) it's just that any change we make has to improve at least one skill; if the development doesn't improve a skill, then we're just working on aesthetics (and aesthetics are irrelevant in skiing). 

 

This guy is the kind of skier I really hope to not get on the exam. :duck:Hopefully (and probably) my guys will fall in the 4-7 range.

 

What I notice is his skis tend to pivot quickly, rather than being in constant motion. He also gets tossed a bit more than his skills suggest he should, which I think is due to a lack of core engagement. (On the other hand, he does a beautiful hop between the bumps, so we know he can work the ski!)

 

What do you think about this: 

 

I'd like to help him create more flow through the bumps by creating constant movement of his lower joints. To free up those joints to move, we've got to stabilize the core. As an exercise, we can use a stabilizing pole plant following through with moving the hand forward downhill rather than leaving it in place (ala poke them in the toes, punch them in the nose). We could combine the pole plant's timing with exhaling to engage the core. 

 

Depending on how things go, if we get results there, I'd progress into creating some natural balance on the outside ski early. When the skier reaches the bump side, their cue is to allow the inside half of the body to rise from the hip, creating natural balance on the outside ski and natural separation.  We probably wouldn't get this far in our 40 minute practice teach though! 

post #19 of 28

One thing that makes the MA tough here is we don't know the skiers *intent*

If he was told to let it rip and ski with flair and panache, I don't think he did that.

If the goal was smooth skiing that a person in a upper level lesson could emulate, I think he did do that.

 

I like Rusty's approach with lots of areas that might be touched upon;

if I had to pick just one thing I would work on greater absorption / increased range of motion.

post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

docbrad, this was a level 3 exam  

post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

docbrad, this was a level 3 exam

I know - but we still don't know how he was asked to ski this run.   I took a clinic with level II PSIA guys working for Level III.  The trainer that day wanted to see a more aggressive attacking style than shown in this video.

 

What I'm getting at is this:  what would this skier look like if tasked with an aggressive fall line approach to these bumps?

If the task was to be fluid composed and controlled, we should *not* assess him against something else....

post #22 of 28
Thread Starter 

I see what you're asking. Fluid, balanced, mobile, rhythmic, with some load and deflection are the order of the day for a level 3, from what I recall on the last course. It needs to be a demo of advanced skiing that demonstrates refinement-level skills. They are not looking for wild skiing. I'm impressed that he did a jump in the bumps ;)

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

I see what you're asking. Fluid, balanced, mobile, rhythmic, with some load and deflection are the order of the day for a level 3, from what I recall on the last course. It needs to be a demo of advanced skiing that demonstrates refinement-level skills. They are not looking for wild skiing. I'm impressed that he did a jump in the bumps ;)

That's (also) what I would expect ("order of the day") so we have to temper any comments that go in the direction of letting it rip more. For someone wanting to improve in the moguls I believe this video would give them confidence in this particular instructor

post #24 of 28

PSIA-E L3 typically has two bump tasks. One is called "schoolhouse bumps" where you are demoing intro level bump skiing. The other is "show me what you got" bump skiing. The run here is borderline pass for PSIA-E L3 in my book.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Rusty, I like your tactical approach of using skills rather than developing skills. The skier likely already has strong skills, so expanding his tactics should get him some improvement. 

 

Can you clarify how you find his line isn't very direct? He doesn't appear to be shopping, his skis travel horizontally by one bump max per turn... 

 

Can you clarify your group of 3 tactic? What configuration of 3 do you look at? (e.g. 3 side by side isn't the same as 3 directly downhill, or 2 downhill plus the 1 in between. Can you show me an example?) This tactic is not specifically a CSIA standby, but anything that helps the skier tactically is valid. 

 

Regarding skills: When we do our level 3 teach, we don't try to develop every single skill :) it's just that any change we make has to improve at least one skill; if the development doesn't improve a skill, then we're just working on aesthetics (and aesthetics are irrelevant in skiing). 

 

This guy is the kind of skier I really hope to not get on the exam. :duck:Hopefully (and probably) my guys will fall in the 4-7 range.

 

What I notice is his skis tend to pivot quickly, rather than being in constant motion. He also gets tossed a bit more than his skills suggest he should, which I think is due to a lack of core engagement. (On the other hand, he does a beautiful hop between the bumps, so we know he can work the ski!)

