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Is it ok to take the kids out of school on a powder day - Page 4

post #91 of 95
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Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
 
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Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

that one was hiding when I when through the whole thread to make sure I wasn't duplicating.

Duplication is fine; it helps drive the point home.

I don't even call my skier friends on a pow day. The last thing I want is to wait for an 11 year-old.

I remember a particular powder day at Alpine Meadows --a dad yelling at his young son to hurry up as they headed for the growing lift line before the lifts opened. Not the ideal example of father-son bonding.

post #92 of 95
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Originally Posted by Alpha407 View Post

^^ And she wouldn't have learned those same lessons using the singles line and skiing pow on a Saturday?

 

Yes and no.  You take the powder days when you can get them, and if you have the opportunity to take advantage of one mid-week, it's typically head and shoulders over the weekend chaos.  Where my daughter  was concerned, she'd have had an opportunity for a lot of human interaction while skiing the weekend singles line, but that interaction would have been a lot different, as it's a significantly different crowd on the hill.  I'm going off on a little tangent here, but one of my frustrations in today's world is that kids (in general) are a lot more disconnected from the day-in/day-out outside world than in the past -- their existence is largely controlled environment of school and organized sports, the digital world, or a weekend/holiday environment.  When a good opportunity exists,  there's potential for huge benefit to a kid when you take them into different mid-week environments they don't often get to see.  How much of that potential benefit is realized is largely dictated by the parents, helping them to recognize the differences, the whys, etc...  (In last Friday's case, my daughter got to see a lot of folks working hard to squeeze in a couple hrs of great skiing before heading off to work, as well as her parents having to stop a couple times in the day for work calls and outside commitments.)  Nobody bats an eye when we take our daughter out of school for a couple days each spring for work (taking part in my inlaws cattle roundup/cutting/branding week) or her going to a jobsite mid-week with me to see a different part of Idaho and what I do for work -- why is it a problem when the motivator is fun but the potential for learning is as high?

post #93 of 95
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Originally Posted by maverick2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

It's only OK if your kid can be ready to be in the lift line at 730 and can keep up with you all day with no lunch.

We had a stormfront move thru last week that looked like it was going to dump, so we picked our surprised daughter (10) up after school on Thursday and headed the direction of the ski hill for what we hoped would be a family Friday Powder Day.  The gods smiled on us with a fresh 8" overnight and she was as excited as I've ever seen her for skiing, making sure we were on pace to be among one of the first on the lift.  She's a pretty competent/confident skier for her age and after knocking out a killer first run and were heading back to the lift she yelled "... you know, if we all hit the singles line, we'll get more laps this morning..." and w/o asking she led us into the singles line.  She's not a bashful kid at all, but I was wondering how she'd do on the lift among a chair full of young, self-involved big board powder chasers.  I ended up riding the chair behind her, and am still laughing -- true to form, she rode up with 3 guys in their 20's that were obviously together and there for the AM only to grab as much of the fresh snow they could before heading to work.  I figured she was going to get a big dose of "ignored on the chair" but I couldn't have been more wrong.  Riding behind her, I saw her dive into the middle of their banter, watching their heads swivel back and forth among each other to the little kid in their midst.  When I unloaded at the top, she was there waiting for me among her 3 new friends, and as I got there, they were asking her if she wanted to tag along with them for a run.  W/o missing a beat said "... thanks, but you guys would only slow me down...", high-fived one with her ski pole, and she took off for the trees again.  We ended up skiing the singles line most of the day, with her having some great experiences on the lift with strangers, and some that were downright boring.  (Interestingly enough, her best experiences were with groups she had little in common with, and worst was with a group of 3 girls just a couple yrs older than her that showed up at noon.)  The bottom line is that she learned and benefitted more about human nature and communication and human interactions in a dozen lift rides than she would have gained from another 6 hrs of school while chasing the 3 R's.  Education comes in a lot of different forms, and can be found anywhere if you take advantage of it.

 

Awesome!  Everyone I've ever met on the lifts has agreed that seeing little kids sliding on snow is special.  Chatting on the lifts with them is just as good.  Their enthusiasm is contagious!

post #94 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick2 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpha407 View Post

^^ And she wouldn't have learned those same lessons using the singles line and skiing pow on a Saturday?

 

Yes and no.  You take the powder days when you can get them, and if you have the opportunity to take advantage of one mid-week, it's typically head and shoulders over the weekend chaos.  Where my daughter  was concerned, she'd have had an opportunity for a lot of human interaction while skiing the weekend singles line, but that interaction would have been a lot different, as it's a significantly different crowd on the hill.  I'm going off on a little tangent here, but one of my frustrations in today's world is that kids (in general) are a lot more disconnected from the day-in/day-out outside world than in the past -- their existence is largely controlled environment of school and organized sports, the digital world, or a weekend/holiday environment.  When a good opportunity exists,  there's potential for huge benefit to a kid when you take them into different mid-week environments they don't often get to see.  How much of that potential benefit is realized is largely dictated by the parents, helping them to recognize the differences, the whys, etc...  (In last Friday's case, my daughter got to see a lot of folks working hard to squeeze in a couple hrs of great skiing before heading off to work, as well as her parents having to stop a couple times in the day for work calls and outside commitments.)  Nobody bats an eye when we take our daughter out of school for a couple days each spring for work (taking part in my inlaws cattle roundup/cutting/branding week) or her going to a jobsite mid-week with me to see a different part of Idaho and what I do for work -- why is it a problem when the motivator is fun but the potential for learning is as high?

It's OK to play hooky once in a while, for fun. No need to rationalize it's some unique educational opportunity.

post #95 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I remember a particular powder day at Alpine Meadows --a dad yelling at his young son to hurry up as they headed for the growing lift line before the lifts opened. Not the ideal example of father-son bonding.

I see it all of the time too. Recently at Bachelor just after opening bell I saw some little kid flopping around in deep-ish new snow trying to get his act together and get up while his dad was downhill below him watching skier after skier cut in fresh tracks all around him. Common sight.
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