or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Left my poles behind, and learned to ski!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Left my poles behind, and learned to ski!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone.

 

Interesting thing happened to me this weekend. I intentionally left my poles behind. Carrying my 4-year-old's skis, helmet etc makes it really hard to carry poles as well.

 

At first it was really really hard. I just couldn't ski. So I PRETENDED that I had them. Making the pole plant motion with my arms was perfectly fine.

 

As I carried on, without the focus of pole plants, my brain gradually started to think of skiing as a single fluid motion, and not a succession of turns around pole plants. Within 30 minutes I was carving in a dynamic style! I was on a very groomed black run (red dog at squaw). I could feel the edges, the speed, and I had pretty decent angle, and I was keeping pace with the race kids. I really thought I could never ski like this, but there you go.

 

Drop your poles. (worked for me, ymmv :D)

post #2 of 12
Congrats. I had something similar happen a few years ago. My pole got caught on something while loading lift and I dropped them. I was in a clinic and instructor asked if I would be good for a run I said yea no worries. That run was best of day and instructor told me wow you ski better without poles. Now I figured how to use poles but taking runs without was a good thing to prioritize footwork.
post #3 of 12

Nice!  Sounds like you crushed it =)

post #4 of 12

Watch the race kids. You might notice they spend a lot of time skiing without poles for the same reason.

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by billgreen View Post
 

Watch the race kids. You might notice they spend a lot of time skiing without poles for the same reason.

well... not necessarily for the exact same reason...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by failtocrushit View Post

 

Carrying my 4-year-old's skis, helmet etc makes it really hard to carry poles as well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

My pole got caught on something while loading lift and I dropped them.

 

:beercheer: 

post #6 of 12


You know what I meant. For the technical benefits. Coaches ski without poles because their hands are full.

post #7 of 12

Poles in skiing are weird. They're almost like a "cheat" or "power-up" for decent skiers: 

 

They make it easier to balance (both by extending the base of support when planting and stabilizing our centre of mass)

They assist in stopping the spinning forces to set you up for a new turn (think: blocking pole plant, or even a steered short radius)

They help recover if you tip in too much (yes, I agree that this is a sloppy use of poles)

They give people an external focus to help with timing and coordinating their movements

They really help when skating uphill!

 

On the flipside, when skiers get all mixed up with the poles, poles have just as strong of a detrimental effect. 

 

Maybe more of us would benefit from pole-free skiing to "dial in" every day, then bring the poles back to increase our skiing performance. 

post #8 of 12
Laser pointers.
post #9 of 12

Try skiing with your hands on your hips, thumbs forward.  (Thumbs forward helps bring the shoulders forward.)  This reduces useless and harmful upper body movements.  It makes it better to notice upper body counter--turn to the left on a right turn, and vice versa.  Ski with your feet and use the upper body to amplify the effect.

post #10 of 12

Hands on hips is a great activity every so often. Many of us have poor spatial awareness of our hips, which means we don't always know how our lower body's interacting with the upper body. By putting your hands on your hips, you physically feel where they're positioned in space, whether you have separation, whether you're inclining or angulating, whether you have early balance on your outside ski, etc. 


Edited by Metaphor_ - 2/21/16 at 8:52am
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Poles in skiing are weird. They're almost like a "cheat" or "power-up" for decent skiers: 

 

They make it easier to balance (both by extending the base of support when planting and stabilizing our centre of mass)

They assist in stopping the spinning forces to set you up for a new turn (think: blocking pole plant, or even a steered short radius)

They help recover if you tip in too much (yes, I agree that this is a sloppy use of poles)

They give people an external focus to help with timing and coordinating their movements

They really help when skating uphill!

 

 

They let me take my weight off of my feet when I rest.

post #12 of 12

Your arms can represent up to 30 pounds of highly influential mass in an area of your body that you want to remain relatively quiet.  On the other hand, with proper discipline, the poles that we attach to the end of the arms can enhance our timing and help in creating positive movements.

 

Try taking your poles and hold them parallel to the ground with hands about 6 inches apart. then cross your hands and "tuck" the poles up into your arm pits. This will create a solid core of mass and hopefully you will be able to focus on the lower body without undue influence from the majority of your mass.

 

If that works for you then you need to come to the realization that training to develop discipline in your arms is a requirement. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Left my poles behind, and learned to ski!