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Simplified Turn

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Was hoping someone could tell me if my understanding of a basic edged turn is correct.  I get somewhat confused by the terms inside/outside ski when reading through the forums.  Let's say im going down a hill and want to turn right.  Would i tip my skis to the right and apply pressure to my right ski and then at the end of the turn/beginning of new turn shift my weight over to the left ski and do the same on left side to make left turn?  Also, why is it important to tip with the front of the skis (pinkie toe or big toe) vs the middle/whole ski.

 

Please let me know if any clarification is needed - it makes sense to me but may not to others.

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukeRoz View Post
 

Was hoping someone could tell me if my understanding of a basic edged turn is correct.  I get somewhat confused by the terms inside/outside ski when reading through the forums.  Let's say im going down a hill and want to turn right.  Would i tip my skis to the right and apply pressure to my right ski and then at the end of the turn/beginning of new turn shift my weight over to the left ski and do the same on left side to make left turn?  Also, why is it important to tip with the front of the skis (pinkie toe or big toe) vs the middle/whole ski.

 

Please let me know if any clarification is needed - it makes sense to me but may not to others.

 

Thank you.

 

I doubt you have been confused this way here at epic. You should be skiing with outside ski pressure so if you are turning right you should mainly be pressuring your left ski. But pressuring a ski will not make you turn if you are not in a wedge. So can you be a bit more specific about HOW you are trying to turn? If you are carving edge locked you should only be tipping to turn. Tip right to turn right. However, you need balancing movements and you need outside ski pressure here as well. This is a higher skill turn so carving you learn later on as you come past intermediate level (my assumption you are not an advanced skier yet).

post #3 of 5

Hi Luke,

 

When you start a turn to the right, your right ski is the inside ski. We use the terms inside and outside ski because these terms are the least confusing. We could talk about downhill vs uphill skis or left vs right, etc. Each approach has it's own problems.

 

There are many different ways to start turns. Whether you tip first or turn first or weight first or make some combination of moves first is a matter of choice for a skilled skier. Inexperienced skiers have fewer options. Skilled skiers balance over their outside ski. For a right turn, this would be balancing against the left ski. Whether you purposely shift your weight onto the left foot or wait for the forces involved in turning to the right to "pull" your weight onto the left foot is a choice you can make. Opinions on which approach is better vary. Try both and decide for yourself.

 

Skis are shaped fat at the ends and skinny in the middle. When you tip a ski onto an edge, it creates an arc in the snow. If the ski is pressured so that the edge can grab in the snow, the ski will want to travel along the shape of the arc (i.e. turn). If the ski is not pressured at the tip or the tail it will not want to travel along the arc very well. Because a ski is typically moving forward in the snow, most skiers don't have any trouble pressuring the tail of the ski. Many skiers do have trouble moving their body to stay with the ski (i.e. the skis tend to "pull" them down the hill). This makes it hard to maintain pressure on the tip of the ski. A mental focus on the toes often solves this problem.

post #4 of 5
Rusty,
What is your mental focus on the toes?..if you don't mind sharing.
post #5 of 5
Me????? I've got some sort of birth defect that makes coordination of fingers and toes pretty much brain dead. The big toe little toe focus does nothing for me. After the turn I can tell you I did it, but I can't consciously do it make a turn happen. That's just me. But it does work for most people. The two approaches I often see are pressing down or latterally with the big or little toes. These tips tend to automatically get the skier centered (via mental vs biomechanical).
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