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Shop tune by the name?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My skis found some rocks off Kachina today. Some dings on the edges and some shallow marks on the base. I'd like to have at least the edges fixed, so that's what I asked the shop to do. But the guy suggested I get a "full tune" not just the edge & wax job. Except I can get him to explain to me what the "full tune" does beyond a smooth base & edges.

I'm going up there again tomorrow, and the day after. I suspect my skies will find more rocks again, and again.

Can someone educate me on what a typical "full tune" involves and what benefits it provides?
post #2 of 14
A full tune should include a stone grind to flatten the base and freshen the structure, filling in larger dings in the p-tex (not necessarily all of them because some are too minor) set the bevels to your requested angles, polishing burrs, and wax/scrape/brush.
post #3 of 14

Tunes will vary from shop to shop, but where I live a full tune up includes:  p-tex of minor gouges, stone grind the base and sharpen edges to my preference, (or to factory specs), wax, scrape and brush.  They will also adjust my bindings or din setting if I ask.  

 

The benefits of tuning your skis or how often can depend, I suppose, on how much you ski or even the type of snow you typically ski on.  If you ski the hard pack like I do, except for an annual trip out west, my skis will "detune" rather quickly.  I may notice a bit of skidding at turn initiation.  If that's the case, it tells me my edges need sharpening.  Also, I lightly run my finger down my edges when I put my skis away for the day.  If I feel any burrs, I know I need to have them sharpened.  I have my skis waxed after 10-12 outings.  More often would probably be better, but it does start to get a bit expensive.  I keep telling myself I'm going to learn how to do this stuff myself, but ya know, life gets in the way and its easier to have someone who knows what they're doing taking care of my gear.  All I know about p-tex is that it's some type of compound that gets melted into any gouges.  That concludes what little I know.  Hope the info helps.      

post #4 of 14
Learn to tune and wax. A slight touch up every day or two keeps everything in peak condition and does little to wear out the ski. Wax every couple of days is the same.

Base grind only if required.

Max performance little effort low cost.
post #5 of 14
Totally agree with oldschoolskier! I started tuning and waxing my skis about three years ago and it has made a world of difference. Sure it is expensive on the front end, having to buy all the tuning and waxing gear and supplies, but you save money in the long run and get a lot more enjoyment out of your skis. Can't do much about conditions, but tuning gives you a little more control over the experience.

For example, I had a rock encounter of the second worst kind (worst is smashing into one) and had a bad core shot earlier this year. I probably would have got a semi-okay ptex job at the local shop, but instead I did it myself layering metalgrip first and then ptex. I have been out nine times since then and had no problems whatsoever with the patch. If I do, there are no wait times for getting it fixed and no concerns that the job is rushed.

Thus, thanks to doing my own skis the experience has been as good as could be hoped for (we keep losing our snow out east) with no concerns as to whether the shop did what was needed to "get my skis right".

Cheers!
post #6 of 14
I wouldn't worry about shallow marks in the base. Think of it as structure. You certainly don't want the bases ground to fix that, and that's what he might be doing depending on the depth of the mark. One would hope it's fillable, but him telling you to get a full tune makes me think he wants to grind it. Base grinds shorten the life of the ski, so you don't want to do them often.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I wouldn't worry about shallow marks in the base. Think of it as structure. You certainly don't want the bases ground to fix that, and that's what he might be doing depending on the depth of the mark. One would hope it's fillable, but him telling you to get a full tune makes me think he wants to grind it. Base grinds shorten the life of the ski, so you don't want to do them often.
Thanks for the information.

I thought the same, the shallow marks could be easily covered up by a new layer of wax. So was skepticle of a "full tune", which the guy was reluctant to explain what's involved (except it cost extra).

It was the edge dings that I wanted fixed most. And the fact I've been on it for about 10 days now and the snow wasn't exactly soft the past 10 days.

I doubt I will ever gone to the waxing part of ski maintene. Too much time and space than I got. Though I really should start doing minor edge clean ups myself. It actually seems LESS work & hassle to do my own edge than having to let a shop do it. Just inertia really that I haven't got started.
post #8 of 14
Just avoiding having to drop them off then go back again and pick them up, let alone the cost of regular maintenance, is enough for me to do it myself. Started slow, waxing only, and built up a little each year. I actually fear taking them to a shop these days. At least when I don't like a tune now, I know exactly what was done to them, since I'm the one who did it. Lol!
post #9 of 14

If you are still skiing Taos, don't waste your money on a full tune. Just de-burr and wax is all you need.

There will always another rock waiting for you in the trees. :D 

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

If you are still skiing Taos, don't waste your money on a full tune. Just de-burr and wax is all you need.
Yep, one more day! biggrin.gif

Quote:
There will always another rock waiting for you in the trees. biggrin.gif
They're there alright, them rocks are waiting even outside the trees. My skis keep finding many of them! smile.gif

One place where rocks hide are on the downhill side of bumps! I can see them riding up on the chair. But not from the uphill side where I come down. Mentally marking each of them during the chair ride can only work up to a point. the smaller one just escaped my mind's eyes.

I'm not too protective of my equipments though. As they say, every ski is a rock ski!

Just have to start on this tuning gig soon if I'm going to keep skiing these kind of places.
Edited by at_nyc - 2/15/16 at 7:09pm
post #11 of 14

Ah, the proverbial rocks on the downhill side of the bump problem.

Look up an instructor named Carl Shulman and ask him to teach you the hover technique. :D   

post #12 of 14
I call those "eastern moguls".
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

I call those "eastern moguls".

 

With a large western rock in the trough. 

Found a bunch of those on Granite Chief at Squaw during Feb 2012 before the nine foot dump. Skied them with Bud using a technique we called Wack-A-Mole. 

post #14 of 14

Not saying they don't happen out West.  Just that they make me the tiniest bit homesick when I find them there.

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