 

What do you think about this: 

 

I'd like to help him create more flow through the bumps by creating constant movement of his lower joints. To free up those joints to move, we've got to stabilize the core. As an exercise, we can use a stabilizing pole plant following through with moving the hand forward downhill rather than leaving it in place (ala poke them in the toes, punch them in the nose). We could combine the pole plant's timing with exhaling to engage the core. 

 

Depending on how things go, if we get results there, I'd progress into creating some natural balance on the outside ski early. When the skier reaches the bump side, their cue is to allow the inside half of the body to rise from the hip, creating natural balance on the outside ski and natural separation.  We probably wouldn't get this far in our 40 minute practice teach though! 

I'll try ...

Quote:
Can you clarify how you find his line isn't very direct? He doesn't appear to be shopping, his skis travel horizontally by one bump max per turn... 

He gets his skis sideways to the fall line a lot. He would not have to if he absorbed more effectively. He never gets two turns in per bump. His feet are never "fast".

 

Quote:
Can you clarify your group of 3 tactic? 

In the trees you look for the space between the trees. In the bumps, you should see the path between the bumps instead of the bumps. And you should be able to ski that path without thinking about how to do it or actually looking at it. In normal bump runs (i.e. not a perfect zipper line), the seeable skiable path ends at a problem bump shape. While you're skiing the skiable path, you're selecting from plan a, b and c for how to deal with the problem bump. As you're skiing the problem bump, you pick up the next seeable skiable path.

 

Quote:
What I notice is his skis tend to pivot quickly, rather than being in constant motion. He also gets tossed a bit more than his skills suggest he should, which I think is due to a lack of core engagement. (On the other hand, he does a beautiful hop between the bumps, so we know he can work the ski!)

Nothing wrong with this MA. I look at it as a chicken vs egg problem.  Yes, learning to "skarve" (i.e. stretch out the pivot movements to micro skid on a higher edge) would help and would engage the core more, but engaging the core (e.g. functional tension) doesn't solve the tossing here. Engaging the edges more will solve the tossing. But it's hard to get from here to there.

 

Quote:
What do you think about this: 

That approach could work. There are many ways to skin the cat bump. I'd typically use the increasing/decreasing strength handshake drill (do a low, medium and strong handshake defining a 1, 5 and 10 strength grip, the count to 10 and back gradually changing the strength of the grip) to define continuous movement. Then work on continuous movements on groomed runs before trying to achieve it in the bumps. Changing the pole touches is an essential part of strengthening this skier's bump skiing. Does the pole touch cause stronger turns? Is it a prerequisite for stronger turns? Is it something that can come naturally by focusing on a straighter line? There are no wrong answers here. Some times I'll change the turn to take advantage of the pole technique (e.g. increase pivoting uphill at the end of a turn)  vs try to change the pole technique to match the turns I'd like to see. Sorry if this does not help much.

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Hi all, 

This guy in the blue jacket, number 10 bib, passed the CSIA level 3 with a score of at least 8 (a pass in the bumps is a 6). If you were doing your level 3 exam teach with him in your group, how would you further improve his bump skiing? Appreciate it if you can relate it back to the skills of stance&balance, pivoting, edging, pressure control, and timing&coordination. (Starts at 4:23)



I think he needs to keep his upper body facing down hill. The reason is that it's too slow and burdensome to move your entire body back and forth. He needs to improve his absorption and extension to advance to more difficult bumps without getting knocked off balance or getting too fast.
post #27 of 28

Buddy just needs some Jean-Luc style contrasting knee patches; i.e. Fate, BFA, Predator, SMS. I hand-stitched some Jolly Rogers (skull & crossbones) on my knees back around '95/96 before Fate became popular. Nobody cared.:nono: 

 

Yep, my recommendation: go back in time and ski Killington in the '90's with the rest of us hacks!

 


Edited by MT Skull - 2/22/16 at 2:27am
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post
 

 

 

Yep, my recommendation: go back in time and ski Killington in the '90's with the rest of us hacks!

 

 

 

 

Hit it switch.

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › How would you coach this bump skier?