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Abom goggles

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I bought these goggles online in advance of a 10 day heli trip in BC. Note I did not participate in the Abom kickstarter campaign (although I was aware of it) so I can't comment on anyone's experience in that regard. What I will say is that the googles totally work! No mater what the conditions or the exertion level, you can clear any for with a push of a button. While you can leave the anti- fog technology on, I chose to just turn it on when the googles began to fog up. Any fog disappeared very quickly. Any worry of fogging no matter what the condition becomes a thing of the past.

Actually it was pretty funny watching my boys regularly clearing their goggles in the chopper!

Couple issues that I hope Abom addresses in a second generation. The button to turn on the anti-fog function on the right side of the goggle is a little hard to find with gloves on. Also, the light in the upper right corner is a little hard to see with the goggle on in brighter light so it is sometimes hard to tell if you have turned the anti-fog function on. It would be great to have an audible confirmation but that may not be practicable with available battery life. Don't yet have a feel for extended battery life and how fast the battery life degrades. At first blush, battery life was no issue using the anti-fog technology as I detailed above.

As others have commented here, the goggles are on the large side. This did present a challenge with a Smith helmet. I found the combination pushed the goggle down on my nose and made breathing more difficult out of my nose. I found myself pushing the goggle helmet combination up on a regular basis to clear up breathing through my nose. Not sure why the made the goggle this big and I am encourage by some reports that the will be coming out with smaller models next year.


Given all of the above, good and sort of bad, you should run and buy these goggles immediately if you want to insure fog will never be an issue on your snow adventure. I have tried about every goggle over the years and Abom has finally solved the fog problem. Any other issues are a small price to pay and hopefully even those issues will be in the rear view mirror next season.
post #2 of 14
Fogging is so rare for me that the size issue would have me returning them. My current goggles are marginal in that regard already, but no where near as bad as others I've returned. I must be a medium or something, there's many brands where the size is too big or too small, rarely "just right".
post #3 of 14

Cool. What is the technology? This is the first I've heard of these.

post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Go to their web site...http://www.abom.com. Not sure I would accurately describe the technology.
post #5 of 14

OK. Read up on it. I was pretty interested until I remembered that the issue for me is fogging of my glasses inside the goggles. No help there, unfortunately.

post #6 of 14

I clicked on the link and went to the site and saw they were $250 and already all sold out. Whew that was easy, since I don't want to pay that much for goggles without a heads-up display, night vision, etc...

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmoliu View Post

OK. Read up on it. I was pretty interested until I remembered that the issue for me is fogging of my glasses inside the goggles. No help there, unfortunately.

The Smith goggle with a fan (Knowledge line?) will help clear fogged up glasses. I tried all the various "anti-fog" wipes and goo before biting the bullet and buying the Smith system, which is half the Abom cost. And the Smith goggle is a "lifetime" purchase, at least for the life of the fan. I had a fan fail and they replaced the goggle.
post #8 of 14

I'm happy with my Smith Knowledge OTG - put the fan on low and it will run for days. (I found out the hard way)

I think I paid $129 end of last season.

 

Abom uses a heated lens, slick.

Looks like lenses can't be swapped though.

post #9 of 14

Here on the east coast it is nice to be able to swap lenses as we can go from sunny to overcast to cloudy to outright pitch dark all in a matter of couple of runs. I have a lens for sunny days and another for the more typical new england cloudy days. At that price point (any goggle over $100) it would seem to warrant having that feature - most folks forking out $250 for a pair of goggles will surely be aware (want) that feature.

post #10 of 14

These sound neat, but do decent modern goggles actually have a problem with fog?

 

Admittedly my recent goggles have all had fairly expensive photochromic lenses, but all still came in at less than $250 MSRP, never fogged, and had non-photochromic options down to $150 or so MSRP which should be just as fog-resistant. The only way which I've seen any of these fog is if I forget to take them out of their case overnight while they're wet. Then humidity gets into the air gap between the inner and outer lens and the goggles fog up as soon as they get cold.

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Couple responses to people's comments above.

 

You can swap out lenses...I just bought a second lens but have not actually done the swap.  From what I understand, it is a little more complicated than normal due to the electronics.

 

On the fogging issue.  I have never had a problem with fogging in resort skiing.  Backcountry skiing or heli skiing is a different story as there is inevitably a degree of hiking or moving around in deep snow and a higher level of physical exertion.  For me, that is where these goggle shine.

 

One other update.  I got an email from Abom that said they did NOT have any plans to downsize the goggles next season, so my comments above on smaller models appear to be wrong.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by broondog View Post
 

Couple responses to people's comments above.

 

You can swap out lenses...I just bought a second lens but have not actually done the swap.  From what I understand, it is a little more complicated than normal due to the electronics.

 

On the fogging issue.  I have never had a problem with fogging in resort skiing.  Backcountry skiing or heli skiing is a different story as there is inevitably a degree of hiking or moving around in deep snow and a higher level of physical exertion.  For me, that is where these goggle shine.

 

One other update.  I got an email from Abom that said they did NOT have any plans to downsize the goggles next season, so my comments above on smaller models appear to be wrong.

Rarely hear of people with $100+ goggles having issues. And when they do, 90% of the time it's because they are not fitting properly (wrong goggles for their face type, gap between goggle and helmet, incorrectly swapping lenses...) or the conditions are just extreme (-25 degrees and goggles ice-up due to moisture from breathing into face mask/neck warmer). Personally the less gadgets/electronics the better. Less to worry about. 

post #13 of 14

Received a demo pair from Vince O'Malley (CTO of Abom) -- for evaluation during my Oregon Ski Safari.     https://www.facebook.com/or.ski.safari.2017/   I'll be skiing all winter in these goggles in all conceivable conditions and will report on the performance.    I'll be going to Every Area   Every Lift    Every Run  in Oregon for my 60th birthday, 50th year of skiing, and to celebrate unemployment (or retirement, I haven't decided).....

 

They fit my Smith helmet perfectly.

 

post #14 of 14

Fighter pilot goggles..

 

For open cockpit biplanes.

 

 

:)

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