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3D printing an base bevel file guide...

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
... wonder if anyone's tried it. Seems it might be a pretty straightforward design to print something like these:



I am in the process of teaching myself OpenSCAD, but might have some issue getting 3D printer time to actually make one. If anyone has a 3D printer and wants to try it, PM me and we can collaborate.

Thanks!
post #2 of 9

I work for a major defense contractor and we have a brand new 3d printing facility. I bet we could make one of those for less than $100k.

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post

... wonder if anyone's tried it. Seems it might be a pretty straightforward design to print something like these:



I am in the process of teaching myself OpenSCAD, but might have some issue getting 3D printer time to actually make one. If anyone has a 3D printer and wants to try it, PM me and we can collaborate.

Thanks!


Why?  You can buy these and they are not expensive.

$20.00 each

Base BEAST

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Because by my reckoning they might cost about $2-3 in materials to print. Of course the cost of the equipment is high ($100K is just being facetious).

I can get time at the local library's maker studio to use their 3D printers if I want to sit around and wait all day...
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdeangel View Post

Because by my reckoning they might cost about $2-3 in materials to print. Of course the cost of the equipment is high ($100K is just being facetious).

I can get time at the local library's maker studio to use their 3D printers if I want to sit around and wait all day...


Yea, you gotta have something to make.  I say go for it.  I know some guys who make lens caps for camera lenses because they always get lost! 

Let us know how it works out.

post #6 of 9
I saw Mattel had come out with a new Thingmaker.
post #7 of 9

I've had occasion to mess with our 3d printer from time to time.  It's an interesting toy.  You could easily knock out some file guides.  You do, however, have to have the skillz to actually draw what you want in 3d..or rip off something from the web.  Printing cost is actually fairly reasonable from a material point of view.  But it seems like the cheap printers actually break down fairly frequently.  By cheap I mean in the $2-$3k range.  And you have to pay also for wear and tear, not just materials, if you're using someone else's printer.  Still, as an exercise, it can be fun. 

post #8 of 9

Is there any strength to 3d printed materials? My impression was that the outputs from the consumer-grade units are fairly flimsy.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Is there any strength to 3d printed materials? My impression was that the outputs from the consumer-grade units are fairly flimsy.


It depends on the material used, how you lay it down and how it's designed.  The cheap ones are basically cheap plastic.  But if you design your item in such a way that you don't need very strong materials, you can do ok.  You know, a flat surface (really a wedge)  with a slot for a file that has little need for structural strength can be done.  But it's certainly not composite.  For the cheap ones that we have I would put the product on par with a buckle or loop-back thingie you get with a cheap backpack.  Maybe somewhat poorer.  But depending on what you're designing, that might be enough.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › 3D printing an base bevel file guide...