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DIN adjustment question

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I got some new skis and bindings this season and had them professionally mounted.  They set the DIN for my weight/age/ability.

 

As happened in an earlier set of skis that I had mounted I experienced several pre-releases of my heel on both skis when I skied off piste over uneven surfaces at higher speeds.  I cranked the heel one DIN number higher.  The pre-releasing stopped.  I left the toes as they were since I had not had any toe release concerns.

 

My question is:

Is it OK to have a different DIN setting between the toe and heel pieces?

post #2 of 19
No. I did the same thing and a friend that is a tech said bad idea. Keep them the same DIN.
post #3 of 19

It's fine for the toes and heels to be different--if they're wildly different one might suspect the bindings to be defective, but a one unit difference is not unusual. Finding the correct DIN is not an exact science, since the ranges of weight, height, and BSL used to calculate the setting are quite broad. (Your setting does not change a full 1.5 units just because you gain a pound from 174 to 175, for example). You did the right thing (assuming the forward pressure is set correctly and the shop release tested the bindings to confirm that they aren't defective). The correct DIN is the lowest setting at which you don't pre-release. Note also that a binding with a lot of elastic travel may allow a lower setting without pre-releasing.

 

Re: Slider's friend--a tech is required to set the binding at the calculated DIN for heels and toes. For liability reasons they don't have the discretion to alter the settings. You do. You should understand that by increasing the setting on the heel you increase the risk of injury in a fall while reducing the risk of injury due to pre-release. You do the same thing when you give your ability level as III rather than II.

post #4 of 19

Ya or nah, you need them set to release when you go over the handlebars.  If you tighten the heels beyond your personal specs they won't release as easily when they are supposed to.  Is it possible the forward pressure is too strong, causing them to pop out too easily?

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Ya or nah, you need them set to release when you go over the handlebars.  If you tighten the heels beyond your personal specs they won't release as easily when they are supposed to.  Is it possible the forward pressure is too strong, causing them to pop out too easily?


Not a tech.  I took them to a local place I trust.  I didn't go over the handlebars, I was skiing along in good control and the ski just left my foot, of course I crashed right after.  Strange feeling to be skiing along and have your ski just eject like that.  I skied along on one foot through the crud for what seemed like a long time, though it wasn't.  This happened three separate times over two days.  It happened when the ski flexed as I went over a lump or transition point.

 

I'll probably leave them the way they are.

post #6 of 19
I never like the term "pre-release". If a binding releases, it's doing its job. But I know what you mean.

How do you know only the heel released and not the toe? When the toe piece releases (up or sideways) it returns to its original position (unlike the heel which must be manually reset).

If I were you I would adjust both toe and heel to the same DIN.
Edited by joe strummer - 2/16/16 at 8:22pm
post #7 of 19

Also, depending on the binding, I'd double check the forward pressure, down/ht adjustment, and if Salomon - the wings. It is amazing how easy it can be a for a shop person to be off a bit on any of these. Some bindings can be notably quirky....

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe strummer View Post


How do you know only the heel released and not the toe? When the toe piece releases (up or sideways) it returns to its original position (unlike the heel which must be manually reset).
 

The heel was released when I picked up the ski.  It didn't happen in a turn with lateral force.  In each case I was traveling in a straight line at speed.

 

I once had a tibia/fibula spiral fracture because my toe piece didn't release.  I do not want to crank it down any more than needed.  They have yet to release after over 20 days on snow.  I think they're OK but I'll look again.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

The heel was released when I picked up the ski.  It didn't happen in a turn with lateral force.  In each case I was traveling in a straight line at speed.

 

I once had a tibia/fibula spiral fracture because my toe piece didn't release.  I do not want to crank it down any more than needed.  They have yet to release after over 20 days on snow.  I think they're OK but I'll look again.

http://www.vermontskisafety.com/vsrfaq5.php

 

Read this . Very informative. May help you decide!

post #10 of 19
Not a problem to set different release numbers on toe and heel. I would double check the forward pressure setting though.
post #11 of 19


Is this a binding that you've never used before? I mean a different brand of model. As mentioned above, some bindings behave much differently than others. For example, if you've always skied on a very elastic binding and now these are not at all, then what you could be experiencing is the fact that the same release force is now letting you leave the binding where your very elastic binding would have brought you beck in. (How was that for a run on sentence?)

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

The heel was released when I picked up the ski.  It didn't happen in a turn with lateral force.  In each case I was traveling in a straight line at speed.

 

I once had a tibia/fibula spiral fracture because my toe piece didn't release.  I do not want to crank it down any more than needed.  They have yet to release after over 20 days on snow.  I think they're OK but I'll look again.

Thumbs Up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Not a problem to set different release numbers on toe and heel. I would double check the forward pressure setting though.

Thumbs Up

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

I didn't give the entire story at the beginning because my question seemed simple and I didn't want to complicate it with too many details, but several questions have come up that might be enlightened if I give all of the facts.

 

I actually have two sets of new skis.  One set of skis has Marker bindings, the other Salomon.   The Markers were set higher because I asked the shop to do it.  I had no release problems.  When I had the Salomans mounted I decided to try having them set them at the normal DIN setting and when I got them I backed the Markers off to that setting too.

 

First, I skied the Markers.  I was skiing in a straight line in soft crud when I hit what must have been an ice chunk.  My ski flexed a lot, the heel released, and I ended up crashing.

 

Second, I skied the Salomans the next dy and twice on that same day I transitioned from crud/soft snow to a groomer at speed and at the transition point the snow on the groomer was significantly compressed below the ungroomed.  Right at the transition point the ski flexed and I ejected.

 

Two sets of skis, two different manufacturers, same result.  In each case the heel completely released.  When I cranked them to one DIN setting higher the release problem stopped.

 

I should also note that a very similar thing happened about 8 years ago when I had a pair of bindings mounted.  I cranked them up a notch and I had no problems after that.


Edited by Posaune - 2/17/16 at 9:07pm
post #14 of 19

Sounds to me like your may be a type 3+ skier. That will set the DIN's higher.

 

 

I have the same type story from 6 years ago.  I used to be a DIN of 8.5 type 3 skier, I began to pre release, when I did that on two different skis, I decided it was time to chose type 3+ skier.

post #15 of 19

I think it really depends on how aggressive the actions are what cause the release.  If skiing hard and really cranking turns across chattery or bumpy stuff I'd go with needing a higher ski level DIN.  If seemingly benign motions are causing the ski to just get left behind pretty inexplicably forward pressure is to blame... If the toe pops out to the side, not enough forward pressure.. If you're popping up the heel, too much forward pressure are the usual culprits..

post #16 of 19

Going to asked the stupid question,

 

Condition of boots (specifically the soles)?

 

Since you've experience this with different bindings.

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

Going to asked the stupid question,

 

Condition of boots (specifically the soles)?

 

Since you've experience this with different bindings.


These are fairly new boots.  The soles are not yet worn.

post #18 of 19
Additional question is when you say tech setup your skis and bindings din, what exactly did they do?
Just setup the din like how mail order would do?
Or also set fwd pressure, height or other adjustments (if applicable)and manual/visual inspection with your actual boot being tested and stuck in each binding?
Or also machine test them on the binding tester to see if ita releasing at the exact torques?
I would go back and get adjustments and bindings tested to the right din. If you're still coming out, then move it up.
post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

 
Going to asked the stupid question,

Condition of boots (specifically the soles)?

Since you've experience this with different bindings.


These are fairly new boots.  The soles are not yet worn.

icon14.gif

Takes that out of the picture.

At this point I'm just going to sit back and follow to see what else comes up.
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