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self binding test

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

I have some adjustable bindings that I need to test + also my fixed bindings same DIN from last year.

For the front, I  understand you twist your foot to the left and then another test to the right to see if it releases.

However, for the heel, I've heard it's dangerous for the achilles. Is there a better way without being able to clamp the ski down?

COuld someone stand on the front and I stand on the back of ski and just pull a boot out?

post #2 of 15

Or just pay the $20 for a proper test at a shop. Surely that's worth the peace of mind, knowing that your bindings will release when they're supposed to. 

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bro12 View Post
 

Or just pay the $20 for a proper test at a shop. Surely that's worth the peace of mind, knowing that your bindings will release when they're supposed to. 

To have a technician pull them out with their hands like they normally test rental skis? ;)

I know what you're saying but I have 2 pairs of skis so that's $40 for starters.

Sure it's not going to break the bank but I'd at least like to know how to do this myself...a lot of people seem to, no?

post #4 of 15
Quote:

Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post

 

To have a technician pull them out with their hands like they normally test rental skis? ;)

 

Uhhh, yeah...if you don't count the $6000 worth of tools that they actually use to do the test.

 

Find a good shop.

post #5 of 15

dont risk your knees on it, take them in -  did the same recently on some skis i picked up with some demo binders for my visitors , only cost me 15 bucks

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackke17 View Post
 

dont risk your knees on it, take them in -  did the same recently on some skis i picked up with some demo binders for my visitors , only cost me 15 bucks

I've seen a lot of people suggest doing a daily binding check on the slopes. Does anyone do that?

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post
 

Uhhh, yeah...if you don't count the $6000 worth of tools that they actually use to do the test.

 

Find a good shop.

I guess I might have been to some odd places then :) In all my years of skiing, every technician I ever saw, just adjusted the DIN and pulled the boot out with their hands forcefully. eg they just clamp the ski to a bench and then put the boot in, then pull up at the heel.

post #8 of 15

Here's how I used to do it back in the day: put the boot on and in the binding, have someone stand on the back of the ski and lunge forward.  You the binding should release with the lunge, but not too easily.  

 

I accept no responsibility or liability for this test.  Always worked for me but I haven't done this in close to 20 years.

post #9 of 15

I've done hundreds of binding checks back in the day.  Can you do a self-test?  Well, yeah, you can.  Understand there is no liability to yourself.  If you're comfortable pulling the boot out to verify it will actually release at some point, go for it.  You can't feel the difference between a DIN of 4 and a DIN of 6 with your hands.  If you've done hundreds and you do them daily, you might be able to.  Does it matter?  If you believe in the DIN chart it matters.  But for some, if you're comfortable that the force you're applying will not blow your knees out in your time of need, have at it.

post #10 of 15

As I understand it, bindings don't protect your knees.  They protect your bones.

 

Am I wrong?

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

As I understand it, bindings don't protect your knees.  They protect your bones.

Am I wrong?

(one binding brand does...)
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

As I understand it, bindings don't protect your knees.  They protect your bones.

 

Am I wrong?

The DIN standard is engineered based on the force necessary to break a tibia. That doesn't mean bindings won't protect your knees--depending on the binding setting and the way you fall. The problems are that it's easier to tear a ligament than to break a tibia and that knees are often injured in falls that put upward force on the toe of the binding and most bindings are not designed to release that way. But if the binding is set low enough and you fall the "right" way then the binding can protect your knee.

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post
 

To have a technician pull them out with their hands like they normally test rental skis? ;)

I know what you're saying but I have 2 pairs of skis so that's $40 for starters.

Sure it's not going to break the bank but I'd at least like to know how to do this myself...a lot of people seem to, no?

 

No, that is not what you're paying $20 for. You're not talking about rental skis, you're talking about your own skis. When a shop tech hand tests a rental binding, it's because they've just changed the DIN setting, and they're giving it an "eyeball" check to ensure it'll release. What you don't see is that at any reputable mountain, those same skis are regularly tested on a machine that actually measures and quantifies their release force at different DIN settings. That's how they know the binding is working properly. When you have your own skis torque tested, they are putting your skis on that machine, and measuring each release to ensure the binding is popping at the right point. That is not something you can actually quantify with your hands. 

 

Yes, $40 bucks is a pain in the butt. But I'm willing to bet breaking your leg because your binding is improperly adjusted will cost a good bit more.

post #14 of 15
When I had an issue with getting the right boots for my long, narrow feet, my shop had to remount my Pivot 12 bindings (limited adjustment range) and did the release test for free after I purchased the new, expensive boots. It pays to do regular business with your local shop!
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

No, that is not what you're paying $20 for. You're not talking about rental skis, you're talking about your own skis. When a shop tech hand tests a rental binding, it's because they've just changed the DIN setting, and they're giving it an "eyeball" check to ensure it'll release. What you don't see is that at any reputable mountain, those same skis are regularly tested on a machine that actually measures and quantifies their release force at different DIN settings. That's how they know the binding is working properly. When you have your own skis torque tested, they are putting your skis on that machine, and measuring each release to ensure the binding is popping at the right point. That is not something you can actually quantify with your hands. 

Yes, $40 bucks is a pain in the butt. But I'm willing to bet breaking your leg because your binding is improperly adjusted will cost a good bit more.

Bingo, finally a good answer. GordonFreeman do you really think that a self test is ok if you have any doubts about your bindings? roflmao.gif
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